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Coppice trees
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wellington womble



Joined: 08 Nov 2004
Posts: 14811
Location: East Midlands
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:07 pm    Post subject: Coppice trees  Reply with quote    

So, it turns out ash has some dieback disease that means there is a ban on transporting ash saplings.

What else can I coppice for firewood in a small acreage? Willow burns too fast and is horribly invasive. Sweet chestnut may not grow (others have had limited success locally) and oak takes far too long.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43942
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hazel?

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think most quick growing trees are going to produce a less dense wood and thus a bit quicker burning.

Something like alder would be good, quick growing, nitrogen fixing and coppiceable.

I wouldn't rule out willow if you're coppicing as you'll be keeping it in check buy coppicing it.

Beech and hornbeam might be worth a go, not as quick as some but the beech on my woodland has grown quicker than oak. It does seem susceptible to disease though.

Hazel does produce good sized firewood eventually, worth adding some for it's other uses.

I would look round the area to see what does well there.

Edit to add, I wouldn't rule out sycamore or field maple.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43942
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Field maple definitely, lime's done well here too, as has Italian alder. I guess it's better to have a mix. Our quickest growing trees have all been stone fruits, cherries and plums seem to love it here. Might be worth planting some wild cherries that could be grubbed up at year 5 or 6?

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8404
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sycamore.

Nicky Colour it green



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 8617
Location: Devon, uk
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

what is the ground like? if it is watery then I would go for alder and willow - both are doing well in our 'woodland' at the bottom of the field - advantage of willow is dead easy to make new ones, just shove sticks in the ground and they take.
We cut our first proper (small) alder logs 4 years after planting tinysaplings

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14817
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is it the ban on movement that is stopping you, or fear of the disease?
If the former, then are there no ash in the area that you can get seed from?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32959
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

hazel will burn but isnt ideal and it will take a few years to get any useful wood, beech is a bit slower but will coppice and burns sort of ok sweet chestnut is ace fuel

could you look out for some ash seeds this autumn ?but cos of the dieback problem a mixed planting might be sensible

does it have to be coppice or would a yearly planting in the gaps be ok?

if so there are quite a few fast growers that make a decent firewood

birch is ok fuel.larch is quite hot but some of the other pines are better.prob at least ten years to make harvesting worth while

i would go for a mixed planting(some whips but plenty of seed quite close spaced and start by using thinnings and first cuts as fuel ,that way you might have some useful stuff from about 5 years on and a sustainable managed woodland some years later

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13489

PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Willow is invasive, that's why its so good for coppicing. We cut half a dozen willows right down at the beginning of the year and there's already loads of regrowth shot up from the old stumps.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32959
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

re sycamore and maple they burn ok but need a long seasoning

willow needs several years seasoning or it will coke the flue very quickly

horrid to work with but blackthorn burns well and makes super charcoal

if you are wanting a quick supply of fuel using a kiln (oil drum etc) to make char wood from coppice will cut out the seasoning time

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8414
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
re sycamore and maple they burn ok but need a long seasoning




I find that sycamore seasons quickly. Plus its easy to cut & split when green. Also worth mentioning that as the stems are long & straight its easy to handle as well.


Fell it in the winter, cut & split it as soon as you can even into the summer & it will be ready for the following winter.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yep, I've burnt a fair bit of sycamore and found it seasoned very quickly. I would regard it similar to ash. I've also found hazel good to burn.

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2693

PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:

if you are wanting a quick supply of fuel using a kiln (oil drum etc) to make char wood from coppice will cut out the seasoning time


About ten years ago I put an article on here with photo's regarding charcoal making from willow.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43942
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Lloyd wrote:
dpack wrote:

if you are wanting a quick supply of fuel using a kiln (oil drum etc) to make char wood from coppice will cut out the seasoning time


About ten years ago I put an article on here with photo's regarding charcoal making from willow.


Have we been around 10 years?

Lloyd



Joined: 24 Jan 2005
Posts: 2693

PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 14 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Well, nine or ten? I shall look for the linky.

Edited to add: found the link but can't recall how to do the linky fairy thing:

http://www.downsizer.net/Articles/Make_your_own/A_failed_first_attempt_at_making_charcoal/

Last edited by Lloyd on Fri Aug 01, 14 5:31 pm; edited 1 time in total

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