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Which kitchen food mixer?
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oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 14 5:08 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

kGarden wrote:
......That's an A700 model (I now know) from the 1950's, didn't see any of those on eBay at the moment,.....which looks a bit of an uninteresting shape to me


We modernists think that the second image (A701?) is the best looking of the lot:
Quote:
The Bauhaus firmly establish industrial design. It stripped away the decoration, and left clean lines of function....... To the teachers and followers of the involved in the Bauhaus, function was the primary concern,
Ref

kGarden



Joined: 01 Dec 2014
Posts: 178
Location: Suffolk, UK
PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 14 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

oldish chris wrote:

We modernists think that the second image (A701?) is the best looking of the lot


I'm rubbish at "what looks good" in all sorts of areas - except perhaps the garden. Simple demarcation on choices with Mrs K responsible for interior décor and me for the garden so I'm not surprised that the A701 is considered superior design.

I was brought up with the A700 and that may have been formative.

Having said that it weighed a ton, and the A701 looks lighter, and Forum chatter I read (including a 10 page theead on Money Saving Expert discussing the minutia!) favours the A701 as being bomb-proof.

I've ordered the Andrew James as being cheap & cheerful for now, and I'll take an executive decision on a replacement if it gets used a lot. Not sure about life-expectancy giving a Food Mixer as a Crimbles pressie two years running Meantime I have some searches running on eBay and might make an impulse purchase during the year if something suitable comes up.

I can also see myself persuading myself that £200 would be well spent on restoring one to "better than new condition"
http://kenwoodchefrestore.co.uk/Restorations.htm

Mrs K is quite happy with practical gifts (before you ask ). I remember hearing on the radio, some years ago in the run up to Christmas, advice to men from a (female) Pundit - "Nothing for the kitchen, and nothing you saw on late night TV" At that point I had already bought a kitchen table in readiness for XMas ... not to worry, Mrs K loved it. Years ago I bought her something that probably WOULD have been seen on Late Night TV ... not going to try that again though!!

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 14 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

kGarden wrote:
I've ordered the Andrew James as being cheap & cheerful for now, and I'll take an executive decision on a replacement if it gets used a lot.
That's probably a wise decision. At a guess, it won't be used that much, not like you are going to become a professional baker (are you?). In which case it will probably give years of service. If you do actually wear it out, then something nearer to professional kit would be an investment.

Duane Dibbley



Joined: 12 Nov 2009
Posts: 95
Location: Between Newbury and Andover
PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 14 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I have just sold a A701A on Ebay for a bargain £26

Chez



Joined: 13 Aug 2006
Posts: 35904
Location: The Hive of the Uberbee, Quantock Hills, Somerset
PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 14 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We've got an A 701 with various attachments that we use for everything but liquidising; and a Vitamix blender. Love them both. The Kenwood cost me about £30, is easy to fieldstrip and the parts are readily available.

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 14 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

My Kenwood (A701) has rarely been used for several years. With only the two of us at home, the amount of pastry that I make, I just do it by hand so there's very little washing up.

However, youngest son who is a bit of a cook (signature dish: Beef bourguignon) says he'll get it restored and give it a good home - reckons that that particular model will give him great credibility with other cooks.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 44270
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 18 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
I think I'd buy a twenty year old kenwood. They'll do another century and parts are available.


Just replaced the motor in our 20+ year old chef, loads and loads of usage over the years. Remarkable how much of the stuff we bought for our first house is still in regular use.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 35406
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 18 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

29 yr old kitchenaid still fine. it gets a new rubber drive cog every few years bit everything else seems solid or mobile as intended.

we have gone through a few cheap stick blenders, waste of money, the last one survived about 10 ltrs of veg soup before the plastic drive gave out , the use of super glue got it as far as 4th use but "there was nothing more we could do for it" after the drive melted on pan 4


( shhhhh santa knows where an industrial one might be delivered )

2yr trade use gnt so i hope it might last a few years of domestic toil for the soup dragon.

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