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onejohndog

electricity help!

Help....Currently having a rewire done, the electrician thought that the oven would just plug into a 13amp socket but on opening the box it does not have a plug and the connection instructions say it needs wiriing in 2.5mm is this more than the socket cable? will i need another cable running in ?
Jamanda

Hmmm. I'm pretty sure an oven needs one of those special switches on the wall - you sure this is a registered electrician?

Someone will know than me though!

Welcome to the site by the way Very Happy
vegplot

Some smaller cookers will use a 13amp plug but most required a dedicated circuit off the distribution box.
Marionb

I agree with Jamanda - cookers need a special cable and switch on the wall, not a 3 pin plug.

I'm surprised your electrician didnt know that - is he fully qualified etc??
onejohndog

I think he just assumed as the oven was still boxed. He is Part p registered, iwill probably give him a ring as hes not back here for a few days.
vegplot

2.5mm is domestic power circuit and thus can use a 13 amp plug. Normally, cookers require 6.0 mm cable.

http://www.diydata.com/materials/electric_cable/electric_cable.php
RichardW

Is it an electric cooker or a cooker that has a light & a auto sparker that needs power? The former needs a 32amp dedicated supply in 6mm or 10mm cable depending on distance from supply. The latter can be supplied by a 13 amp plug or preferably a fused switched spur. If your sparky does not know whats what & what to do then I would be very worried. Socket cable will be 2.5mm or bigger.

Justme
onejohndog

Thanks for that , the diy site is really usefull.
onejohndog

Hello just me its a fan assisted oven the hob is on the other side ofthe kitchen and ran in thicker cable han the socket cable.
RichardW

House hold fan ovens are ok on a 13 amp fused spur supply normaly. Its the hobs that take all the power especialy when all on at once.

Justme
Helen_A

We're having to get our kitchen redone to be on a 45amp (argh!!) apparently that is the Part P standard once you are looking to plum in more than an oven and a 4 ring hob Sad

Can't stretch to an everhot, as they can go into a standard 13amp socket (or 2 of them for the bigger ovens)

Helen_A
JB

vegplot wrote:
2.5mm is domestic power circuit and thus can use a 13 amp plug. Normally, cookers require 6.0 mm cable.

http://www.diydata.com/materials/electric_cable/electric_cable.php


According to that 2.5 mm is rated to 24 A which is more than a domestic plug. If I'm wiring a socket I would normally expect to use 1.5 mm from the ring to the socket but then use 2.5 mm up for the ring. But on the whole I'd agree with most of the people here that a cooker on a 13A plug seems unlikely.

Presumably this should have a rating plate somewhere or some installation / user manual which should indicate how much power this should use.
RichardW

Yes 2.5mm is rated to more than 13 amp but you wont have just one plug on the ring main (also as its a ring main it can carry more than a single line). Also you have to take into account total cable run lenght & load so you can work out voltage drop. Thinner cables have a higher resistance & therefore higher voltage drop. I think you are only allowed 3 or 4% drop. Using 1.5mm on a short spur will meet the needs of a single socket but what about a double or if you then use an extention / multiplug? The uk system has a large saftey margin built in.


Justme
VSS

Our electric bills went up by about 50/quarter after having the house rewired.
Treacodactyl

VSS wrote:
Our electric bills went up by about 50/quarter after having the house rewired.


Did you just use more equipment?
Dee J

Hi
I'm an electrician (yep... NAPIT part P etc) and I come accross this quite frequently. Many single ovens come equipped with moulded on 13A plugs. Larger and double ovens generally need wiring to a dedicated cooker point. Virtually all electric hobs need a dedicated supply. It's relatively easy to adapt a cooker point to a socket - but not the other way round. The recommended allowance (known as diversity) for a circuit supplying cooking appliances in a domestic setting is 10A + 30% of the rated load of the appliances in excess of 10A. Plus 5A if there's a socket incorporated in the cooker switch.

Electricity bill goes up after a rewire! Either you're using more equipment (or for longer) or there's something seriously wrong. (Or you were stealing neighbours electricity - and now you're not. It happens sometimes with flat conversions and Terraces).

Dee
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