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Hedge trimming
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tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:38 pm    Post subject: Hedge trimming  Reply with quote    

We've got 200 metrs of established hedging, mainly hawthorn, Rich the tractor says he usually cuts it around August, I don't like the idea of that, surely the berries etc should be left over winter?

When should I let him cut it?

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'd definetly do it in the dorment season.

How well is it laid? If it's not that well laid then get it laid properly early next year.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not been laid, I haven't got time to do it and I don't know how much it'd cost

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There were a few people who do such things knocking about a while back. Can't remember who though.

judith



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 22789
Location: Montgomeryshire
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is the hedge affecting visibility on any roads? If not, I would see if you can leave it until the winter.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:46 pm    Post subject: Re: Hedge trimming Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
We've got 200 metrs of established hedging, mainly hawthorn, Rich the tractor says he usually cuts it around August, I don't like the idea of that, surely the berries etc should be left over winter?

When should I let him cut it?


In that case there is a very short window at the end of winter/before spring, before they start nesting (if the ground is dry enough to get on).

Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 18995
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

http://www.englishplants.co.uk/trees.html

Once your hedge is established, trim it every third year - but never trim during nesting season (1 March to 1 September). In fact, it is an offence under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to intentionally destroy a nest that is used or being used. It is more ideal to trim in February to allow the nuts and berries to be available for a longer period to birds and mammals.

http://www.heritagecouncil.ie/publications/hedgerow/contents.html
1. Hedges should be cut while they are dormant, from the beginning of September to the end of February (Section 46 Wildlife Act 2000).


the RHS refers to summer pruning on roads and tracks without verges but only to maintain access.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Hedge trimming Reply with quote    

Rob R wrote:
In that case there is a very short window at the end of winter/before spring, before they start nesting (if the ground is dry enough to get on).


Ground condition not an issue, there's a bit of tarmac runs alongside it.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Behemoth wrote:
Once your hedge is established, trim it every third year


I'd love to do that but it's the access to our house and the neighbours, I reckon by spring of year 2 you'd be scratching car paintwork.

So End of February should do it?

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:50 pm    Post subject: Re: Hedge trimming Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
Rob R wrote:
In that case there is a very short window at the end of winter/before spring, before they start nesting (if the ground is dry enough to get on).


Ground condition not an issue, there's a bit of tarmac runs alongside it.


Then, as Behemoth has been so kind as to quote the bits I couldn't be bothered to look up

Gervase



Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 8655

PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As Behemoth has pointed out, hedging is a winter occupation. Forget about it until the first frosts, and preferably leave it until at least the end of January. You're also less likely to traumatise the plants that make up your hedge by waiting until they're fully dormant.
How does your tractor man cut it? If you ever want to lay the hedge, flail cutters might not be the best idea. They are quick, however.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gervase wrote:
How does your tractor man cut it? If you ever want to lay the hedge, flail cutters might not be the best idea. They are quick, however.


He likes quick, in fact he loves quick. He'd never do a job by a slower means, not under any circumstance.

He flails it, how should it be trimmed for laying?

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gervase wrote:
If you ever want to lay the hedge, flail cutters might not be the best idea. They are quick, however.


Flails are never the best idea, but as you point out, they are quick & mulch all the trimmings. If the hedge is too established & they are used to cut back rather than trim, you are in stump grinding territory & not only is it not good for the plant, it looks awful.

Rob R



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 31902
Location: York
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
He flails it, how should it be trimmed for laying?


By hand, chainsaw, reciprocating knife (he'll look as you funny if you ask him if he's got one) or circular saw blade.

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 06 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
... how should it be trimmed for laying?


You need to make sure you have some tall, thick, vertical branches so they can be partly chopped and flattened. I think the recommended is about a pole (5.5 yards). That gives you the ability to get a few layers deep at any point.

You could probably get away with flailing the sides as long as you get good verical growth from ground level.

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