Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
Laying blocks.
Page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Land Management
Author 
 Message
Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33696
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 9:19 am    Post subject: Laying blocks.  Reply with quote    

No, not a constipated chicken, but breeze blocks.

I'm building a few raised beds for herbs and such, and someone's nicked my DIY book.

Can anyone tell me what cement to sand ratio I should use for block laying mortar and how much cement I need for a square metre of blocks, please?

Ta.

sally_in_wales
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 20809
Location: sunny wales
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

ooh, good thread. I'm trying to summon the time and energy to put some shallow terraces across my sloping garden and also will probably be using breezeblock. So I'm interested too!

pricey



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Posts: 6378

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I always use 6 to 2, weather they are concrete or thermo's, this always gives a good solid bond, don't forget the feb mix ( fairy liquid will do.

As for how much per ? I just add the blocks and think 10 bags cement, 1/2 ton of sand, sorry I cant help more on that but someone will.

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

You mean there's ratios and things? I just buy bags of instant motar and go for it - if I need more I go back; never ended up with too much.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33696
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Doesn't instant mortar work out far more expensive, or is the price so low it's irrelevant?

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nickhowe wrote:
Doesn't instant mortar work out far more expensive, or is the price so low it's irrelevant?


I does, but I usually only use 4 or 5 bags at a time, and I don't have much space to be mixing stuff in.
I also meant ready-mix, rather then instant.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33696
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

http://www.borpin.co.uk/sbfaq/faq51041.htm#Heading102

All my answers at once.

Sally, what's your excuse now?

In fact, that link's homepage appears to be a useful guide for self-builders. I haven't studied it much, but...

sally_in_wales
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 06 Mar 2005
Posts: 20809
Location: sunny wales
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

nickhowe wrote:


Sally, what's your excuse now?

...


Is knitting frenzy an excuse? Mostly I need to find a week that I can take off and simultaneously bribe a few friends to come play by offering vast amounts of food and homebrew! (any volunteers?)

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

pricey wrote:
I always use 6 to 2


Thats 3 of building sand to 1 of cement? Isn't that a bit strong, I thought a mix of 6 to 1 or 5 to 1 was used for brick laying?

Bernie66



Joined: 14 Jan 2005
Posts: 13967
Location: Eastoft
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
pricey wrote:
I always use 6 to 2


Thats 3 of building sand to 1 of cement? Isn't that a bit strong, I thought a mix of 6 to 1 or 5 to 1 was used for brick laying?


Five to one is what I would go for, not too sure whether its correct in building terms. And it might need to be stronger if you are supporting earth in raised beds I guess.

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23924
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
pricey wrote:
I always use 6 to 2


Thats 3 of building sand to 1 of cement? Isn't that a bit strong, I thought a mix of 6 to 1 or 5 to 1 was used for brick laying?


3:1 for your founds, 6:1 for your walls

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I spose a raised bed is like foundations so 3:1 then.

Anyone used lime in the mix, 6:1:1?

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
I spose a raised bed is like foundations so 3:1 then.

Anyone used lime in the mix, 6:1:1?


You offering to supply some?

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Northern_Lad wrote:
Treacodactyl wrote:
I spose a raised bed is like foundations so 3:1 then.

Anyone used lime in the mix, 6:1:1?


You offering to supply some?


I would have to burn the chalk to make the lime. I've used building lime and it makes the mortar easier to work with and, I gather, the walls better able to cope with slight movement.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33029
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu May 11, 06 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i would use 6:1 good bricklaying sand and portland cement as it has good frost resistance .lime is unneccessary with that mix for blocklaying outside and feb or washing up liquid can make the mortar far too plastic (ie the wall squashes out its mortar with its own weight as you try to lay blocks )cut most of your halves (or quints ) before you mix so as to get a through run of laying without stopping to re start the 12" disc saw .careful with them they can bite .
string and level make tradesmen good .practice makes them fast so smallish mixes and take your time . mortar is only really at its best for about half an hour .
there are really good "systems" that make the job a bit like lego but i think they are quite dear .
put ties in especially the corners .
and remember to wet your blocks and to wet down( or cover in wet sacking ) your walls for a week or two . cement mortar only sets properly when it is wet ,if it drys before it sets it is just dirty sand .
my favourite tip is "make sure someone knows how to mix good mortar "
for shovel mixing ,on a plastic spot or 8x4 board ;
thouroughly dry mix the sand and cement then add water (with maybe a drop of washing up liquid per bucket) to a hole in the middle of the heap and then wet mixing by circling the heap ,turning a few shovelfuls into the wet crater and then cutting them until i have been round the heap ,then turning and shaking out for another circle and then in again .
add more water during this process until a "high peak "is left when your tool leaves the mix .( practice )
repeat until mixed .
have a brew .(5 mins )
cut, turn and cut again
then "knock up " to remove the air bubbles,( push it about on a board )
now its ready .
wet cement is quite caustic so barrier creme and good h n s practice is worthwhile . keep an eyewash bottle handy .
i love the smell of wet mortar in the mornings , it smells of , nearly breakfast time

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Land Management All times are GMT
Page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com

<-- -->