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sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6323
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 18 1:56 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Thanks GZ. I will do. Why do I need to do that?

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6461
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 18 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

to stop weed seeds germinating or landing, to feed the soil(mulch) and also carbon release to the atmosphere caused by digging...read upon permaculture?

Nature will fill any gap/bare soil you leave with things you don't want!!

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6323
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 18 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thank you for that GZ I'll have a read up on permaculture.

Would I be too late to sow some green manure?

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6461
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 18 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think so, I'm trying to think who is best able to help...I don't think Ferme de Sourrou are on ds so much now...but Irene is on FB and the Ferme has a page as well. Is there an article on here about green manure?

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34894
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 18 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sgt.colon wrote:
Thank you for that GZ I'll have a read up on permaculture.

Would I be too late to sow some green manure?


no, if you pick a lowish temp late autumn option it will be ahead of the "weeds " in the spring.

or use the time and space to get an early crop of broad beans under plastic.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 6461
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 18 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

good point dpack...add garlic to that!

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6323
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 18 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thank you both.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 34894
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 18 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

if you do go the cloche route 1000gm clear plastic and plastic water/gas pipe, some pegs and paracord is quick and surprising robust. hold the edges down with bricks for easy skirt lifting.

winter salads and a place to start things early is rather nice as well

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5366
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 18 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Plenty of cold hardy winter options. Some would do better as transplants put in the ground prior to winter....

spinach, arugula, cilantro, lettuce, kale,

If planted late summer: carrots, beets

etc....

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10401

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 18 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just be aware that water pipe can bend under a snow load and not move back. Our log store is constructed like that and has a frame of scaffold poles to prevent it bending. That is a lot bigger than a cloche though. I overwinter purple sprouting broccoli and winter cabbage, but I find the kale, although it survives and comes on again in the spring, gives up in the frost. I have tried both curly and black, but neither seem to be frost hardy.

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4161
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 18 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Try the Thousand Headed variety,quite hardy to frost.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10401

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 18 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Thanks Ty, I might do that next year. Frost doesn't actually kill the other varieties, but knocks them back so no harvest during frost.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5366
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 18 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
Thanks Ty, I might do that next year. Frost doesn't actually kill the other varieties, but knocks them back so no harvest during frost.


What do you mean by this?
Over here Kale can't survive the full winter un-protected, but we can essentially "bank" kale for the winter to be harvested as needed, and allowed to thaw in the fridge.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 10401

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 18 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We don't have such severe winters as you Slim. We don't get snow every year, and some years we don't have frost for more than a few days at a time. My kale goes floppy if it is very cold, but starts growing again as soon as it warms up in the spring. I keep it going until the flowering shoots can't be kept under control, but eat those while in bud as well as a sort of rough broccoli.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5366
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 18 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Have you tried harvesting them during frost anyway? That wouldn't stop me!

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