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Growing ransomes (wild garlic)
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Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 3:36 pm    Post subject: Growing ransomes (wild garlic) Reply with quote
    

Has anyone tried cultivating Ransomes, as opposed to merely taking advantage of it?

The bit that we have, originally came from woodland by a river, and was a bit slow to establish, I am kind of guessing that it prefers a damper situation, so I have transplanted some that was 'wandering' into the lawn, into the damper shady parts of my allotment.

Does anyone know if I stand a snowball's chance of it establishing there?

SarahB



Joined: 09 Sep 2007
Posts: 869
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Not a clue. I was given some, planted it in a random spot and it seemed to die, but it's come back again this year.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Should take okay. Does have a marginal preference for slightly acidic soil, but if its damp and shady it'll do okay I should think.

I've got it in the front and back gardens now, in the most inhospitable spots.

Ginkotree



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 2956
Location: south west wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Please could some one tell me what a ransome is

lettucewoman



Joined: 26 Sep 2006
Posts: 7834
Location: Tiptoe in the Forest!!
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Ginkotree wrote:
Please could some one tell me what a ransome is


it's wild garlic...the stuff that smells heavenly in the woods about this time of year long leaves and small white flowers. The leaves are yummy wilted into rice.

nettie



Joined: 02 Dec 2004
Posts: 5888
Location: Suffolk
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

This is one of those silly things that confuse me, I always thought it was ramsons, but I've seen them listed in various books as ransomes, ramsons, and ramsoms. The pedant in me wants to know which is correct

Anyhow they're delicious!

Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

cab wrote:
Should take okay. Does have a marginal preference for slightly acidic soil, but if its damp and shady it'll do okay I should think.

I've got it in the front and back gardens now, in the most inhospitable spots.

Thanks! That's what I was hoping to hear. There's a lot of shade on my lottie, so anything that grows well in shade and tastes yummy is a bonus. Nettles, ivy and bindweed were the only things there previously and the soil is slightly acidic, so hopefully next year I will have lots of extra yummy spinach substitute.

otatop



Joined: 01 Jun 2005
Posts: 1425
Location: North London
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Are they what I grow in my garden and know as garlic chives? (Leaves broader than ordinary chives, and with white flowers)

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25712
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

We grow ramsons in our veg garden. We bought some bulbs from a sustainable source and also gathered some seed from a local source.

I've also read it likes mildly acidic damp places but we first found it growing wild on a dry chalky slope. I've noticed that the bulbs we bought, although they grow fine, don't seem as vigorous as wild ones and I think that's down to the fact it's growing on free-draining chalky soil. The plants we've grown from local seed seem much better and I do wonder if the plants adapt to local conditions over a few generations so I'd suggest sourcing from local stock if you can.

Garlic chives is a different plant.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 34500
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Treacodactyl wrote:
I do wonder if the plants adapt to local conditions over a few generations .


Pro-evolution propaganda. BURN HIM.

Green Rosie



Joined: 13 May 2007
Posts: 10498
Location: Calvados, France
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

lettucewoman wrote:
Ginkotree wrote:
Please could some one tell me what a ransome is


it's wild garlic...the stuff that smells heavenly in the woods about this time of year long leaves and small white flowers. The leaves are yummy wilted into rice.


But it doesn't smell so nice if you have to mow paths through it on a sit on mower as I did when I worked for the NT. In fact it quickly makes you feel like throwing up

Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

otatop wrote:
Are they what I grow in my garden and know as garlic chives? (Leaves broader than ordinary chives, and with white flowers)

I don't think so, what I've got has really broad leaves. Like nettie I am confused over it's name, that's why I added 'wild garlic' in brackets. Allium ursinum, for the really technical minded gardeners amongst us.
Garlic chives are Allium tuberosum, and ordinary chives are Allium schoenoprasum.

While we are on the subject of wild garlic, does anyone know why it's not generally cultivated even by 'gyo'ers?

nettie



Joined: 02 Dec 2004
Posts: 5888
Location: Suffolk
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Woodburner wrote:
otatop wrote:
Are they what I grow in my garden and know as garlic chives? (Leaves broader than ordinary chives, and with white flowers)

I don't think so, what I've got has really broad leaves. Like nettie I am confused over it's name, that's why I added 'wild garlic' in brackets. Allium ursinum, for the really technical minded gardeners amongst us.
Garlic chives are Allium tuberosum, and ordinary chives are Allium schoenoprasum.

While we are on the subject of wild garlic, does anyone know why it's not generally cultivated even by 'gyo'ers?


I reckon it's cos you need rather damp shade to grow them successfully, they seem to be abundant by streams in woodland. I'd love to have them them but we are high and dry here on sandy topsoil with clay underneath. Luckily there are ancient woodlands in walking distance, with a stream running through .

Agree about the garlic chives, I have them too, and they're not the same thing.

Last edited by nettie on Mon Apr 20, 09 7:17 pm; edited 1 time in total

KILLITnGRILLIT



Joined: 14 Sep 2006
Posts: 894
Location: Looking at a screen in the front room
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 09 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Woodburner wrote:
......does anyone know why it's not generally cultivated even by 'gyo'ers?


.....because it grows wild 200m from my door, about 3-4 acres of it and it needs lifting and dividing as it has rust spots.......... any takers ??









.

SarahB



Joined: 09 Sep 2007
Posts: 869
Location: South Wales
PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 09 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Nick wrote:
Treacodactyl wrote:
I do wonder if the plants adapt to local conditions over a few generations .


Pro-evolution propaganda. BURN HIM.


Oooh, BBQ! I'll get some mallows for toasting....

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