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Hedges again
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tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 11:37 am    Post subject: Hedges again  Reply with quote    

Got another 500mtrs of hedging to do this winter, this is alongside the orchard planting, which means that we can't use hawthorn or crab apples (disease issues) so I'm looking at:

50% hornbeam
25% holly
plus spindle, hazel, and cherry plum.

I've gone for hornbeam and hazel as theyu seem to be really healthy in our existing hedgerow, any thoughts anyone?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33033
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

holly needs clipping to get a good growth rate and dense bush
hazel is nice for layed hedging
is spindle toxic?
maybe gorse as a spikey barrier ?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
holly needs clipping to get a good growth rate and dense bush
hazel is nice for layed hedging
is spindle toxic?
maybe gorse as a spikey barrier ?


Bum, spindle is toxic (berries), does well round here.

Gorse sounds like a good idea:

"The flower buds are pickled in vinegar and then used like capers in salads"

N fixer too.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33033
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

gorse is the worst plant ive ever crawled through
makes barriers very secure and a gorse flower salad is splendid

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

dpack wrote:
gorse flower salad is splendid


Something to look forward to.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8405
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Holly is very slow growing as a young plant & will probably be cost restrictive to plant larger pot grown plants. To establish in a hedge they would need to be well branched 3-4 feet high. Beech makes a good hedge. Gorse will grow anywhere. Lovely scent to the flowers.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

TAVASCAROW wrote:
To establish in a hedge they would need to be well branched 3-4 feet high.


So not a good idea? I was thinking that it'd eventually make it's way through.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The occasional field maple is most pleasant in a hedge.

How about having some gooseberry, juniper and japanese quince in there? The odd one dotted into the hedge gives you an extra harvest for no effort.

The combination of beech and hornbeam would be gorgeous.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

cab wrote:
The combination of beech and hornbeam would be gorgeous.


worried about beech establishing, the odd gooseberry sounds like an idea

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Will do some field maple, wouldn't juniper be too slow growing?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

re juniper:

"Habitat Chalk downs in S. England but only where there is least sunshine and most rain, heaths, moors, pine and birch woods in the north of Scotland on acid peat, often dominant on chalk, limestone and slate."

Doesn't sound too promising.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8405
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The holly would hold its own but would probably take 20 years to become efective as a hedge. If you have a polytunnel & a cheap source of young plants, pot them up in 4 litre pots & grow on in the tunnel for a couple of years. They will put on a foot to 18" in one year.
Out doors you will be lucky to get 6" of growth on a young plant.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

TAVASCAROW wrote:
The holly would hold its own but would probably take 20 years to become efective as a hedge. If you have a polytunnel & a cheap source of young plants, pot them up in 4 litre pots & grow on in the tunnel for a couple of years. They will put on a foot to 18" in one year.
Out doors you will be lucky to get 6" of growth on a young plant.


Hopefully the body (especially if I incorporate field maple) will be filled quite quickly, so slow growth is OK, as long as it does keep making some growth. I'd probably reduce the amount of holly to somewhere nearer 10% in view of your comments then.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
re juniper:

"Habitat Chalk downs in S. England but only where there is least sunshine and most rain, heaths, moors, pine and birch woods in the north of Scotland on acid peat, often dominant on chalk, limestone and slate."

Doesn't sound too promising.


Too dry then... Shame. Unless, of course, its a hedge going across one of the wet patches, then it could be worth a punt.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43954
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 06 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

So it's looking like this:

Hornbeam 50%
Gorse 10%
Holly 10%
Hazel 10%
Field Maple 10%
Cherry Plum 10%

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