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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i think i got a planned, sort of, ladybird larvae snap, i got a half nice observational one of mr brack and little bracket yesterday

back soon on those

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



they are working hard at shopping, more little brackets seems likely

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mistress Rose wrote:
No, he isn't a climber and our trees aren't exactly easy as they are plantation and so fairly long and thin, even with judicious thinning over the years.

Yesterday was a butterfly day as very hot. Sadly they were very active, so it was a question of 'is it a ...' as it zoomed past. Think I may have seen a white admiral, and saw a lot of silver washed fritillaries, some newly hatched by the look of it, red admirals, gatekeepers/meadow browns (couldn't tell at a distance) and assorted whites.

not a climber is the issue with that idea, even pencil ash can be climbed not sensible or easy but it can be done

bait em to floor level

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3703
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Bait them seems possible, but I think you need a bit of open ground to allow them to feel secure.

Henry

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6791
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Do you get such shots with a remote for your camera DPack, or are you actually there, up close and personal? Great shot as well.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

sgt.colon wrote:
Do you get such shots with a remote for your camera DPack, or are you actually there, up close and personal? Great shot as well.


up close and personal for that one, about 5 ft maybe, they trust me(i work for them as chef and waiter etc)

i use a button on a wire (or the wireless one) for some stuff, if it is on a tripod tis often better to look at the beasts rather than crouch and peer at where they will be very soon

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

these are better than the last lockdown bird snaps

this chap has started to get what is required, the chick on the lens of the 7 is ace

i spose sport and wildlife have similar challenges, movement, lighting framing etc

well done that man, i will try to learn from those, some are super, some less so, why matters

sgt.colon



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 6791
Location: Just south of north.
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Some fantastic shots there and yes, the chick on the lens if brilliant.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    



a low fat version, not just press one filter button it took a bit of work to get to a one button look

full fat is rather jolly

the reason i like it is not the look, although that seems ok, but that i realized how the leap is vital to getting airspeed by the first flap

not quite a vertical take off, more like a catapult launch from a carrier deck or BASE jumping in a wing suit

tidy technique for getting airborne young bracket

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Mistress Rose wrote:
Afraid I wasn't impressed by most of them. Yours are far better Dpack. Son tries to get pictures in the woods, and he has achieved one or two quite nice ones of perched birds. The buzzards keep teasing him by calling when they are above the canopy and he can't get a decent shot of them. He is sure they do it on purpose.

For the Sammisons, could you put some food out in a well lit spot and focus on it for shots when they come out to feed? That seems to be the way most people get shots of mice.


it is quite dark when they are most active, mikki was out in daylight this evening but it would have been too dark for decent snaps

i will look into the IR thing, a visible light would be easy for me and horrid for them

if that is not an option i will try something very gentle but they are well quick and probably need at least a 2000th shutter speed
they are tiny as well so the 100/400 lens seems ideal which means more light
see quick i need a decent depth of field

an afternoon pap in winter at the limits of the tech got a few snaps but nowt of quality

meeces are tricky models to work with, especially as it would be nice to do justice to their fine pelts

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 20 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

ps dawn is another poss for available light snaps of the mice, they are pretty active for half an hour after first light

i recon it needs tech but i do not know what tech yet

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 12080

PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 20 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Those photos are a lot better; as you say, some of them very good. The one of the bird on the lens isn't the best picture in the world, but it makes everyone smile I think. The other plus is, seeing those pictures, I am pretty sure that we must have had a long tailed tit nesting in our garden. I thought they only passed through.

Yesterday we had a silver washed fritillary butterfly take up residence near our seats in the wood. It perched a few times, so was able to see the detail on both top and underwing. A very beautiful butterfly.

The down side was it was very hot.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 5745
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 20 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I saw what I think to be a mantis fly the other day. First glance told my brain wasp, second glance said hover fly, closer look found the one mantis looking foreleg - apparently it lost one somewhere along the way.
First one I've ever seen

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 20 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Sifu Mantis is a good teacher

ace critters if a bit scarey, they have quite a nip on em, very yin/yang in hunting style, a twig does nothing and by the time you noticed that you are being eaten

the awesome accelerations they can do are educational, well up there with flea jumps etc

mantis is a very valid internal animal style, it suits skinny folk like me

good spotting, it does seem a bit far north but 5 legs on my wagon etc

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 38186
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 20 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

rather than snapping i have been watching take offs

the blackbirds choose a good pad, then do a double stage drop to crouch and then jump using muscle power and elastic tension and the leverage that relatively long legs and feet provide

iirc i have slomo of some sort on the camera if it is in video mode , i might be able to extract the images of the stages of the leap

it is quite impressive as a means to deal with vtol/stol issues
the yard is a fairly tight space to fly in

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