Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
Crop rotation vs companion planting: very confused!
Page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own
Author 
 Message
LynneA



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 4770
Location: London N21
PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 07 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Think I better get working on adapting my college essay into an article......

Basically, it's generally agreed that crop rotation is essential and works. Companion Planting is at best random, but could be considered as part of a planting plan once a crop rotation plan has been worked out.

Lisa



Joined: 31 May 2005
Posts: 248
Location: Cheshire
PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 07 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

But coudl you rotate, say, your carrots and onions together? (I am developing a carrot/onion obsession since that is the example all the books use!)

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 07 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lisa wrote:
But coudl you rotate, say, your carrots and onions together? (I am developing a carrot/onion obsession since that is the example all the books use!)


You can if you like, but it would be important not to follow the same patch of ground with onions again (slightly less important with carrots, but still worth rotating).

Home on the Hill



Joined: 06 Feb 2005
Posts: 313
Location: Warwickshire
PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 07 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Experiments have shown that the carrot onion thing does work - but only if you have four rows of onions to every row of carrots. And it only works while the onions are actively growing. Since the whole point is to prevent carrot fly, just grow your carrots under horticultural fleece IF carrot fly is a problem - it may not be!

Most companion planting has not been scientifically proven and seems to be mostly anecdotal. Sort out the crop rotation first, add some pretty flowers to attract pollinating and pest-predating insects and take it from there.

Good luck!

Beth

starmoonlilly



Joined: 28 Oct 2006
Posts: 218
Location: Northampton
PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 07 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I use the carrot/onion rotation, it has worked. But you could plant Tagetes as well, only it may be a waste of valuable veggie space. Ive also interplanted with chives, garlic and leeks.

treaclepuss



Joined: 30 Aug 2006
Posts: 139

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 07 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You really need to keep onions well weeded - so not ideal to grow with carrots, in my opinion. I grow dill with carrots, it's strongly scented and not affected by rotation. I also like it and use lots

supersprout



Joined: 07 Jan 2007
Posts: 66

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 07 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Agree - organise major crop rotation (alliums, brassica and solanums) first. Then experiment with some companion planting if you like, and see what results you get.

We practice two sorts of companion planting on our veg plot:

1. Mixing veg that grow well together e.g. corn, beans and squash; carrots and tomatoes; celeriac and leeks; beetroot and kolrabi.

2. Interplanting with herbs and non-edible plants that repel predators and attract pollinating insects e.g. borage and runner beans; summer savory and beans; mint, nettles and tomatoes; sage and brassica. If you have beds, you can plant these at the end where the path is, and not lose cultivated space

The first year we planted summer savory in among the beans, and no flea beetle so carried on with tagetes and borage. This year we'll be even more adventurous. There's so much to learn, yay!

OtleyLad



Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 2224
Location: Otley, West Yorkshire
PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 07 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I had the same problem when I was writing my Vegetable Gardeners Almanac software (see my site). I had built into the program checks for crop rotation and then I bought Carrots love Tomatoes and Roses love Garlic by Louise Riotte - the companion planters guru. I tries to draw up a chart about what could be grown with what and what combinations to avoid. The material contradicted itself and it became clear that it was very inconsistent and impossible to follow. I gave up on trying to incorporate it in the program. As the author states 'Companion Planting is a Mystery'. Well, crop rotation is a science. 'nuf said.

VSS



Joined: 14 Jan 2007
Posts: 2831
Location: Llyn Peninsula, North Wales
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 07 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Good crop rotation is essential to avoid a build up of soil borne pests and diseases. It also help to balance the nutrient levels in the soil. It is vital for healthy soil, and without healthy soil, your crops will not flourish.

Companion planting is a nice idea, but seems to be aimed mostly at flying nasties attracted by the smell of their host plant (an oversimplification i know).

If you can do both, great and you are a better planner than i am. Always go for rotation above companions.

www.viableselfsufficiency.co.uk

AnneandMike



Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 890
Location: Over the hill and soon to be far away
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 07 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I like your site, Tim and Dot. Welcome to downsizer.

VSS



Joined: 14 Jan 2007
Posts: 2831
Location: Llyn Peninsula, North Wales
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 07 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Glad you like it.

Please tell your friends!!

www.viableselfsufficiency.co.uk

Gavin Bl



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 281
Location: Cardiff
PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 07 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I saw a TV program on growing your own veg the other night, that talked about companion planting, highlighting the '3 sisters' corn, beans and squash.

If I was to try and do that, and be a good rotator to boot, would they come under the legumes part of the cycle or what? cheers

yours in horticultural ignorance...

Gav

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22790
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 07 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gavin Bl wrote:
If I was to try and do that, and be a good rotator to boot, would they come under the legumes part of the cycle or what? cheers


Neither. It is such a hungry combination that you would have to grow it on your manure pile!

Gavin Bl



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 281
Location: Cardiff
PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 07 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Manure pile? Dear me.

Slash and burn it is then

cheers Judith

Gav

Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 18332
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 07 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I grow squash in among my sweetcorn, replacing a sweetcorn plant every metre. It allows the squash to trail over the ground around the sweetcorn. This is a good use of space but not necessarily companiion planting. I haven't added beans to the mix. It is possible but as pointed out is hungry.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com