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Kiln drying timber
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tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44790
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:32 am    Post subject: Kiln drying timber Reply with quote
    

We're going to go for a fruit and nut floor through the hall and living room, basically end grain blocks of various fruit and nut timbers, this'll mean sourcing the trees, getting them milled (green), air drying and then kiln drying before final milling. I'm fairly confident that we can get hold of the right trees (anyone getting rid of any fruit or nut trees this winter?) and a mobile saw mill, but not so sure about the drying/kilning, anyone ever dealt with these kind of things?

This is what end grain blocks look like:

https://www.kaswell.com/woodblock/end_grain.htm

We're looking at 4x4x1" blocks

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Hmm, drying can take some time, but I guess that's why you're going for environmental rape method of kiln drying.

Traditionally seasoned wood is given a year per inch diameter to allow it shrink without shakes or splits.

You could maybe speed things up if you cut things down to, say, 2" square sections. These would probably warp during drying, but as you're only after 4" lengths you should be able to trim them up nicely.

It's a nice idea - be great to see it. Are you going to let the girls lay it?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44790
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

1" lengths, the blocks are 4" square

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44790
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Northern_Lad wrote:
Hmm, drying can take some time, but I guess that's why you're going for environmental rape method of kiln drying.

Traditionally seasoned wood is given a year per inch diameter to allow it shrink without shakes or splits.


Shakes aren't a huge issue, I don't know if you can achieve 8% moisture by natural drying, can't be easy.

Jonnyboy



Joined: 29 Oct 2004
Posts: 23956
Location: under some rain.
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Do you plane them after fitting?

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

tahir wrote:
1" lengths, the blocks are 4" square


Oh, that's going to be much tougher. Problem is, the wider the diameter, the more stress there is from differential drying which creates shakes and the such like. You'd need to get 6" diameter logs to make the 4" square (assuming no defects)

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44790
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Sand after fitting, you cut oversize (4.5x4.5") and then mill them to exact dims after drying

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25712
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

If you had the time solar kilns might be worth investigating. If not would it be worth phoning some of your local timber merchants to see if any kiln dry their own wood?

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44790
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Northern_Lad wrote:
tahir wrote:
1" lengths, the blocks are 4" square


Oh, that's going to be much tougher. Problem is, the wider the diameter, the more stress there is from differential drying which creates shakes and the such like. You'd need to get 6" diameter logs to make the 4" square (assuming no defects)


6" logs won't be an issue, I'd hope to get larger ones than that so the heartwood sits in different places, and like I say within reason shakes aren't a problem

vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21300
Location: Bethesda, Gwynedd
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I'd be inclined to wax the ends of full length timber and air dry for 2-3 years. You could try solar kiln drying to accelerate the process.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44790
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Haven't got 2-3 years, we're hopefully looking at moving in by next Christmas (well, maybe...)

Blacksmith



Joined: 25 Jan 2005
Posts: 5025
Location: Berkshire
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Microwave them.

Gill



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Have them professionally kiln dried. It isn't worth risking the wood by letting them air dry, especially if you've never done it before and don't know how suitable your storage is.

Gill

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44790
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Gill wrote:
Have them professionally kiln dried. It isn't worth risking the wood by letting them air dry, especially if you've never done it before and don't know how suitable your storage is.

Gill


That's what I'm thinking, but where? I've been given the number of a mill in Lincs that might do it but no response yet, any leads appreciated.

Gill



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 08 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

If you ask over on the UK Workshop Forum, Tahir, I'm sure someone will know of a convenient place where your timber can be kiln dried.

Gill

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