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... the sky is baby blue, and the just-unfurling leaves ...
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cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1477

PostPosted: Mon May 08, 17 10:00 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

I am eminently distractable as you will have worked out by now, and of course the fact I work on two wheels, and one has a rather larger bobbin that is useful for plying onto from the smaller bobbins means i am continually swapping them about. I did discover a spare bobbin in one of the bags I also cart about between home, History Room and anywhere else i might be working, so was able to keep going. The dyed yarn chain plyed nicely and the colour definition is good - I am fairly happy with it - just need to peel off 50gm for the actual entry skein. It weighs around 96gm so I will end up with two about the same size.

The art yarn, not so much. Once you strip it back to 50g (actually 52 to get it to join up at the knot, plus whatever the ties weigh), you don't get much yarn for your money. Not terribly happy with it now it is done, but that's what they will be getting, and I don't expect to get any prizes anyway.



Here's the Medlar-inspired yarn



I am pretty happy with this one - the colours are nice, and the skein is completely balanced, so that's all good.

Apart from some local politics and other nonsense there's nowt to report. Tomorrow is History Room again and so I will spin some of the Gottland and see how I go.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8486

PostPosted: Tue May 09, 17 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As you say, 50g of the art yarn doesn't look very much, but with things like that, it is what appeals to the judges on the day, so you might do better than you think. The medlar yarn looks good and 50g of that looks quite a respectable amount. Your spinning has come on really well as it is nice and even. Compare it to what you produced only a few months ago and it is brilliant. Good luck in the competitions.

Yesterday I was in engineer mode. Went to a sixth form college (16-18 year olds) to look at their final projects for a prize I give in memory of my father who helped the students there as an experienced engineer. The winner had a pretty good project using electronics and he really knew his stuff. I think the two runners up you can say that they learnt a lot during the project, but they overcame the problems they encountered and achieved a good result.

Forgot to say, son and DIL have been up north this weekend and they got market surveyed yesterday. Wanted to know if son used beard oil, and if so what scent was the preferred one. I think his most common ones are chain oil and diesel that he gets splashed with sometimes, so we all found that a bit amusing. Still I have been wondering about this sort of thing for over 30 years since I heard two male apprentices discussing dyed streaks in their hair.

After that we went on to an old house where they are removing the roof to do work on it. Some of it dates back to the 16th century, and it is interesting to see the different ways the roofs are constructed. Otherwise dry but with a cold wind. Today looks the same but sunny.

We have a charcoal kiln to fill today, so although all the wood is ready next to the kiln, that will be a fairly heavy job.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1641
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Tue May 09, 17 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The rain has stopped. Now we're having sunny morning changing to puffy white clouds then full overcast back to broken clouds. Clearing at night and cold for this time of year. It was not quite 4 degrees Celsius last night. And that is dangerously on the chilly side for the tender plants. The uncovered bananas are stretching into growth and unfurling, there's no way to cover them.

Saturday soiree at the iris garden - only the early dwarf bearded iris were in flower. Some very pretty and other unusual ones.



Ample food - club provided catered chicken entree, embellished rice, very tasty vegetable medley, and salad. Ample desserts brought by members. Oddly enough, the various people bringing appetizers were the latest to arrive. I would visit more often than every few years but the garden is a little over 60 miles away.

Sunday at Bouman Stickney was 18th century ice cream making. In the barn. With the doors wide open, for light I suppose. Numerous small children having a wonderful time helping and also getting into my images. People were wearing puffy winter jackets and I was sorry I was not.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1345
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue May 09, 17 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We too are in a good spell of weather just now though cold this morning at 5am as I went out of the house, I am hoping it will continue. Much easier to move house and my rubbish in good weather than in the wet.

Is dead willow a good fire wood for logs, MR? I ask because I will be getting rid of a willow which is growing self set in a place too close to the house for comfort. I expect it will have to be stacked to season for some time, but you are the expert in these matters I also want to know what chemical to put on the stump that is left to ensure it stops deciding to regrow or not, after I have cut it down.
I expect that the pole lathe will be better viewing as it has a much faster result than the basket work, and so many folks today don't have a long attention span-I want it and now! Blame t'internet-why not? Not that the net is all bad, but so NOW not in 5 minutes, even though such speed can save lives. I hope that makes sense, the internet has opened my life past the farm gate anyway, and I am very grateful for that.

I wouldn't knock either of the yarns you have spun Cassandra, both have as much chance as the rest of the entries, it is all about the judges on the day and their mood, good luck! I have seen pigs win classes which they shouldn't have even been entered into, let alone win-turned out toes, slightly lame, not walking on their toes as they should be, positive thinking needed.

How good to be able to help students, MR, regardless of what the subject is, engineering in your case. I do as much as I can for the playgroup in Llanfyllin by making "things" that they want. I put the wendy house up and did the sand pit up for them, and other bits where I can-I have spent hours doing fishes on sticks when the play leader is behind with projects and refurbished the mini shop. I also supply them with large sheets of H/D cardboard for her to paint on-we simply throw it away into a baler for getting rid of!

I love the iris Jam Lady. It was 3 degrees this am when I went to work at 5 am., thanks to the inventor of the exterior thermometer in my car which tells me all. It's only fault is that it doesn't get me up and drive to work for me, do the job and come back home and tell me how I did! I hope the bananas survive. I find that as the day goes on I shed layers of clothes down from 6 to 3, as the day warms up so do I!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8486

PostPosted: Wed May 10, 17 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As you say, interesting irises Jam Lady. Only our very early ones have been out yet as far as I know. Our yellow flag in the pond are coming up, but don't expect them for some weeks yet. The 18th century ice cream making sounds interesting; using ice with salt and having either a hand turned ice cream maker or stirring like mad every so often no doubt.

It is cold here this morning and the northerly winds we have had over the last week or so have kept the temperature down, but they are supposed to change round today and it is going to be quite warm I think.

We have the two charcoal kilns to fire today, but I am going shopping, so will leave the early part to the menfolk and join husband later in the afternoon, probably when son goes home. We filled the kiln yesterday and hopefully it won't be a long burn as everything is quite dry.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1345
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 17 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

When is the show and judging taking place for the yarns, Cassandra? My fingers are crossed for your exhibits and the continuation of the show. I think in rural areas these shows are important. It is where some of the 'timid' members of the community, learn improvements for whatever they are doing in life. In our local shows there are lots of different classes for folks to show what they can achieve. Anyway best of luck.

I don't understand what a bobbin is-well I thought it was the thing the fleece wool went onto as it was spun. The question is are they a standard item, and following that are they wooden? I guess that if I get excited the net will give me an answer to "if I get the right kit can they can be made?"

We are in a spell of cold mornings and warm afternoons, which suits me as I am still moving rubbish from a to b. Only 2 more loads and another building is clear. Then I start the barn; that is mainly timber and I will be stacking that outside under plastic sheeting on top and open sides to help keep it dry' that is the theory; how it actually happens is in the lap of the gods!

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1641
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 17 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My sister, older than me, will have a lumpectomy for breast cancer next Tuesday. Hope all goes well and this will be the only necessary treatment. She's in Israel.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8486

PostPosted: Fri May 12, 17 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The bobbin is the spool the spun yarn is wound onto on the spinning wheel as it is spun Gregotyn. It is quite possible to make them, but you need to get the spool right for the wheel. Mine has a groove at the back to take the string that goes round the wheel.

You seem to be making progress. If you have some sort of roof or cover over the timber and open sides it should keep dry. We recommend having the wood for firewood raised on bearers (or for short lengths a pallet) with a roof over the top rather than just plastic on top of the top layer, as this allows good air circulation, but plastic sheet on top layer is certainly better than nothin.

Jam Lady, I hope your sister has a successful operation and nothing more needs to be done. It is worrying for you being so far apart.

We fired the kiln again on Wednesday, so after doing the shopping I went up there with husband and did some more on the basket I started at the weekend. I have put as much in as I can for now, but there is still a couple of rows of weaving to do in the middle in a few days when the weavers have dried and shrunk. Yesterday I made one spoon and most of another out of field maple. Not the easiest wood to work, at least ours isn't as the grain seems to wander a bit. They are flat 'fig shaped bowl' medieval style as we have a living history fair coming up, and hope to sell some to the re-enactors.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1345
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri May 12, 17 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, Jam Lady, I hope all is successful with your sister's operation.

Individual makes of spinning wheels have different sized spools to fit their needs?; I am deducing that spools are not to a standard size, but to the make of spinning wheel; ie. I need a sample if it is something I could make. I will get on the net.

I am making progress in the moving stakes-not fast enough for the landlord, but he should have thought of that when he took me on and put it down in writing! I have a few aces if I need them where he is concerned, which I will make known to him when I leave. How things change when you are there and fencing fields for him, unpaid, for a weekend when you would rather be looking for a house as it was in the early times there. Never mind total independence soon.
Yes we used to have large quantities of timber delivered when I first went to the 'wood' factory making pallets, packing cases and fencing panels-45 years ago now-all by the artic. load. Each pack was covered with a water proof type of paper as most of it was deck cargo on the ships. Mostly from Sweden and Russia. They could only move it from the areas in summer and winter as they were too wet in the spring and autumn to move into the forests to extract. At one point we were the largest fencing panel maker in Europe, and all made by hand. One man could put in a nail so fast to watch was frightening-he never needed the tap and then hit, he just released just in time, (jit). Occasionally he was joot, (just out of time), and then he had to go to hospital-about once a year!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8486

PostPosted: Sat May 13, 17 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There are some common types of wheel Gregotyn; Ashford is a well known one, so you could look on their website as I expect they sell extra spools. You might find the dimensions there, of borrow one and that one would fit a lot of wheels.

Pity your landlord is giving you hassle, but if you have a trump up your sleeve, hopefully he will leave you alone and let you get on.

Your fence panel work sounds interesting. Did you make the 'larch lap' type or some other, and what timber did you use?

We had our first rain here for some weeks, which is good for the garden, but not so good for work, as it kept raining on husband and son and they couldn't empty the charcoal kiln. Instead they cut a bit of firewood and put it in the store.

I managed to plant our one bed of cabbage seedlings yesterday and resow some salsify and parsnip that didn't come up. I may have to buy some new parsnip seed if these don't work, but haven't seen any salsify seed at all this year.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1345
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat May 13, 17 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The fencing panels were made of imported Portuguese maritime pine, also brought in by the ship load, grown as you can imagine at a great rate-the annual growth rings being miles apart! The 6ft. logs were cut into fencing slats in Portugal which saved us a sawdust mountain, and time. Panel framing and posts were cut in home grown softwood. Mostly bought in, but when I ran our mill I used to cut posts as well as framing the panel shop. We also cut capping rails in house. I couldn't begin to compete with the imported slats. I had a lovely multi rip saw which would cut a 16ml thick slab of soft wood into as many as 8 pieces of framing at one pass, the man who cut it into useable lengths couldn't keep up! My main output was feather edge boards for our fencing erection company-we couldn't cut enough at 6ft. We also copped for the one offs as no one else in the company wanted to do that sort of thing; it ruined their production figures. I however relished the one off as it reduced the monotony. And I could do one offs for me as the gaffa nothing like being able to use the company tools to produce a planed whatever. I was married into the family at the time, so not as bad as it seemed as one or 2 of my products came to production fruition, which is satisfying. Not much else to report, just looking forward to getting moved and gardening again. first thing to make will be a greenhouse, nothing to beat a home grown anything, 'specially new potatoes at Christmas! And that first tomato!

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 5803
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sat May 13, 17 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I wonder if the Radiata Pine in NZ is related to the Portuguese maritime Pine?
Grows straight at an amazing rate, and the export of it is mind boggling...and it isn't a native

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1641
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Sat May 13, 17 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This is for you, Gregotyn - libraries in rural Oregon are shutting down: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/13/us/anti-tax-fervor-roseburg-oregon-.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

My sister has four children. Three live in USA, one in Denmark. Her oldest son was with her for various tests and discussions, returned home on Friday. Her daughter will fly to Israel on Monday so will be there for the surgery and after care. Plus, my sister has many dear, good friends who are eager to do what they can to help.

I was going to make a Garden Conservancy visit to a friend's garden today but it is raining in a very determined fashion. About 3/4 inch of rain since midnight. So I will work at repotting more amaryllis, etc that spent the winter in the basement and are now yawning, stretching, starting into growth even though not watered and in the dark.

Here's an image of one of my funky Japanese jack-in-the-pulpits to entertain you.



There's a charming folk tale about Taro Urashima, a simple fisher lad who rescues a sea turtle. It's a magical turtle. Taro goes under the sea (think of the fairy folk taking a human under the hill), and when he gets back home hundreds of years have past, the village is unrecognizeable, suddenly he's an old man and falls down dead. But I do like this strange arisaema with its fishing line like extension.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8486

PostPosted: Sun May 14, 17 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That sounds like good work Gregotyn. I can understand why you wanted to do the one offs, but if output was the goal, it would have mucked up the figures. Good luck with getting a greenhouse going and your potatoes for Christmas.

Gz they are probably related, but most pines grow pretty straight, although some in our woods have a good curve on them. They are also pretty quick growing. In retaliation if we grow southern beech, nothofagus species in the UK they grow pretty fast too, and count as a hardwood. They were to be the saviour of the British forestry industry, but sadly they tend to blow over very badly on some soils.

Do you grow amaryllis outside Jam Lady? They are definitely a pot plant here, usually given as Christmas presents. I hope your sister does well; it seems she has plenty of support. That is a really weird plant you pictured. Definitely classed as an exotic here.

We had our volunteer group yesterday and spent the time digging out the sumps alongside one of the tracks. As far as possible we try to keep the water from running out of the woods, so put in catches and sumps along one of the main paths that runs into a lane. They get filled with silt, so need digging out every so often.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1641
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Sun May 14, 17 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

When we moved from Connecticut to New Jersey we moved So. Much. Stuff. The company himself worked for was paying for the move so it didn't matter. But Mr Jam Lord said he wasn't going to move all the scrap lumber from his workshop. It is now a couple of decades later and there are all sorts and sizes of offcuts, a few pieces of firewood with "just too interesting" grain to just burn up, some black walnut that's been turned into lumber and is "seasoning" - you get the idea.

Mistress Rose, hippeastrum / amaryllis have been hybridized so that while many still have a dormant period there are some that are evergreen. The leafy all year spend winter in the greenhouse. The dormant in winter go into the basement where I ignore them. All go outdoors for summer when they are in active growth. Their natural blooming period is late spring into summer. As you can see from these April & May 2017 images mine successfully repeat bloom in subsequent years but not for Christmas.






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