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Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 16 3:18 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Well, spending the money only gets you the label, you can get the same benefits without being a member of the soil association, or indeed any certification body.

As for the No.1 veg box, well take a look at their website.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Rob R wrote:
Well, spending the money only gets you the label, you can get the same benefits without being a member of the soil association, or indeed any certification body.

As for the No.1 veg box, well take a look at their website.
No you do save your £650.00 & I doubt that will stop you from using the publicity in your promotion either.
But I did post it for your benefit.

Paying £650.00 gives customers a larger degree of reassurance that things are as they should be. Also a broader reach for the producer.
Even budget supermarkets like Aldi are carrying a good range of organic F&V.
Tesco stock a good range of organic fruit & veg, meat & dairy (milk, yoghurts & cheese).
Although the soil association label isn't very evident on the supermarket shelves which is a shame.
Their higher standards don't lend them selves to mass marketing as readily as some of the other labels IMHO.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Tavascarow wrote:
No you do save your £650.00 & I doubt that will stop you from using the publicity in your promotion either.
But I did post it for your benefit.


Thanks, but I'm not a member of the soil association, so no, I don't use their publicity in my promotion - that would be dishonest.

Tavascarow wrote:
Paying £650.00 gives customers a larger degree of reassurance that things are as they should be. Also a broader reach for the producer.
Even budget supermarkets like Aldi are carrying a good range of organic F&V.
Tesco stock a good range of organic fruit & veg, meat & dairy (milk, yoghurts & cheese).
Although the soil association label isn't very evident on the supermarket shelves which is a shame.
Their higher standards don't lend them selves to mass marketing as readily as some of the other labels IMHO.


The other day you were so critical of a big name stocking organic because 'does it really make any difference'...

But anyway, all I'm saying is that the research was conducted on organic production, not on organic certification. The SA put it perfectly when they said How we farm affects the quality of the food we eat.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I read a very good article recently about the dumming down of the 'organic' labels & it's true.
EU organic standards aren't as high as they used to be.
The popularity & increase in sales are making it more attractive to producers & standards have changed along with the type of producers that are getting involved.
I personally see both positives & negatives in that.
It's good there are fewer farmers throwing pesticides & fertilizer around.
It's not so good that some producers are more market orientated, as I feel they may not be as attentive.
The system requires detailed attention to work IMHO. It's also encouraging the specialist instead of the small mixed family farms which as you know I believe is the future.

There is a difference between a retailer selling a broad range of organic produce & a fast food producer selling a crap meal where your coffee happens to have a few millilitres of organic milk in it IMHO.
I don't like supermarkets but to source certain organic goods it's that or online shopping & both have similar problems.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

But the supermarkets are only responding to consumer demand, the same way McD's are. That said, it's not just a few ml, 21 million litres of organic milk are used by McDoanlds, which represents 5.5% of the annual UK organic milk production.

I also read an article this morning that says farmers are cutting down on fertilisers this year as a result of depressed prices and BPS payment delays.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If I shop at Tesco probably over 75% of what I buy will be organic.
If I have a meal at McDonalds with a white coffee what's the percentage likely to be?
1%? Possibly less.
Will the meals I cook with the food I buy be better for my health & the health of the planet than a 'happy meal' & white coffee?
There's the difference.

When McDonalds sell a happy meal that's 75% organic I'll let you buy me one.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33627
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

http://www.triplepundit.com/2015/09/mcdonalds-serves-up-its-first-100-organic-hamburger/

Will you travel?

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't expect you'd buy a happy meal, but I also don't expect most people who use McD's would refuse to if they didn't use organic milk, either. They use it because they're travelling, or busy, or as a treat for the kids, so if they're getting people who wouldn't necessarily buy organic produce and cook from scratch, to actually consume some organic produce and encourage extra production of organic, that's got to be a good thing, surely?

As I said before, I find it difficult to find organic (or decent) milk in local shops and the nearest McDonald's is right next to a garage with Costa. So if I wanted a coffee there I have three options - buy one from the garage and get British milk, buy one from McDonalds and get Organic milk or buy one from the local cafe and get some milk.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
http://www.triplepundit.com/2015/09/mcdonalds-serves-up-its-first-100-organic-hamburger/

Will you travel?
No.
But if I'm passing through on other business I'll give it a go.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sustainability is complex: There is no single diet solution

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Tavascarow wrote:
Sustainability is complex: There is no single diet solution


Good article, aside from the no single diet solution title, followed by the single diet solution in the article.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Rob R wrote:
Tavascarow wrote:
Sustainability is complex: There is no single diet solution


Good article, aside from the no single diet solution title, followed by the single diet solution in the article.
There's no pleasing some people.
I assume you mean this paragraph.
Quote:
The quest for sustainable food production is highly complex and there will be no one-size-fits-all solution. Indeed, the necessary solutions will inevitably be highly complex, multi-faceted and site-specific: it comes down not simply to what you eat, but fundamentally how it is farmed. There is no single diet solution for everyone, and consuming nutritionally appropriate levels of pasture-raised livestock products as part of a healthy, balanced diet with plenty of sustainably produced vegetables and fruits is not just an acceptable option, itís a vital one. And while developed nations urgently need to reduce the production and consumption of unsustainable, low-welfare, intensively raised livestock products and highly processed foods (thereís a good chance many of us would feel a lot better for it), it is clear from current science that pasture-based livestock systems will not only continue to supply high-quality, nutritious food to global populations, but can help protect and enhance key ecosystem services and mitigate anthropocentric GHG emissions.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 16 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, don't you agree?

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 16 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Rob R wrote:
Yes, don't you agree?

I struggle to see how
Quote:
appropriate levels of pasture-raised livestock products as part of a healthy, balanced diet with plenty of sustainably produced vegetables and fruits
is a single diet choice other than all being sustainable.
Some will eat more or less of certain commodities than others as we do now.
So no I don't agree.
No mention of sustainable fisheries though.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 16 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I guess I read 'appropriate' wrong, rather it is a variable that could vary greatly, depending upon the circumstances.

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