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New shed

 
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jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26564
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 4:14 pm    Post subject: New shed  Reply with quote    

I'm looking to put up an 10x7 shed that will be used as a utility room, a place for brewing, kitchen craft type things, and last but not least a place for the tumble dryer, it doesn't get used much, but currently its where we want the atmosphere to stay dry.
I'm planning on using stuff like this:
https://www.dbsbathrooms.co.uk/swish-marbrex-whitestone-large-bathroom-cladding#.VxUF8yYy1hE
to add a bit of insulation and make it non shed like inside.
I'm a bit stuck on what shed to go for?
I've rejected cheap and nasty, and also summer house log cabin type things as they are way over budget.
The two options at the moment are:
http://www.shedsworld.co.uk/p/Strongman_10ft_x_7ft_%282.95m_x_2.05m%29_Heavy_Duty_Loglap_Workshop.htm
and
http://www.tigersheds.com/product/tiger-heavyweight-workshop-shed/
One has 16mm walls, the other 12mm.
I see this mostly being used outside of the winter months, and as I say I will be adding a little more insulation anyway.
So I'm tending to the view that 12mm is decent enough.
Any opinions folks?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33026
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

go for the thicker walls

both will need a proper felting job with mastic to stay dry for more than a year or so

both will require extra ventilation(drill holes under the eaves and secure with flyscreen mesh)

both will require extra trusses to be able to use the overhead space for storage of long things.

both will need wood treatment or paint every few years.

if you have a boy dog an exterior ply "target" strip around the lower part of the walls helps to prevent "erosion"

both will require a decent base(min 300 mm well bumped hardcore topped with flags or concrete) to prevent wonkyness which causes doors to stick corners to open etc etc .

both will need rat proofing underneath

both will require extra timbers for fitting shelves etc ( even the thicker walls are too thin to hold anything but cuphooks for light things.

do the electrics properly bearing in mind tumble dryers need quite a few amps as do power tools ,kettle or hotplate for brewing works etc(armoured cable is the easiest option and will mate up to a waterproof plug unit,wall glands ,rcd unit etc etc )

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33026
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the used shipping container is a very adaptable bit of kit and although has a few difficulties it does avoid most of the ones i mention above.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26564
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Well I was thinking free standing racking, as you say those walls either size are not made for hanging things on.
It is going on decking rather than the ground, so I think the floor will be reasonably protected.
The ceiling space won't be used for storage, the aim is for a nice clean work area.
Electrics will be as you say, I have a spare slot in the main fuse box lined up for this.

jema
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 26564
Location: escaped from Swindon
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
the used shipping container is a very adaptable bit of kit and although has a few difficulties it does avoid most of the ones i mention above.


http://www.portablespace.co.uk/product/3m-x-21m-flatpacked-store-powder-coated

is interesting I have to admit, but price is painful.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33026
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

good there is a spare slot re electrics.

free standing racks are ok and will only need a plank under the feet to spread the load.

so long as the decking is stable and flat i would think it should be a reasonable base for a shed if the deck planks are at 90 degrees to the shed floor joists.if it is very wonky when you put a level and strait edge to it to check using 3 sheets of roofing board might be handy to give a flat level base, using the shims under the boards rather than direct under the joists which makes the thing stand on tip toe instead of flat footed.

ps they are fairly easy to put together and judging by the state of our one a diy job is likely to be better than an installer stapling the felt on for instance

pps adding plenty of mastic and a layer of heavy duty felt to a new shed will avoid having to do major roof repairs in a few years,run the extra felt over the soffits as water getting behind them is a main cause of rot in the roof timbers.(as is damp see note on extra ventilation)

Behemoth



Joined: 01 Dec 2004
Posts: 18995
Location: Leeds
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Self build?

Ship lap is about £13m2 and treated battens about £1 a metre. Or buy the stuff and pay s chippy to do it for you?

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 16 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Beware internet sheds - I've known them delivered needing FULL assembly.
Try your local independent fencing/shed supplier............

10 x 7 Apex, Standard framing (IIRC 50x32(and at 450centres)) £550

10 x 8 Apex, Heavy framing (IIRC 90 x 48 (450 centres)) £760 .....
......Construction is a bit more crude, but are well solid sheds.
Comes as 7 panels - bangs together in minutes - Finishing touches aren't as good, but nothing hard to sort. 12mm T+G roof and floor

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8910

PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 16 6:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We have a couple of those metal flatpack containers and they are very good. Main problem with them is condensation, so you would have to be very careful about insulation. We mainly use them for storage, but also as a small workshop.

We are also looking at these. They seem very solid and there might be something within your budget. http://www.skinnerssheds.co.uk/

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21297
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 16 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

10ft shipping container (if you can get it into situ) then clad in whatever for aesthetics.

http://adaptainer.co.uk/10ft-container/

john of wessex



Joined: 18 Jun 2007
Posts: 2115

PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 17 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't know where you are these days (Not Swindon) but I got my mini barn from these & its ace

They have several buildings 'on display' on their site

http://charltonstimberstore.com/product-category/timber-sheds/

derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 702
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 17 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've had a 13x7 tantalised pent from these people

http://www.beastsheds.co.uk/contact

Very well made free delivery and erection and a 10 year guarantee. Very nice people to deal with I sent photo and measurements and they made it to go through my car port.

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