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DorsetScott



Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 496
Location: Bournemouth
PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 13 10:41 am    Post subject: Beefsteak  Reply with quote    

Excuse the not so mushroomy picture, but went on a quick forage during lunch break and found first (and second) ever Beefsteak Fungus.
Seems lots of contradicting info on whether they're nice or not, and a lot of people saying to soak them before use, so I'm experimenting, 1 in milk, the other in water. There's another couple growing so I'll get one in a couple of days and try unsoaked ala Roger Phillips stlye.


jp



Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 297
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 13 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have seen seen several of these this year (great year for fungi) but subscribe to John Wright's book on mushrooms, which says under Beefsteak fungi:

"I am reminded of the good Dr Johnson's advice on the preparation of cucumber:'A cucumber should be well sliced, and dressed with pepper and vinegar, and then thrown out as good for nothing'.

John goes on so say that the same probably applies to Beefsteak fungi! I have tried them once or twice & not been impressed. However, please don't let that stop you - taste is a personal thing (I happen to like cucumber). Let us know what you think of them

fungi2bwith



Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 167
Location: NE Hants
PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 13 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They can have a slightly unpleasant metallic taste which can be reduced by soaking in milk. But even after this they are OK but not great when cooked. They can be good if used as follows:
1. Very young just emerging beefsteaks fried in butter are very tasty without significant metallic taste.
2. Eaten raw thinly sliced in a salad provided not too old.
3. Warmed through in olive oil (warm but effectively raw)

DorsetScott



Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 496
Location: Bournemouth
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 13 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've been on a few forays with John through Kingcoombe and also a couple with my work, and he said exactly the same thing. But then Roger Phillips wild food cooks them without any pre soaking and adds "This is a really 5 star dish; definitely on of my favourite mushroom recipes."
Guess it's a case of each to their own, but tonight should be the night I make my mind up, at least on the method with soaking it.

jp



Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 297
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 13 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Let us know what you think! I've been on one of John's forays at Kingcombe too - really enjoyed it.

DorsetScott



Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 496
Location: Bournemouth
PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 13 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

IMHO John lived up to his name, he was (w)right.
Soaked in milk, didn't like it.
Soaked in water, didn't like it.

I'm still gonna give it one more go cooked like Roger Phillips suggests, and when I harvest that one I'm going to try it raw too, but it looks like Beefsteak Fungus and myself will have a very short relationship when it comes to eating.

Oh well.

Duane Dibbley



Joined: 12 Nov 2009
Posts: 95
Location: Between Newbury and Andover
PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 13 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Always raw for me....sliced thinly in salads or just drizzled with warm olive oil

DorsetScott



Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 496
Location: Bournemouth
PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 13 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Duane Dibbley wrote:
Always raw for me....sliced thinly in salads or just drizzled with warm olive oil


Well it can't be any worse than fried and on toast

Marlow.Manners



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 13 10:30 am    Post subject: Re Beefsteak Reply with quote    

I find the best way to cook beefsteaks when I find them, is to add them sliced to either Italian hunter's casserole (chicken cacciatori), coq au vin, or with steak and kidney, as the flavour improves with long, slow cooking or brazing in wine and stock. Quickly sauteeing doesn't remove the tannin flavour they absorb from their host tree, hence people are often disappointed or put off.

DorsetScott



Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 496
Location: Bournemouth
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 13 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Cheers for the tip Marlow, that leaves me 3 ways to try now (counting long slow cooking as 1)

in the hills



Joined: 19 Sep 2013
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 13 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Went on a foraging course recently. Beefsteak was collected and prepared for us to taste. Course leader said that it needed soaking for several hours before cooking (10 I think) and several water changes in that time. This was to remove the tannins.

Enjoyed it, as did everyone on the course, including a chef!!!

DorsetScott



Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 496
Location: Bournemouth
PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 13 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

in the hills wrote:
Went on a foraging course recently. Beefsteak was collected and prepared for us to taste. Course leader said that it needed soaking for several hours before cooking (10 I think) and several water changes in that time. This was to remove the tannins.

Enjoyed it, as did everyone on the course, including a chef!!!


I did soak it for about 24 hours, but I didn't change the water. Maybe that would have helped.
Went and checked the spot I saw a young one and it looks like it fell/got knocked/broken by youths off the tree, so looks like I may not get to put beefsteak in the "mushrooms I like" pile just yet.

Marlow.Manners



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 13 8:48 am    Post subject: Re Beefsteak Reply with quote    

Make a note of the oak tree's location in your diary/phone calender; visit it next Aug/Sept, as beefsteaks grow on the same tree each year - also check any neighbouring oaks, as it's worth following a recommended preparation in case you're pleasantly surprised. Don't give up yet!

MM

DorsetScott



Joined: 23 Oct 2011
Posts: 496
Location: Bournemouth
PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 13 9:57 am    Post subject: Re: Re Beefsteak Reply with quote    

Marlow.Manners wrote:
also check any neighbouring oaks


I've checked every single surrounding oak. There's a fair few around, but not a single beefsteak. Oh well, only 10 months to wait

Marlow.Manners



Joined: 20 Oct 2013
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 13 12:40 pm    Post subject: Re Beefsteaks Reply with quote    

It may be the end of the beefsteak season, but we're now entering Blewitt season (worth keeping a look out!)

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