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gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1446
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 17 1:53 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Life is like that, Cassandra, make an appointment and arrive late, they must have got this 'being late' from the saying that "if they ask you to dinner at 7.30 for 8, then you must not get there till 7.50". This is not my theory; I like to be wherever I am going on time and am prepared to be early and wait round the corner, good manners is never to be late. The British workman is just the same, and usually with traffic as an excuse! Perhaps they chose the scenic route!
The resultant product looks good on the floor, and you liking it is the main thing.

I have a feeling that the fishing will come back to Scotland once Brexit is in place; hopefully giving some to export to 'them' over the channel, may even get a new cod war! Pennan was a tiny village with nothing to commend it except it was peaceful and beautiful with a natural harbour if I recall, nearly 40 years ago since I was there. Lovely little cottages on the horseshoe surround of the harbour and allotments on the side of the hill above the village. I could retire there....do very little....and enjoy it! The descent was so steep into the village that the window in our bedroom was at road level, but only the length of the pub bar! on the ground floor!

Glad you have the charcoal situation well in hand now and that it has been in good demand, MR. The best-anti horsefly is smoke I understand, I prefer to kill them myself you are sure that way.

Not a lot happening down this way, apart from silage and haymaking, there are plenty doing the second cut already, in spite of a late start, things have speeded up a bit weather wise. We have threatened thunder storms, I just hope they keep off till harvests are in store.

It appears that I got the greeting wrong Jam Lady, it should be Happy Independance Day, and not Thanksgiving for which I apologise. I often open my mouth and change feet!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 17 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Glad the vinyl is down anyway Cassandra. Annoying for you about the History Room though.

It sounds as if it is rather cold with you. We have the opposite problem as it is rather too warm with us. Mid 20s C, which is a bit warm for physical work.

You confused me a bit too Gregotyn. I originally put in Thanksgiving the same as you did, but then thought; that's not until November.

I am not sure that we will get much fishing back. The fish just aren't there, and I can't see enough patrol boats being available to stop anyone fishing 'our' waters, even if an agreement is reached about them. Having a 60 mile limit is fine if you have 120 miles between the two countries (which we don't round the English Channel) and if you can enforce it.

We did another firing of the big and little kilns yesterday again. Husband and son went off to deliver a double load of firewood while I watched them. I also managed to make another spoon and got a fair way into making a scoop. I have to sort out the depth before I can finish it though.

Saw a leveret wandering round the yard yesterday evening. It came within a few feet of me and didn't seem the least bit bothered. Saw an adult on the way out; lovely long ears and loping gait.

cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1531

PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 17 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I'm very fond of hares (so is Seb), and love seeing them loafing about on the oval. I even saw some just the other day which was quite out of season! As you say it is rather chilly here, so chilly that the lino, that has been rolled for almost a year at least, is still a bit hilly, so skirting boards will have to wait till it settles to horizontal. I will add a heater to the room tomorrow as I will be at home. Meanwhile I can still do architraves around doors and windows and the skirting will come after the lino has settled down.

There is a distinct icy blast wandering in from near the window as I type. Fortunately it is also still, so no driving draughts. And having been out all day the heater has not had a real chance to do its job.

Between visitors I closed up for half and hour and took the dishwasher and various offcuts to the tip, then raced back so at least that is one job I won't have to do tomorrow. Though I will probably end up doing at least one more tip trip as I will be doing a bit of throwing out tomorrow too.

I am 70 rows short of finishing the vest, though after that I have to work the edging for the neck and arm holes (once I have cut the steeks that will create difficulties as getting the sewing machine out right now will be a nightmare.

So trimming doors and fitting architraves in a heated room tomorrow - that should be fun

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1446
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 17 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes a hare fan here also; it is the lolloping gait that I like, but so few round here, mostly rabbits. We also get a lot of moles; it would only take a couple of years to get a waistcoat!

We have overcast now with a gentle breeze, so warm without squinting into the sun. My doom and gloom prediction-it will probably rain or get dark before 12pm tonight!, sorry!

I will be packing more tomorrow with a view to going in a couple of weeks-I will miss being under the barn, in a 24 ft. of caravan, mainly the morning sun and the view.

I think there will be fishing after the exit, as there won't be so many of those big hoover type vessels in British waters. But as you say, MR, it depends on the patrol vessels available-read money!
Do you think those Jam Lady baskets are made from freshly felled ash MR? I have a few to fell soon, 1 or 2 largish. would it be better to wait to work them or get them cut into slithers early whilst green, hoping to avoid splits and so on. And would it be best to use quartered timber for them too. I realise the ash handles would want to be seasoned, but for manipulation round corners I would have thought that fresh was best, cut into lathes and kept moist, I don't know, help needed please.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1720
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 17 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Young rabbit who sits outside the kitchen, entertaining the cats and eating grass, clover, and weeds. He nips the stem close to the ground, then daintily snarfles it up.



And Rowanlady, Gregotyn - something for you two: A-Tisket, A-Tasket, Looking At Some Baskets

.

cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1531

PostPosted: Sat Jul 08, 17 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I love watching a rabbit eat - long bits of food progressively disappearing into relentless jaws!

My day was mostly about sorting out what could go back against walls rather than cutting architraves. It was blooming chilly again, and while the heater did raise the temperature a little in the kitchen, I am afraid I turned it off as I hated having it on.

So the oven has gone back to its original position, but the dishwasher is still in its packaging as I will have to install the relevant bit of skirting before it goes back and that will require the lino to settle down a bit more.

Likewise the washing machine remains out of action too as I want to install skirting against the wall it sits beside before hooking it up again. Since I will be in the History Room again tomorrow that will not be soon.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Sat Jul 08, 17 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sounds as if you have a lot to do with your kitchen Cassandra, but at least you have the flooring more or less installed. Should be good when it is finished.

Gregotyn, I have never prepared ash for baskets, but as I understand you need to get a long narrow plank that has the grain running along it all the way, so you would need to cut vertically down through the log and discard the middle bit. You then bash the ends until the grain separates, then I think you can pull it apart, but not sure about if you need more bashing. There is bound to be a clip about it on the internet somewhere. Try looking under preparing ash for baskets.

We don't get many rabbits. Think disease and predators got most of them, but we do seem to do well for hares, which are supposed to be quite rare.

Husband and son managed quite a bit of firewood yesterday. On the way back from Food Bank I stopped off at the Downs where the Parish Council have a bioblitz. They are looking for all the wildlife they can find over a 24 hour period. They had moth trapping and a bat walk yesterday evening, and I did some flora surveying for them. Only spent an hour or so, but got quite a good haul, although nothing particularly unusual. Sadly the Downs are being spoilt by dog walking and lack of grazing, but people don't like cattle where they are walking their dogs, and the cattle aren't too keen on some dogs either. It is owned by either the parish or county council, so is a public open space.

We didn't have any rain btw, so I had to water the vegetables.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Sat Jul 08, 17 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Sorry, double post.

Last edited by Mistress Rose on Sat Jul 08, 17 7:45 am; edited 1 time in total

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1446
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat Jul 08, 17 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thank you Jam Lady for the link to the baskets, interesting. I had a look at the ash preparation for baskets but there was too much noise and I had no ear plugs to stop the noise from the video going into the library and disturbing the other folks in there.
Thankyou MR for the gen on the ash prep., I got a fair bit from watching a video, but would have liked the commentary too. I will have a go and also get a set of head speakers to be able to listen. I think it is safe to say it is probably a green wood job rather than a well seasoned dry timber job but the chaps cutting the wood from the trees were doing it in the cold-snow on the ground! There are several clips to look at I discovered yesterday, but not enough time to absorb the gen. I have the librarian looking for a suitable book of instructions, because they are good like that here-and the fact I supply them with free starter firewood helps!

Dog walking and cattle don't mix too well, folks get maimed and even killed by cattle in the event of the 2 sets mixing, especially cows with calves at foot. Some dogs will work cattle and sheep, but they tend to be fleet of foot to get out of the way! And then if you graze sheep on open ground legitimately, the situation is that some dogs will chase sheep and kill them. My friend has shot a few that he has caught in the act of chasing sheep.

I have been into work today to collect 2 large pallets-12ft long by 5ft wide. I was going to borrow the company pickup, but the boss had to use it so that fell through, but I did some work for the 2 chaps who came in to open up at 8 o'clock. The timbers of the pallet are large cross section and suitable for another large shed frame. Be a lot cheaper than the all metal one I have just bought-which is not enough. No rain for us either, but was expected.

Hope you get your kitchen sorted soon, Cassandra, but important to get it right, both for the eye and efficiency.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 17 5:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yes, I think the ash is worked green Gregotyn, so I am afraid your well stored ash is more suitable for something else. Your librarians sound lovely; ours are pretty good too, but I don't use the computer there, so don't know how much help I would get with that.

I think they fence the cattle in to various parts of the Downs so the dog walkers have to stay out of them. Of course that causes problems as they insist they have the right to walk their dogs where they like. I noticed though that when I was up there the other day there were paths, probably mowed, in certain places, so that tends to keep people on the right route and off the more delicate bits and the best flowers.

Had a good afternoon in the garden yesterday. Husband cut the lawn, which hadn't been cut for a good few weeks. We had one pyramid orchid, so that area has been left. I worked at building a compost heap with alternate layers of wood chip from cutting the buddleia and grass cuttings, which gave us a good hot heap and lots of good compost last year. He went up to the woods for a little while and I did some more work on a coffee scoop I am making with a feather shaped handle. Have now got the bowl about 1 tablespoon and the handle about the right thickness. Main work now is to make some detail on the feather, so need my knife for fine carving next, then the others again to make some further shaping. Will see how I get on.

cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1531

PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 17 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I am so with you on that Gregotyn. I would rather not rush the job as I am a firm believer in doing a job once and well, and as this will be the second iteration of the kitchen, I want to be sure to get it right. One job that will be easier while the cabinets are missing is installing the window sill, so I am off to the Men's Shed tomorrow to cut a long piece of timber in halves down the middle for that purpose. I will probably cut it to length before I go though. It has moulded sides and ends, so will make a nice sill, and the cut end can easily be formed with a rasp as it is soft timber. Basically a D-profile for those who wonder about this sort of thing.

Since it will be plus one degree tomorrow I hope I will be able to manage an early start, but the animals show no interest to getting up lately, and if it is a foggy morning I may well sleep in!

Speaking of the animals, I got home and found Smidgen and Billy curled up together on the sofa - a real breakthrough! Though when Smidgen spotted me, he looked terribly self-conscious and got down rapidly, lol. Since things settled down post Billly's arrival the two cats have maintained an armed peace, tolerating each other at the food bowl but not when relaxing, so this is real progress!

Another day in the History Room and unexpected visit from a good friend and her daughter - albeit brief as they were en route from one end of the island to the other and planning on flying out to South Australia in the morning. But good to see them. It seems her mother is failing badly, so it will not be long before we all head up to Ulverstone for the funeral I suspect. Mind you, said mother is pushing 100 so not surprising really.

More knitting done - about 60 rows to go to finish the vest body, then arm holes and neck to bind and I have a new garment - just in time for Summer I suspect, lol

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 17 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hope you get the window sill done Cassandra. Sounds as if it will be ideal. Good that the cats are getting on better now, even if they don't really want you to know. Your vest should be ideal whatever time of year I would think. From what you say of your summer, it might be suitable for the cooler days.

We did our Charity walk in London yesterday; about 6 miles including some of the bridges. We caught the 8am train from our local station to allow ourselves plenty of time to get there, which was just as well, as we had the usual problems getting to the start. This year it was the Jubilee Line was stopped because sadly there was a body on the line. We had a choice of walking or going by river. Two of our team went on on foot to register us, and the rest went by boat and just got there in time, which I thought we wouldn't. Apart from a lift not working on one bridge, which was a difficult one for DIL to climb because of the shape of the steps, we managed pretty well.

London is looking pretty scruffy. Seems like years of austerity have had their effect there too. To all foreign visitors; please don't judge us on what our capital city looks like, the natives are the same.

cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1531

PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 17 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Haha sorry to hear London has gone downhill - so many things wrong with austerity budgetting it is hard to know where to start.

I did get the sill cut, and it is presently lying on the kitchen floor with a view to creating a levelling incentive for the humps and hollows in the lino.

Then I got home and started to install the dishwasher. First I had to install some skirting which was fairly straight forward once I found fixings of the right length. Plugged it in, attached all relevant hoses and tried to turn it on. Nothing.

Read the manual and certain lights were supposed to come on if I pushed certain buttons. They didn't. Turned the dial that selects the washing cycle - occasional flickers of light. Finally got one particular cycle to retain its light and pushed the button to select a half wash. Nothing. Pushed the button for a full wash and voila! Then it made humming noises for some time then switched itself off.

So I rang the suppliers and suggested they might like to do something about this, and went back to fiddling with nobs and dials and worked out I had turned the tap off instead of on, and so it started. Then, when it failed to drain, I discovered that the wee nipple thingy on the side of the u-trap has to be drilled out before it works (often wondered why water did not gush out when I was emptying the sink). So I will have to unscrew the hose clamp and detach the hose and drill that out (easier said than done as it has one of those silly star-head screws on the clamp and I have to find the relevant bit to do that again which is not going to happen for the next two days as I presently have too much Irish Stew in my tummy and tomorrow I will be back in the History Room again. Still at least I will have the mechanical problems sorted before the guy arrives to sort out the electronic ones which will help save face a bit! haha

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 17 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Never trust electronics; it's out to get you. I used to work with it, and as I always saw it in the development stage, it always amazes me when it works, rather than the other way round. My instant diagnosis is always dry solder joints, especially if it is an 'intermittent fault', and I am usually right.

Yesterday morning went round the woods with a woman who is going to do a bat survey in a week or so's time. She was looking for somewhere to put our mist nets as the bats she is looking for are difficult to find with the normal echo locators. As we are starting at dusk, it shouldn't be a problem with people around. Trouble is we finish rather late, but luckily nothing in particular to do the next day.

We are expecting rain some time today for the first time in several weeks, but not sure when, so charcoal bagging may have to wait until tomorrow. Husband and son got the charcoal out of the kiln yesterday anyway.

I had a tea party given by the leader of the food bank for the helpers. Lovely tea, but I ate too much and all the wrong things. She sent me home with two huge slabs of cake too, so plenty for the rest of the family.

cassandra



Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 1531

PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 17 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

After much bodily contortion and increasingly unhelpful suggestions from various people on FB I have removed the u-trap, rinsed it out, drilled a hole in the spigot, sanded the edges of the drilled hole, reconnected it and am presently waiting for the cycle to end so I can work out if my initial problems with the electronics were a result of impatience on my part, or fault on the machine's part. Meanwhile the shop helpfully called and suggested I might like to bring it back for a replacement. I pointed out that a) I had paid for the service that has them removing it and b) I was still working my way through a trouble-shooting process and would call them tomorrow if I wanted them to replace it. So it's all good at present as either way I have a solution.

Today was rather busy in the History Room with 8 customers to entertain, nevertheless I made considerably more progress on the vest and am down to the final strait in terms of knitting (and wool, I have to say). So it will be yarn chicken for the next 40 or so rows and I will see how I go. If all else fails I will just have to spin a bit more, so no drama.

The Irish Stew was delicious and will make dinner for the next three nights which is good - and with any luck I will have a dishwasher with a pot-scrubber function to deal with the casserole dish.

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