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Fragrant climber for clay
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tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 9:44 am    Post subject: Fragrant climber for clay  Reply with quote    

I need a pretty, not hugely rampant fragrant climber to ramble up my stock proof fencing (5ft), I don't want it to grow too dense or it'll be shading part of my veg plot, any ideas?

bernie-woman



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7824
Location: shropshire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Do you want it to be there all year as in evergreen or not?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not necessarily, just something that'll stop the place looking like a maximum security prison

bernie-woman



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7824
Location: shropshire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What about climbing roses - lovely fragrance and not too dense

I can recommend David Austin Roses http://www.davidaustinroses.com/english/ - they will be able to tell you exactly which species to go for for your conditions

Other than that there are plenty of climbers that will do well on clay soil but finding ones that are not too dense and with a fragrance could be difficult. Passionflower is good on clay- can be fairly vigorous but can be hacked away at without hurting it

Lonicera (honeysuckle) would do ok and is not too vigorous and can be pruned in the spring to shape and has fragrance

Hydrangea anomala petiolaris (lovely white lacy caps of flowers) no fragrance I don't think but can grow quite densely but yet again can be pruned

Clematis - loads to choose from - not too dense but not many with massive fragrance

Wisteria - has fragrance but can take ages to flower

Lathyrus latifolius (everlasting sweet pea) - has no scent but masses of pink and sometimes white flowers and you can just hack away at it if it gets too big in a season


If it were me I would go for some roses with some clematis and perhaps a bit of everlasting sweet pea

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Honeysuckle needs freer draining doesn't it?

I was thinking roses but maybe not highly bred ones, Sweet Briar, Dog Rose???

What do we think?

I like sweet peas, but I'd never plant a non functional plant that wasn't fragrant, it's just not in my nature..

Bernie66



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
Posts: 13967
Location: Eastoft
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I am a fan of the everlasting peas, like sweet peas but not as vigorous and they come back yearly



http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/everlasting_pea.htm

Probably not the same ones as in my parents garden but similar.
That's more like it
http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/4153.shtml

Last edited by Bernie66 on Thu Apr 06, 06 10:31 am; edited 1 time in total

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bernie66 wrote:
I am a fan of the everlasting peas, like sweet peas but not as vigorous and they come back yearly


No fragrance...

Bernie66



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
Posts: 13967
Location: Eastoft
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Doh

bernie-woman



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7824
Location: shropshire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
Honeysuckle needs freer draining doesn't it?



Not according to the RHS - mine is planted in heavy soil - just chucked some rubble in the bottom of the hole and it is still with me after 6 years

David Austins do wild roses and their hybrids

Regarding function of plants you said you wanted it for screening therefore it is functional to some degree but if you can it would be worth getting fragrance as well

moongoddess



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 673

PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have a honeysuckle in clay soil. Although it is supposed to prefer freer draining soil it is doing ok. I wouldn't say it is *thriving* but it manages and is surviving alright. As you don't want anything too thick to crowd out the veggies it might be just what you're looking for.

The clematis does very well but has gotten very thick and dense............

I'm a rose fan though, so that would be my personal preference......('Compassion' for an outstanding fragrance - imho)

Have fun deciding!

mg x

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

bernie wrote:
Regarding function of plants you said you wanted it for screening therefore it is functional to some degree but if you can it would be worth getting fragrance as well


POint taken, but it's more aesthetics than strutcural or edible, not something I normally do, fragrance would soften the blow for me

moongoddess



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 673

PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Oh, just re-read one of your posts. You probably wouldn't like compassion - too highly bred, perhaps...........

Sorry.
mg x

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

bernie wrote:
David Austins do wild roses and their hybrids


Rosa Canina 11.25 I paid 0.29 for mine in the hedge...

bernie-woman



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 7824
Location: shropshire
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
bernie wrote:
David Austins do wild roses and their hybrids


Rosa Canina 11.25 I paid 0.29 for mine in the hedge...


I didn't say they were cheap there has to be some difference in size of plant surely for that price - I only recommended them as the nursery is about half a mile from us and they are always being quoted on Gardeners World and I have used then to get roses for specific occasions such as a ruby wedding etc..- the Austins live in a huge mansion - I can see how now

Could you not have fanned apple trees up the side of the fences

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43953
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 06 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

bernie wrote:
Could you not have fanned apple trees up the side of the fences


Must be some difference in the plants offered, but obviously the place I bought from is dealing in bulk seed grown plants for hedging. Just spoke to him and he recommended Rosa canina and Lonicera japonica, he's still got stock of both too, so that's lovely and fragrant, and cheap as chips...29p for the rose 1.60 for the honeysuckle

Re apple trees I've already got 198 going in, and haven't got the time to faff around training trees (unfortunately, cos they are beatifl as cordons)

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