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Government legislation on burning 'wet' wood
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Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4421
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 20 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I was shocked to see it posted on the Mining Forum last night as not seen any mention of the consultation anywhere before,when was this taking place.?
Its a headache for you,to store a year`s worth of timber to season takes a lot of space,and not everyone can take the larger loads to season themselves.
The only way I know of to cut down on moisture in timber is to fell in the winter months when the sap is down,as we used to years back when dropping an oak tree for fencing posts.
Well I`m glad the FOD boy`s have obtained an exemption,all the sizes of coal are sold locally in a non smokeless zone.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40346
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 20 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

413.40ppm

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8443
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 20 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

So far this only affects England.

Scotland & Wales have not taken this up yet.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40346
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 20 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

that experiment was interesting

at the mo the house is warm
2kg of hardwood lump charcoal in a late victorian parlour grate works very well.

maybe it burns a bit hot, i could spray it like forge coals but it works a treat.

that avoids the smokeless/wet wood issues big style.

i have no idea if it is economically viable or what the by-product load might be but at point of use tis practical.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 13001

PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 20 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Ty Gwyn, it came out in 2018. I don't know if it was publicised in the mining press, but we saw it and responded to it. Only house coal is affected; no other grades at the moment, so higher quality coal is allowed. At present this is only going to affect England, as this type of legislation is devolved to Scotland, Wales, and I think Northern Ireland. I can't see it making a lot of difference to the PM2.5 levels quite honestly, and none at all to the other pollutants.

Dpack, go careful with charcoal. It can burn pretty hot, so may damage your grate or fire. A Victorian grate should be all right, but I would also have a CO monitor in the room just in case.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 40346
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 20 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

i was careful and knocked it down, same as i do when i make charcoal in a woodburner for a flying start for breakfast.

the grate has a refractory hearth and back, the sort with a metal grate might be at risk, i melted one of those with anthracite once i got it going.

i always have CO and smoke alarms, everyone should have, cheap and rather good at saving your life.

it was still going this morning but i did top it up quite late

fluffed up it would be too hot for most grates as you say

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4421
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 20 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Whether it makes much difference is hard to say,but it shows the authorities have been un capable to monitor their smokeless zones,and with the rise in popularity of multi fuel stoves in urban area`s and people burning housecoal on them for cheapness.

Regarding the boy`s in the FOD with their exemption,because of the imminent close of Aberthaw power station,their outlet for small coal/duff,they are stock piling waiting arrival of a briquette machine which will give them an outlet for the duff and an increase in revenue.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6025
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 20 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

I wouldn't know where to find coal if I wanted to here!

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 4421
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 20 1:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

What area of New England are you Slim?

Coal deposits mined years back in Newport,Rhode Island.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 6025
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 20 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
    

Northern. I can imagine you could mine much of Rhode island before losing Rhode island! (Actually it's all just too populated there to be able to do much of anything outside of suburban living)

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