Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Aeolienne

Cavity walls - do I have them or not?

I've tried more than once to complete home energy check questionnaires (to see if I might qualify for any grants towards green improvements) but I always get stuck when I'm asked if the building has cavity walls.
(E.g.:
http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/what_can_i_do_today/home_energy_check )

All I can say about the building (block of flats) is that it's in an Art Deco style, which means that it was probably built in the 1920s or 30s. There doesn't appear to be any mention of cavity walls (or lack thereof) in the sundry Land Registry bumf. Any idea how I can find out?

Of course this question may be purely academic if the other residents of the block aren't interested in contributing to eco-home improvements. Neutral
Dee J

Can you see the brickwork on the outside of the building? If so, are the bricks all showing the long side? If so , then you possibly have a cavity wall. If there are very regular ends of bricks showing then it's more likely a solid wall.

At window and door opennings can you see how thick the wall is ... 10" and its solid. 13" and it might have a cavity.

Any help

Dee
cab

Re: Cavity walls - do I have them or not?

Any of the companies that do cavity wall insulation should be willing to come out and give a free estimate; when they do so, they'll determine whether the cavities are filled (which is how we know we have our wall cavities filled).
Treacodactyl

To add to what Dee has said, it's worth checking a few windows. I have a bay window that has a solid base (approx 10" wall) and other windows that are in cavity walls which are about 12" thick including render and plaster.

You might also be able to look inside an air brick to see if there's a cavity, much easier if any need replacing or if you can lift the floor on the ground floor and have a feel.

A more invasive method would be to drill a hole in the wall and see if there is a cavity.
James

I'd also concur with Dee. the easiest way to find out is to look at a window. If the thickness of the wall is over 1ft, you've probably got a cavity. If its less than a foot, you probably havent.

And like treacodactyl said, our from wall is mostly bay windows & has no cavity.

Cavity's tended to be built into walls from the early 30's. Our house is mid 30's and it had a cavity.

There are different materials that can be used for different widths of cavity, so even if you have a very narrow cavity, it can be probably be filled.

The installers will check to see if you have a cavity and what thickness it is when they come to do a survey. This is paid for by your energy surplier, so you've really got nothing to loose by having a survey/ estimate done
vegplot

Are you on the ground floor?
Aeolienne

vegplot wrote:
Are you on the ground floor?

No, the third (and top).
Jonnyboy

Can you get into the roof space?
vegplot

Aeolienne wrote:
vegplot wrote:
Are you on the ground floor?

No, the third (and top).


If the cavity wall, assuming it exists, isn't terminated at each floor then each flat below you will need insulating as well.
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home