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Wood burner flue out through wall?

 
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boisdevie1



Joined: 11 Aug 2006
Posts: 3896
Location: Lancaster
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 16 5:19 pm    Post subject: Wood burner flue out through wall?  Reply with quote    

I'm going to install a woodburner but rather than have the flue pass through the roof could I not have the flue go vertical and take a bend and pass out through the top of the wall and then another bend to straighten it up so the flue exits parallel to the wall. That way I don't have to pierce the roof and pay for a cowl and can still profit by all that heat coming off the flue pipe before it exits the room?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33661
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 16 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That's exactly what ours does, so that we didn't have to run it through the bedroom and the expensive roof.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8404
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 16 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you put bends in don't use right angles but 45 degrees.
Right angles act as a trap for soot & tar & restrict the smoke flow somewhat.
I know through experience.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32886
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 16 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

iirc it will need a inner flue and outer pipe to protect the wall from thermal shocks (and to keep the flue gasses warm to get a good draft).a stove supplier should be able to advise and provide suitable parts.

remember a rodding point to give access to the bends and riser just in case the rods are too stiff to make the turns from the burner end.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4662
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 16 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
iirc it will need a inner flue and outer pipe to protect the wall from thermal shocks (and to keep the flue gasses warm to get a good draft).a stove supplier should be able to advise and provide suitable parts.


AKA a double-wall or twin-wall flue I believe.

wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14805
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 16 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Which will cost about twice as much as the wood burner...

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33661
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 16 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

wellington womble wrote:
Which will cost about twice as much as the wood burner...


The pipe work is not cheap, it's true.

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 16 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A cowl (do you mean flashing ?) costs approx the same, if not less, than an insulated flue 45' bend. You will need 2 bends, but only one flashing.

IIRC it is advisable to have the bends for a flue to pass through an external wall, as close to the burner as possible.

joanne



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7085
Location: Morecambe, Lancashire
PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 16 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As you are in Lancaster, speak to Fraser Smalley

https://www.facebook.com/sendforFraser/

He installed my liners for me but he's very friendly and open to giving advice for self-installation

If you are looking for prices, he recommended this site for all the liners and cowls

http://www.fluesupplies.com/

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3976
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 16 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Like Onemanband states,directly through the external wall behind the burner,but what I`ve seen have been a 90 degree bend with a water trap,also used for sweeping the external flue,

With the twin wall flue pipe,its insulated between both wall`s and doesn't omit heat to benefit it being inside.

Flue Supplies.com I can also recommend for price and quality,pointed out to me by ?the lady from Montgomery with the white dog on avater.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 16 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Our wood burning stove has a straight run of about 18 feet / 6 meters and then out the roof. It was installed in the (pre-existing) house the year after we moved here. The twin wall chimney pipe has an air gap between the two, with slits at the bottom of each outer section. This provides additional heated air for the upper story of our open plan house. Maybe twice a year in heavy rain when the wind is strong and from a certain direction do we get a little water leaking from above. Otherwise we appreciate that we are getting maximum heating from the wood we burn. And there is not that much creosote when the chimney is cleaned every year because we're careful to only burn well seasoned wood.



And a good place to display an appropriate piece of art


boisdevie1



Joined: 11 Aug 2006
Posts: 3896
Location: Lancaster
PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 16 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks for all the advice everyone. Much appreciated.

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