Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Land Management
Cobnut

Which pole saw?

Hello. Iím after a telescopic pole saw with a replaceable blade; can anyone recommend a good one please? Iíve heard Silky are excellent, and although this one
http://www.theselfsufficiencyshop.co.uk/203-silky-hayauchi-3-extension-pole-saw.html
is just what Iím after itís a bit on the pricey side. I prefer to get good quality, although Iím not a tree surgeon so it wonít have a hard life.
Bernie66

Silky are a great brand but that price????????????????

Surely there's a cheaper way
Cobnut

Surely there's a cheaper way

This is what I'm hoping Shocked There are others on the market but whether they are false economy or not I don't know Confused
Midland Spinner

We have a cheap-as-chips Saw-&-pruner combo. As we were using it this morning to take a high branch out of the weping willow I remarked to OH how it's worse than either implement on it's own. The saw is cheap & flexible, the pruner's cord gets in the way as does the spring for the pruner -and the telescopicness of the handle isn't much cop either.

I'd opt for a dedicated tool for each job. And buy the best you can afford (within reason) we only got this one because it was the only one available at the time and in all fairation it's been very useful - we've done a lot of pruning with it .but I think the neighbours may have learnt a few new words Embarassed

We managed to get the branch out of the willow safely, and it's now flat-packed on the lawn & in barrows while we have lunch.
We've got a lot more light on the new veg bed now Very Happy
Tavascarow

I watched an independent comparison between a silky & a Bahco pruning saw a while ago & the difference was extreme.
The Silky was cutting through apple branches about 40mm thick in one or two swipes, the Bahco was just like any other saw & needed a hell of a lot more input.
So if I had the money & needed the tool.
Shane

I've tried a cheapo one which lasted about five minutes, and a Wolf Garten one which was good, but struggled on high and / or thick branches. As the branches I was chasing were getting higher, I bit the bullet and bought the same Silky that you're looking at. Don't regret it for a minute - it's tough, and cuts like a hot knife through butter. I've also got the lopper attachment for it, which I don't use much, but it is also very well made.

I went for the Silky because I'd already got one of their hand saws, the Silky Zubat 330, which was a revelation to me after years of using bow saws.

In short, the pole saw is blimmin' expensive, but very well made and really does the job - if you can afford it, buy one and you won't regret it.
tahir

Silky are absolutely fabulous, streets ahead of anything else I've ever used.
Cobnut

Thanks everyone. Sounds as though the general consensus of opinion is get a Silky if I can afford it then Smile
Tavascarow

Just had a thought.
Why not buy a Silky pruning saw & get someone cunning & devious to construct a pole to fit it to?
Treacodactyl

I was just going to say, do you really need it to be over 6m long? However, I've a normal garden pole saw with a wooden handle and that's not really up to the job, it's too bendy and it's much shorter than 6m. If you do need it that long I doubt you'd save that much buying a cheaper version would you?

If you do get it I'd be very interested to hear how you get on.
Cobnut

Just had a thought.
Why not buy a Silky pruning saw & get someone cunning & devious to construct a pole to fit it to?

Funny you should suggest that because Iíd already wondered whether I could just tape a pruning saw to a pole as I did something similar to a paint brush and it worked OK.

I was just going to say, do you really need it to be over 6m long?...

ÖIf you do get it I'd be very interested to hear how you get on.
Hmm, Iím not sure really, Iíll have to give it some more thought. I suppose the longer the pole the more difficult it would be to handle. Iíll let you know when I buy something and road test it.
Midland Spinner

You can get extending roller poles in paint stores. Treacodactyl

I don't know if this site is any help, I've just stumbled across it whilst looking up details for something else. There's a few threads about polesaws there.

http://www.arbtalk.co.uk/
Tavascarow

Just had a thought.
Why not buy a Silky pruning saw & get someone cunning & devious to construct a pole to fit it to?
Funny you should suggest that because Iíd already wondered whether I could just tape a pruning saw to a pole as I did something similar to a paint brush and it worked OK.
U clamps/bolts would be stronger.
Shane

If you're going for a pole of any decent length, you'll find that unless it's very strong it flexes significantly when you start sawing, which exhausts you very quickly. You can either get around this by using a beefy pole (heavy = also tiring) or by employing Silky's method of an oval section. I don't think a paint brush extender will be anywhere near strong enough for the job.

I would use metal clamps to hold the blade to the end of the pole (U-section things that bolt together) like they use to use to fix gutters to house walls before they went all plastic. If you use a set of clamps at the top and bottom of the blade, you can clamp them around the end of the pole. It looks good in my head, but isn't as easy to describe as I was hoping Laughing
onemanband

I got a 14foot corona fibre-glass extending pruner with detatchable saw blade. Bought from arbiculturists suppliers. They said it was cheapest professional one they did. Cost about £90. Had it about three years and had no problems with it - infact I'm very pleased with it.
I've only used the saw twice tho as the pruner/secateer will cut upto an inch and a half.
Not an expert in this field but I rekon you need a pole longer than height of branch. This means you can have the pole at an angle which means gravity assists your cutting, your neck wont hurt as much(from looking up) and branches won't hit you on your head. Oh and wear a hard hat !!
Like all tools buy the best you can afford. If you buy cheap you'll regret it when it breaks and you have to buy another, and end up spending more than the cost of the proper tool in the first place.
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Land Management
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home