Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
ceps awol ? not any more
Page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Foraging
Author 
 Message
jp



Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 297
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 17 3:32 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Nowt, nader, zilch, nuttin' - ceps seem to be awol where I am. Hoping that they are just running late, but fear the wet summer has scuppered them. Time will tell...

Quote:
are now sliced and dried, a couple of days reaching full flavour in a no longer on dehydrator and they will be ready for the jar
interested why you leave the dried ceps in the dehydrator before storing dpack - how does it improve the flavour?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32958
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 17 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

more oxidation to enhance the umami flavour

dry, rest, quick dry again and then store seems to work well.

this reminded me to empty dehydrator and check both trees asap

jp



Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 297
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 17 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Interesting - I must try that. Generally I just dry them (when there's any to find - grrrrr) in the dehydrator and then straight into the storage jar. I guess I'm concerned lest they absorb moisture after drying & then spoil. I even put some rice in the storage containers to absorb any residual moisture.
By the way, which part of the world are you in dpack (I won't be offended if you don't want to say) - I'm hoping your ceps are running ahead of my patches because you are far away! Eternal optimist, me

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32958
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 17 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

york uk so i would expect your ones to have shown first but rainfall etc etc and the local microclimate of a given spot is probably more of a factor than latitude

here is dry compared to the uk average but that might be a plus for ceps as i have never found them in really damp locations like the west coast or even the west slopes/tops pennines

the super experienced polish lady that first taught me a bit about edible shrooms reckoned that whenever autumn starts is the start of the ceps season, so i spose once the birch leaves begin to lose the green and go yellow is a good marker.

that would fit with slim's not too warm and fairly damp time scale at least in the uk.

my next marker is soil temp under 10 degrees c for the field blewits followed by first frosts for the best pleurotus spp. and hard frosts for the velvet shanks:wink:

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8820

PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 17 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Don't think it has been a good year for ceps with us either jp and we are in the south. Has been rather damp generally for about the last month. Not always raining, but generally damp.

jp



Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 297
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 17 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Still hoping that October might redeem the Cep harvest, but I guess that will be weather dependent here in the south.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32958
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 17 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

got a couple of big uns today and about ten button ones, no point in leaving the buttons as im busy for a few days and chances are they would be too old to be much use.

i already have a few old uns mixed with soil for inoculating new sites

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8820

PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 17 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hope you have left enough on the original site to get more next year Dpack. Don't know much about ceps life cycle, but may need some spores from this years crop to keep going.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32958
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 17 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i always leave some and some just leave themselves by getting too mushy to eat

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8820

PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 17 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

True. For some reason slugs and snails seem to like fungi too. I sometimes go back to get a full ID and find something has eaten it, even the poisonous ones.

jp



Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 297
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 17 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It seems to be a funny old season - I can't figure out if it's running early, or late, or just not really happening. I found a load of lovely chanterelles yesterday which is much later than I would normally expect to see them. I also found plenty of hedgehog shrooms which are about on time around here. But still no ceps - I'm beginning to wonder if they turned up back in July when we had a load of cool damp weather......

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32958
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 17 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

my outdoor tomatoes are only just starting to ripen but the blackberries were a month or more early so you might be right about a rather odd year for seasons.

quite a few of the ornamental things in homestead park seem to out of season as well.

jp



Joined: 09 Nov 2006
Posts: 297
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 17 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Interesting - straws in the wind pointing to an odd season. I'm going to continue to keep an eye on my shroom spots over the next few weeks to see if anything changes.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3118
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 17 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As for the oddness of the season, I expect to see the occasional fruit bearer throwing the odd flower out of season - apples seem to do it more than most, as I recall. But this year a lot of brambles have a few flowers on them, and today, at the edge of a big clump of dry Hemlock (Conium maculatum) stems was one plant with beautiful green vegetation and splendid white flowers.

Henry

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32958
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 17 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

meadow sweet is in full flower for the second time and there seems to be a good crop of red clover flowers for mid october in york

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Foraging All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com

<-- -->