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... the sky is baby blue, and the just-unfurling leaves ...
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gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1292
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat May 13, 17 9:10 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

The fencing panels were made of imported Portuguese maritime pine, also brought in by the ship load, grown as you can imagine at a great rate-the annual growth rings being miles apart! The 6ft. logs were cut into fencing slats in Portugal which saved us a sawdust mountain, and time. Panel framing and posts were cut in home grown softwood. Mostly bought in, but when I ran our mill I used to cut posts as well as framing the panel shop. We also cut capping rails in house. I couldn't begin to compete with the imported slats. I had a lovely multi rip saw which would cut a 16ml thick slab of soft wood into as many as 8 pieces of framing at one pass, the man who cut it into useable lengths couldn't keep up! My main output was feather edge boards for our fencing erection company-we couldn't cut enough at 6ft. We also copped for the one offs as no one else in the company wanted to do that sort of thing; it ruined their production figures. I however relished the one off as it reduced the monotony. And I could do one offs for me as the gaffa nothing like being able to use the company tools to produce a planed whatever. I was married into the family at the time, so not as bad as it seemed as one or 2 of my products came to production fruition, which is satisfying. Not much else to report, just looking forward to getting moved and gardening again. first thing to make will be a greenhouse, nothing to beat a home grown anything, 'specially new potatoes at Christmas! And that first tomato!

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 5780
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Sat May 13, 17 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I wonder if the Radiata Pine in NZ is related to the Portuguese maritime Pine?
Grows straight at an amazing rate, and the export of it is mind boggling...and it isn't a native

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1601
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Sat May 13, 17 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This is for you, Gregotyn - libraries in rural Oregon are shutting down: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/13/us/anti-tax-fervor-roseburg-oregon-.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

My sister has four children. Three live in USA, one in Denmark. Her oldest son was with her for various tests and discussions, returned home on Friday. Her daughter will fly to Israel on Monday so will be there for the surgery and after care. Plus, my sister has many dear, good friends who are eager to do what they can to help.

I was going to make a Garden Conservancy visit to a friend's garden today but it is raining in a very determined fashion. About 3/4 inch of rain since midnight. So I will work at repotting more amaryllis, etc that spent the winter in the basement and are now yawning, stretching, starting into growth even though not watered and in the dark.

Here's an image of one of my funky Japanese jack-in-the-pulpits to entertain you.



There's a charming folk tale about Taro Urashima, a simple fisher lad who rescues a sea turtle. It's a magical turtle. Taro goes under the sea (think of the fairy folk taking a human under the hill), and when he gets back home hundreds of years have past, the village is unrecognizeable, suddenly he's an old man and falls down dead. But I do like this strange arisaema with its fishing line like extension.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8307

PostPosted: Sun May 14, 17 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That sounds like good work Gregotyn. I can understand why you wanted to do the one offs, but if output was the goal, it would have mucked up the figures. Good luck with getting a greenhouse going and your potatoes for Christmas.

Gz they are probably related, but most pines grow pretty straight, although some in our woods have a good curve on them. They are also pretty quick growing. In retaliation if we grow southern beech, nothofagus species in the UK they grow pretty fast too, and count as a hardwood. They were to be the saviour of the British forestry industry, but sadly they tend to blow over very badly on some soils.

Do you grow amaryllis outside Jam Lady? They are definitely a pot plant here, usually given as Christmas presents. I hope your sister does well; it seems she has plenty of support. That is a really weird plant you pictured. Definitely classed as an exotic here.

We had our volunteer group yesterday and spent the time digging out the sumps alongside one of the tracks. As far as possible we try to keep the water from running out of the woods, so put in catches and sumps along one of the main paths that runs into a lane. They get filled with silt, so need digging out every so often.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1601
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Sun May 14, 17 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

When we moved from Connecticut to New Jersey we moved So. Much. Stuff. The company himself worked for was paying for the move so it didn't matter. But Mr Jam Lord said he wasn't going to move all the scrap lumber from his workshop. It is now a couple of decades later and there are all sorts and sizes of offcuts, a few pieces of firewood with "just too interesting" grain to just burn up, some black walnut that's been turned into lumber and is "seasoning" - you get the idea.

Mistress Rose, hippeastrum / amaryllis have been hybridized so that while many still have a dormant period there are some that are evergreen. The leafy all year spend winter in the greenhouse. The dormant in winter go into the basement where I ignore them. All go outdoors for summer when they are in active growth. Their natural blooming period is late spring into summer. As you can see from these April & May 2017 images mine successfully repeat bloom in subsequent years but not for Christmas.






Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8307

PostPosted: Mon May 15, 17 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Those are lovely Jam Lady. They don't bloom at Christmas here, but are usually given as a put with the bulb and compost in and then start to grow indoors from soon after I think. I have never had one, so don't really know. As I said, we don't grow them outside here, as they are regarded as house plants. Probably too wet or cool summer or something.

Had a quiet day yesterday after getting out to open the gate to the wood for a running race that was going through. Only had to be there for about half an hour, but it made it easier than them all using the kissing gate.

I did a bit of pottering in the garden, some watering, which turns out to have been unnecessary as it is raining today, and some more to my knitting. I was trying to work out a change in the pattern from a raglan to a set in sleeve, using another pattern and all in a Shetland lace design. Interesting. Think I have got it about right with any luck. It is very flexible anyway, so some imperfections should sort themselves out. I also need a non-patterned edge to ensure I have something to sew into, so need to make sure I get the right number of increases and decreases in each end pattern. Fun.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1292
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue May 16, 17 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Snap Jam Lady, I too am moving lots of bits of wood and timber that might come in, interesting grain is one of them. In some ways I have been lucky-the dreaded wood worm has struck-so it has had to go but some of the better pieces have almost had as many moves as I have! I used to take home 3"x2" timber 6ft1" long for the length of time a job was running-around 2 years- at 9 pieces a night and oh dear I still have them 9 years on, however i have to build another shed as the building I have had put up is too small, at least I have enough for a complete frame for a shed about 12 ft. square.

I hope the runners appreciated your gesture of opening the gate for them MR, and that they didn't leave any aftermath!

It is possible that the NZ Radiata pine is related as it sounds like the type of growth that the Portugese M.T. follows. I suspect that it is pretty fast too. We used it when the average diameter under bark would be around 6-7 inches, to give a reasonable yield from the tree as well as cover for the fence panel-using the least number of nails we could! Often there would be slats of 3", but that is life!

Today I have been able to log in to here, but can't do e mails as the council are being a bit over protective, but I suppose I can can see their point. It affected the library I in so much as they won't let emails in or out till they are sure that they are protected. This is a nuisance because I am going to the Smallholder Show at the weekend and want to know where to collect my ticket from, and parking slot on the camping area, hoping to sleep in my friend's trailer, they wash it after the pigs have gone out! I said it wouldn't make any difference, but they said they would wash it after me just the same! I will be back on into the library Thursday and hope all is clear by then; I go on Friday to help set up and perform on Saturday and Sunday and then help take it all down! And a day off on Monday to recover!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8307

PostPosted: Wed May 17, 17 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hope you manage to get e-mails all right soon Gregotyn. I can see their point, but they should be all right by now I would have thought as the infection is finished. Someone found the way to stop it spreading further thank goodness. Also hope you have a good time at the Smallholder show if we don't hear from you before.

We managed to empty the kiln and do 20 bags yesterday, so at least we have a bit sorted. We have an order for 10 bags, so they will hopefully go off this week. We also spent some time moving cut and split firewood in the store, as we had a couple of loads dumped that needed to go on the main heap. Good exercise if nothing else.

Weather here has gone from very dry to intermittently rainy. Everything damp in the woods now. Should be good for the garden and bring on the cabbages and leeks I planted out if the slugs and snails don't come out too.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1292
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu May 18, 17 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

No e-mails again today. Perhaps an over enthusiastic reaction to the crisis. I think they are worried for other things to be hacked outside of the health service. I would have thought that those who did the hacking could use, what are considerable skills, to make money legitimately. My computer skills are nil.
I have just been informed that we may be able to use the email service this afternoon, when they are hoping to be in the clear.

It is where I am going to sleep at the show that is the current issue. Rather than pitch a tent I was hoping to sleep in a friend's stock lorry which makes life easier-I have 2 tents one is to sleep only the other is for 6 people to live in and takes a lot of time to put up and take down. The small tent only allows me to lie down so getting changed in the morning and evening is hard work-an age thing- and cooking is a pain in that if it is raining. Wish I had sorted the caravan now! Such is life. I think I will just turn up anyway, something will happen.

We are in the same weather pattern as you MR., alternate sun and rain, but fairly warm. I hope the charcoal trade keeps running even if you are having some rain. I am assuming that when you say you are moving logs into the store, that they are going undercover from where they have been seasoning. I may be wrong but when I have done logging in the past I have cut the tree into lengths left them to dry a bit outside-3 or 4 months, then cut them into log lengths, split them and stack inside along the wall of an old cowshed This doesn't apply to ash as it burns anytime, but I still like to rest it a bit. Our ash trees are not showing any signs of life yet, the oaks have been coming into leaf for some time.
This intermittent rain has brought on the grass and several farmers have taken first cut silage, and I am seeing quite a few fields now well and truly shut up for the one cut silage makers.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1601
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu May 18, 17 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The weather has decided it is already time for summer. Mid-morning (10:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Saving Time) and it is already 30 degrees Celsius, with a predicted high of 33 C. In Fahrenheit terms that will be about 20 degrees warmer than normal.

Mistress Rose, local annual precipitation where I am is twice the annual precipitation of London, England. It is 46 inches inches / year over here, but only 23.5 inches / year in London, England.

The big difference, I believe, is that you get frequent dribbs and drabs of rain, plus lots of overcast. We can get heavy downpours, intense sunshine, and hotter summer weather than do you.

The hippeastrum are in pots, set outdoors with midday shade in summer.

Sister's surgery went well. She was sent home yesterday, could shower today, and I just got some pictures of her out shopping for produce in an outdoor display.

Now my break is about over - came in for something to drink and sit for a few minutes. Finish up with some repotting, tidy things away, then shower so I am again fit for human company - going on a garden visit this afternoon. Perhaps I'll take an umbrella to use as a parasol / sunshade . . .

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8307

PostPosted: Fri May 19, 17 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hope you find somewhere to sleep all right for the show Gregotyn. There must be some secluded animal stall under cover if all else fails. You might just get an e-mail in time if they will be available later.

We now have 40 bags ordered and probably more over the next week or two, so some more bagging to do from this firing and another firing next week.

I asked the farmer about the grass, as it is growing well again after the last silage cut and he said they would be taking a hay crop off it when it is ready. Another few weeks I should think, then by the looks of the way it is growing this year they may even get another crop off.

You do have a far more extreme climate than us Jam Lady. So far, although we have had the odd day where it has been 'shirtsleeves' weather, it hasn't been that warm. Better than last year, which was a very cold spring, but not too warm. Hope you have a good garden visit, and taking a sunshade seems an excellent idea. Sounds as if you get about as much rain as Gregotyn, but it doesn't get as warm in Wales. Glad to hear your sister is all right, and hope she doesn't need any more treatment.

Ended up having an odds and ends day yesterday, with a lot of cooking. Took some charcoal over to a new outlet, then came home, made some rhubarb fool, baked biscuits, and made a stew with the chicken carcase from the roast. Managed to find out where I was in my knitting, which was actually 4 rows on from where I thought I was, so back on track with that now too.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1601
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Fri May 19, 17 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The garden was, as always, lovely. The rhododendrons were superb. Mistress Rose, here's an image for you.



They are, however, Spanish bluebells.

Up at the crackers of dawn this morning and up on the roof to put the greenhouse shade cloth - one large piece - over the 4 side-by-side great room skylights. Virtuous woman that I am I even cleaned the skylights first. Also the outside of other windows only accessible from the roof. All this before my morning coffee too, as it had to be done before the sun was high enough to clear the trees and shine on that portion of the roof. It was 21 degrees Celsius when we got up there, 24 degrees Celsius when we came back in. Another hot day, I'm afraid.

Yesterday we put up the curtains for the bedroom skylights. They can be reached from in the room with a large ladder. Which Mr Poe cat likes to rapidly climb up but is slower coming down. Years ago I made muslin panels for each of the three skylights, that each have pockets on the two longer sides that hold spring tension curtain rods. Other than the ladder and threading the rods through the pockets they're easy to do. Look good and reduce solar heating.

More re-potting etc in the garden today. There's so much to do, in fact, that I've decided not to go on the garden club outing to a nursery next week. Their display gardens are said to be quite nice but my resistance to purchasing new plants is poor. And I have enough waiting to be dealt with as it is.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8307

PostPosted: Sat May 20, 17 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That bit of garden looks lovely Jam Lady. It would look even better with English bluebells, but I suppose you can't get them. Ours have been lovely this year. They kept their slightly purpley royal blue for ages, but now are over. It means the woods are less busy, but I love the sight of them.

We are doing a course today, so have to meet up with the 2 people on it and take them to the woods. I have the course notes sorted, so just have to get us all there and sorted out. Son is involved as well, and husband is firing the little kiln. The last firing didn't work as the seal had gone, so we ended up with mainly brown ends, so need to refire today.

Weather here is looking good; sunshine and should be fairly warm later, although I think it is a bit chilly now.

cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1451

PostPosted: Mon May 22, 17 5:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The show is not till the end of the month - meantime i have been knitting and spinning like a demon as I wanted to know what I had to enter before lodging my entries. It is two photographs, a skein each of Raw fleece, dyed tops, and alpaca, as well as two beanies, and some art yarn - I have entered two pieces and done three, so once they are all done I will have a choice of which to enter. Very busy as a result That a dodging the various bits of weather being thrown at us of late (lovely day today, freezing tomorrow), taking delivery of a new back awning and chasing the concreters to make the pads, entertaining the plumber, designing our 'shop front' entry at the History Room (we have a major art event in Hobart each year called Dark Mofo which is spreading its tentacles into the hinterlands this year, and our window display has to be red and illuminated), and working and doing various other things about the place .... well you get the picture.

This is the latest beanie and an entry into the Show - I am not blocking it this way any more - I discovered the best way to do them is on a dinner plate of the right diameter so that is what is happening now.




Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8307

PostPosted: Mon May 22, 17 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sounds as if you have been busy Cassandra. That hat is lovely. I think we would call that a tam o' shanter. Your spinning has come on really well if that is hand spun.

We ran a course on Basic Woodland Management on Saturday for two people. One wanted to just understand a bit more about woodland, and the other is interested in taking up coppicing or similar. He is currently working in forestry as a sub contractor, but wants to take his work further. They both got what they wanted out of the day, which was the main thing.

Yesterday I spent in the garden mainly planting things out. I got the mangetout peas, courgettes, squashes and sweetcorn out, then erected the bean sticks and got the French and runner beans planted out. It all took a lot of work as everything then had to be watered in, and the bean sticks, being hazel, weren't over co-operative. After I had finished I trimmed up the ends on my last basket and did a bit of scraping on a couple of spoons I have made that have dried now, then cooked a roast dinner. Husband decided to go to the woods and do a bit more painting and have a quiet time, so a busy and productive day for both of us.

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