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Leylandii
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john of wessex



Joined: 18 Jun 2007
Posts: 1831

PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 09 6:35 pm    Post subject: Leylandii Reply with quote    

At the bottom of my garden is, in effect a very overgrown leylandii or leylandii type hedge - some of the trees are now about 25 feet high.

While I have various issues over it, what does concern me is that a number of the trees have only very limited leaf cover, mostly towards the top.

Should I be concerned about the health of these trees?

Bluedog



Joined: 06 Jan 2009
Posts: 431
Location: Dartmoor
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 09 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

How do you mean?


Is it dying back?

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 3695
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 09 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Its the way they grow. Any branch that doesn't get enough light to earn its keep will be made redundant.

Leylandii do not regenerate from brown wood.

25ft is very short. They have a lot of growing to do.

If they are healthy (and they probably are) then I would be very concerned.

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8310
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 09 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

are they your trees? if so.. cut em down....

our neighbours have some.. they are about 80=-90 ft tall. every now and then on falls onto our land. ....

robin wood



Joined: 07 Jan 2009
Posts: 160

PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 09 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As said above, if you try to top them or reduce them in any way they will just look dead and brown and not regenerate in the way that a hardwood tree does, so you have to decide do you want a row of 100 foot trees there? They are now just getting well established and probably going at about 18" a year. Tree surgeons, love them, they will never go out of business so long as people keep planting leylandii.

JB



Joined: 08 Jun 2005
Posts: 7566
Location: 91 N
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 09 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

oldish chris wrote:
Leylandii do not regenerate from brown wood.


All firs can regenerate from brown wood but are reluctant to do so. Cut them back and if they don't regenerate then replace them with something real and slower growing.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 24687
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 09 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It does sound like the bottom branches are simply dying off naturally as the plants have been left to grow into trees rather than trimmed to keep them as a hedge.

If it's not that there has been some diseases that have started killing them off, this might be worth a look: http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profiles0301/cypress_aphid.asp

john of wessex



Joined: 18 Jun 2007
Posts: 1831

PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 09 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They arent my trees - thats the problem............


And the 'anti hedge' legislation doesnt seem to apply to them


Bluedog



Joined: 06 Jan 2009
Posts: 431
Location: Dartmoor
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 09 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

If you want Lleylandii to remain tight and uniform you have to keep them well topped out, and cutting them back to each years green growth will help with that.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 10778
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 09 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Leylandii are a hybrid created in the 60s.
Both parent species are capable of hitting 150'.
The oldest Leylandii are less than 50 years old, so nobody knows for certain how tall they can get...

They do make great hedges provided that you keep them trimmed regularly (2-3 times per year minimum).

snozzer



Joined: 19 Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Location: The Centre of Britian
PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 09 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Leylandii like any hedge have to have the correct shape to stop the thinning bottom problem. The shape you need is a pyramid i.e. wider at the base than the top, if you keep leylandii trimmed to this shape and take the tops of they make excellent hedges, a real haven for nesting birds and a warm roost in the winter. The problem is when people let them get out of hand.

I have seen really tall ones regenerated by cutting down to 6-8ft tall, the trick is to add a good fertilizer around the roots about now and then top them off at the desired height. As the spring comes and the sap rises with warmer temperatures and longer days they can often regenerate. However, they also may never recover and you end up with a row of posts...

shaunb



Joined: 12 Sep 2008
Posts: 169
Location: Ruthin, Wales
PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 09 12:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Kill the leylandii by poisoning them, use a glyphosate product.

john of wessex



Joined: 18 Jun 2007
Posts: 1831

PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 09 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Anyone got any live Cypress Aphid I can have??

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 10778
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 09 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
Leylandii are a hybrid created in the 60s.

Actually that's not true. They were actually discovered in the late 19th Century.
Quote:
Both parent species are capable of hitting 150'.
<snip> nobody knows for certain how tall they can get...

That bit is true. The tallest known specimines are in Kew and still growing at 130'

Blue Sky



Joined: 30 Jan 2005
Posts: 7618
Location: France
PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 09 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
Leylandii are a hybrid created in the 60s.

Actually that's not true. They were actually discovered in the late 19th Century.
Quote:
Both parent species are capable of hitting 150'.
<snip> nobody knows for certain how tall they can get...

That bit is true. The tallest known specimines are in Kew and still growing at 130'


Are you arguing with yourself?

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