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Just a whiff of the barmaids apron.
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Shan



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 6752
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 10:49 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Nice looking apples.

OtleyLad



Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 2693
Location: Otley, West Yorkshire
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There's something slightly pervy and exiting about "A whiff of the Barmaids Apron"

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13432

PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A pervy barmaid ? That's many a drinking mans idea of a dream come true !

I've been on my hands and knees all morning in the grass. Not with a barmaid I hasten to add but picking windfalls. Its rather like a big boys version of collecting conkers. I've really enjoyed it but I've got a lot more to do and heavy rain is forecast for this afternoon.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 5758
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

named because of the russetting on the skin?

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13432

PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes I think so. We've touched on this before but there are loads of weird and wonderful names out there for varieties of apples and other fruits too.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4334
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The name is reminiscent of my region's "sheep's nose" which is also quite good for cider: http://www.newenglandapples.org/2014/09/03/new-england-apples-on-new-england-apple-day/

Ours is more snout shaped than yours

Woo



Joined: 19 Sep 2011
Posts: 757
Location: Mayenne, Pays de Loire
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

this post prompted me to check on my cassis.
thanks Bodger!
I hope the rain kept off for your apple hunt!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32228
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 16 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

does a bloody ploughman match up with a stinking bishop?

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13432

PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 16 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slack-ma-Girdle has got to be one of my favourite cider apple names, its an old variety of cider apple that's origins began in the South-West of England.
I've got to pick a few more apples today and then I'll be ready for our final pressing of the season tomorrow, weather permitting.

We picked six more trugs full yesterday. The number of blackbirds beneath the trees sharing the fallen apples with us was amazing.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8115

PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 16 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I got my quince wine into the demi-john last night. Not so colourful names but still along the same lines.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13432

PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 16 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You all know me as being a bit of a show off. We made another 55 gallons of cider today, so that handful of Brown Snout apples really did make for a sniff of the barmaids apron. The press has been put away for another year.

I've never had any experience with growing or brewing quinces but they do sound rather old fashioned and interesting.

Happy and successful brewing to everyone.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32228
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 16 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i just made 3 l of quince jelly and im now convinced they are nice (unlike the type my parents grew which were horrible ) .

i recon pulp fermented in juice and strained and then added to more apple juice they would make an awesome special brew cider

the new orchard might get a couple of them to add to the variety available.

well done for a 55 gal day at the end of the season.

my latest 15 ltr is a bit domestic in comparison but it is doing a rather good lava lamp impersonation in the kitchen

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8115

PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 16 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You did well with your cider Bodger. I make quince jelly, quince brandy (quinces soaked in brandy for a nice long time), and quince wine. Occasionally also do them poached in water as I don't think they need any other flavouring.

Some added to cider might be nice. Not a great fan of cider with other fruits, but that might go well.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13432

PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 16 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Those quince creations, especially the brandy finds me almost wishing for a hard cold winter and glass of quince brandy in front of a roasting hot log fire.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8115

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 16 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It is quite acceptable without the log fire.

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