Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
Screwdriver recommendations please?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Make Your Own/DIY
Author 
 Message
Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 9:17 am    Post subject: Screwdriver recommendations please?  Reply with quote    

My woodwork projects are getting bigger, and I find my dinky electric screwdriver is not up to the job. (8cm screws into timber)
Are those push type screwdrivers any good or should I go straight for a big electric one like the professionals use? Or can I just stick a screw bit into a normal drill?

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33710
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Does your normal drill work at low speed? Screwing at 20,000 rpm is awkward.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21297
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You can use a normal drill on slow speed but unless it has a slipper clutch, as found on most battery powered hand drills, you may find you screw head gets chewed up when you drive them fully home. It's doable if you're careful.

Push type screw drivers are fine if the holes are predrilled to the correct size.

Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks both.
It is variable speed, but I wasn't sure if it would need what vegplot said as well, and I don't know if it has that or not. I'll give it a go, carefully.
The push type sounds like the way to go for me, as, even if it doesn't work for these long screws, it will be ok for the smaller stuff like fixing cladding, and it will be more reliable than the little electric ones.

Problem now, is finding one from a reliable or indeed any local supplier. I guess they are out of fashion.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A drill/driver will have numbers next to the chuck and a rotating dial to adjust the torque setting - low for small screws high for large. Possible another rotating dial with a picture of a drill and a screw.

The push type can take a bit of getting used to.

If you decide to buy a drill/driver, the Lidl ones might be worth looking at next time they're in, at least they come with a 3yr warranty and most people seem to like them for what they are.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33083
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

the push sort are ok but as above need pre drilling even with modern screws.i used to have a stanley one about 50 cm long un extended which did the job and didnt break in the ten years i had it before it got nicked.

i now use a pro quality battery drill ,set on slow with the adjustable clutch set to suit the materials(3 for plasterboard ,20 for marine ply etc etc)

if you do a lot and value your time i recon a good battery drill is best and pays for itself in time quite quickly

milwarkee are ace but some of the top of the mid range stuff is ok and if you shop around there are bargains to be had .if spending around the £100 mark makita have some decent ones ,look for high torque and all metal gearing,for a bit over twice that go for milwarkee 28 v kit(tis very nice stuff) and ideal for a lot of heavy use

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4783
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I love my makita lithium ion cordless drill and impact driver set

onemanband



Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 1473
Location: NCA90
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Woodburner wrote:

Problem now, is finding one from a reliable or indeed any local supplier. I guess they are out of fashion.

I found this Plenty for sale on ebay tho.

I've not seen a Yankee used on site for 15-20 years.

Makita Li-ion is great stuff. Batteries hold charge for an unbelievable time and are durable. The drills themselves aren't the toughest, but good enough for a years professional abuse or a decade of DIY.

Impact drivers are good for big screws.

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21297
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Woodburner wrote:
Thanks both.
It is variable speed, but I wasn't sure if it would need what vegplot said as well, and I don't know if it has that or not. I'll give it a go, carefully.
The push type sounds like the way to go for me, as, even if it doesn't work for these long screws, it will be ok for the smaller stuff like fixing cladding, and it will be more reliable than the little electric ones.

Problem now, is finding one from a reliable or indeed any local supplier. I guess they are out of fashion.


If you're fixing cladding I would use nails, galvanised if outdoors or using oak boards.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33083
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

choosing the right screws is also important,for most jobs i use the sort that cut their own hole into softwoods(and through most materials) such as turbogold ,the hex head stuff is ok but rather expensive for the extra ease.

the old style tapered ones are a nightmare of pilot hole drills etc etc but they can have some advantages in a few situations such as fastening thin delicate materials to a frame with domes or flanged cheeseheads.

Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't need it much, just once in a while for a chicken coop, or shed repair. I'm currently building a wood store, working my way up to a maximum permitted development sized workshop! (One day!)

I've used Torx-fast for a few jobs now. I'm used to pre-drilling. Even when the packet says no pilot hole required, that just makes me think "Eh? Where's the stuff going to go?" There's more reasons to drill pilot holes than just getting the screw in.
eta I've ordered one of these http://www.axminster.co.uk/spiral-ratchet-screwdriver-500mm-bits

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33083
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 15 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

you will find that lubricating it with a soft graphite pencil by rubbing it up and down the spirals is good.using oil is messy and it will clag up with dust/oil clags.

i did rather like my one .

Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 15 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Good tip! Thanks

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1461
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 15 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I bought a Milwarkee and find it doesn't do as well as I hoped-£400 for the drill and screwdriver and my old Makita is far superior for all functions and as said, it holds charge for ages-kept outside and goes after 3 months idle-best one I ever bought. I only buy battery operated as you can do what you want and importantly where you want, and with a spare battery when you want!

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33083
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 15 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

is it a 18 or 28v model,i find my 28v very nice

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Make Your Own/DIY All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright © 2004 marsjupiter.com

<-- -->