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joanne

Adventure installing a woodburning stove

We've finally started on the not so simple task of installing wood burning stoves in the house - First one to tackle (mainly cos the decor is so appalling!) is the one in our dining room

You can see the original fire place behind my friend David in his beekeeping suit along with our lovely 1970's carpet and piles of clutter !



Next stage was to remove the fire and surround and knock off the plaster



Which revealed that we did infact have a supporting lintel and that the fire was actually just bricked up

So 10 bags of rubble and about 70 bricks later we have this (I've put the picture back in the same spot so you can get some perspective)



The pipes hanging down are the water pipes from the old back boiler - we are planning on putting in a stove with a back boiler to heat our water

Next stage is now - rendering the whole of the fireplace - What's the best way to do this ? Gervase ? - The house is a 1935 Brick built semi

Then obviously we need to install the baffle plate and tile or fit a hearth before installing the stove - I haven't decided what I want exactly yet
judith

Ah rubble.
It's nice to see someone else with a living room full of the stuff!
Nice big fireplace though. It will look great with a stove in there.
sean

I think that there are building regs about the nature of the hearth. Woodsprite's OH will know.
Northern_Lad

sean wrote:
I think that there are building regs about the nature of the hearth. Woodsprite's OH will know.


I think the hearth must be fireproof and extend 9" beyond the stove.
joanne

I know it has to come out 225mm beyond the front of the firebox and that the stove has to have a certain amount of space around it

50mm at the back,

You must have a gap of 150mm each side of the stove to non combustible materials and 230mm if there are combustible materials to the side,

You must have 230mm above the stove to non combustible materials and 460mm above the stove if there are combustible materials (for example wood)

We also have to have an air vent in the room if the output of the stove is more than 5KW venting to an external air source

We have had the chimney's cleaned and checked and thankfully they don't need lining
Mary-Jane

judith wrote:
Ah rubble.
It's nice to see someone else with a living room full of the stuff!


*Sigh* Aye, I know that feeling too. Neutral
Mary-Jane

Re: Adventure installing a woodburning stove

jocorless wrote:
Next stage is now - rendering the whole of the fireplace - What's the best way to do this ? Gervase ? - The house is a 1935 Brick built semi

Then obviously we need to install the baffle plate and tile or fit a hearth before installing the stove - I haven't decided what I want exactly yet


I'll get Gervase on to this when he gets home tonight Jo.
joanne

Thanks Mary-Jane - We want to get it done ASAP especially before September because until we have wood-burning stoves - the only source of heating in the house is a small gas heater in the hallway!
Treacodactyl

sean wrote:
I think that there are building regs about the nature of the hearth. Woodsprite's OH will know.


I also think that connecting a stove to an existing chimney is now covered by Part J of the building regs. I think suitably qualified installers can self certify. Worth checking.
joanne

If you install a chimney lining - that comes under the building regs and therefore has to be checked by a building inspector or be done by a qualified installer - If you don't line it - you don't come under the regs which is why we had the chimney tested to see if it needed lining as it was worth the cost compared to 750 of chimney lining plus fitting!
Will

We acid washed and sealed the brickwork, then just plastered the outer wall rather than rendering the whole lot.

We took out a repro art deco surround which had been installed in front of the original. The quantity of rubble is truly scary.
boisdevie1

Good luck with the work. The only problem is that modern houses are not really designed for the storage of wood. My friend in Lancaster has a similar problem of finding where to store his wood. But once installed they are lovely. We've got one and a second one on order for Septemer. But here firewood is readily available and not expensive.
joanne

Ahh we've plenty of space to store the wood - the joys of having a large (110ft) garden in suburbia Very Happy and intend to build a proper wood store when we do the patio's next year - we are raising them up to the level of the house and putting in the equivalent of a double garage underneath them but it will be a wood store, workshop and storage area

We also have access to a limitless supply of free well seasoned wood - our friends who also have a wood burning stove gets all the off-cuts from their friend who is a tree surgeon - they only have one stove and he regularly delivers them 12 months worth - 2 or 3 times a year!
wellington womble

Wood burners are lovely. I don't even mind lugging the wood about for ours (well, not since we moved and the woodstore isn't at the other end of our previous 100 foot garden! That was a mistake!) You won't regret it.
vegplot

I'd like to buy a small woodland. With fuel prices soaring and people getting wise to wood it may be a good investment but finding it is difficult.
Chez

I keep looking at woodlands.co.uk wistfully ... I guess the other option is to buy a field and plant some as a long term project.
pookie

or you could buy this:-

'Woodlands For Sale'

The Broadleaf Trust has for sale

61 acres of forest with full planning permission for a 4 bedroomed house 100k
Others.....

Approx 100 acres of forest 100k

20 acres of forest 25k

near Wick, Scotland. Good access, excellent local facilities. Secluded but not isolated.

details 01337 827094
sorry hyjacking a bit here Jo. Embarassed
Mods hope this is ok to post, delete if not-it appears word for word in Country Smallholding mag July '08
wellington womble

Where's the first one? I'm off. DO you think I can pursuade himself to live in a house in the woods? He likes trees.

Sorry, Jo - Have you sourced your stove and stuff, yet? Himself knocked huge chunks off the price of ours buy ordering off the net, not the stove supplier - I can check where he bought, if you haven't.
pookie

The ad reads as though they are all the same place, just been split up I guess.
joanne

wellington womble wrote:

Sorry, Jo - Have you sourced your stove and stuff, yet? Himself knocked huge chunks off the price of ours buy ordering off the net, not the stove supplier - I can check where he bought, if you haven't.


I'd be interested to know where you got yours from - I've got a potential couple of suppliers lined up but to be honest we wanted to wait until we'd opened the fireplace up and had confirmed what state it was before ordering anything

Yesterday however a Park Ray stove with back boiler came up on Freecycle - as it had been replaced - I'm keeping my fingers crossed that we are first in line for it
wellington womble

Free is a better price than we got! I'l check with himself when he gets home. It made most difference on the double skinned flue, which cost a lot more than the stove, as I recall.
RichardW

pookie wrote:

The Broadleaf Trust has for sale


Web link? tried googling them but got nothing
pookie

There isn't one on the ad....sorry Sad
joanne

We have been offered the stove I mentioned above on Freecycle unfortunately its in a bit of a state as it's been outside for a bit

Anyone any idea how easy it would be to bring it back up to scratch? Its a Park Ray boiler stove - Photo below



My other worry is that it looks like it is possibly solid fuel rather than multi-fuel which would defeat the object of the exercise - I don't want to turn down something that is possibly exactly what we want - on the other hand I'd rather spend the money and get what we want rather than something not quite right but free
joanne

Apparently it is Multi-fuel and has been out for about 6 months - We've said yes because even if its useless - it can always go to the scrap yard
alison

What is the black work like.

We sprayed ours, with special paint and you cannot see the scratch that OH did. That would be the asthetics sorted.
vegplot

It looks in pretty good condition. Just replace the fibre ropes and it should be okay. Check the fire ceramics for cracks (you can fill these with fire cement as a short term fix). These fire were once very common in council owned properties so spares should be easy to get. However, I think they prefer anthracite rather than wood as a fuel.
wellington womble

our stuff came from www.stovesonline.co.uk (possibly .com, he isn't sure, I'll check in a bit)

Good luck with the free stove. Looks impressive!
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