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billfromlachine

Folks, A trick I learned for growing green onions/scallions

Folks,

I thought you might find this trick useful when growing green onions or scallions. If you have a habit of buying them from the store just cut off the white part and plant them root section down.

They'll sprout much quicker than from seed and when you decide to harvest cut them off about 1" above the ground. That way you should be able to harvest the same green onion between 3 to 5 times per year as they'll regrow the green section again and again.

Regards

billfromlachine.
Mistress Rose

Interesting Bill. I have just looked up scallions, as it is a term I have heard, but not known what they are. They are a milder variety of our spring onions, and while others may know better, I have never heard of them being grown in the UK. No doubt like corn on the cob and squash they will come.
billfromlachine

Mistress Rose,

Well considering that one sowing of these green onions/scallions will provide probably for a full year of use it's worth trying to track down some
seeds in the U.K.

If you don't have any luck let me know and I'll get you a packet of seeds to send along. You can supply your local restaurants and/or green grocer
to make a bit of extra quid....lol.

Regards

Bill
dpack

two people divided by a common language? are scallions and spring onions local names for the same thing ? ie young onion shoots.

i grow mine from setts just to add to the confusion.

the cut and grow again thing is ace when they are growing fast
billfromlachine

dpack,

Not quite the same thing the scallions/green onions do not make a bulb.

From what I can tell the spring onions are immature onions that are picked ahead of maturity and if let to grow the entire season would be your standard onions.

Regards
Bill


two people divided by a common language? are scallions and spring onions local names for the same thing ? ie young onion shoots.

i grow mine from setts just to add to the confusion.

the cut and grow again thing is ace when they are growing fast
Slim

Yes, we say scallions to refer to varieties of onion that basically look like mini leeks. Also called bunching onions or spring onions

Nabechan is a good one (Japanese variety I believe) known to be resistant to forming a bulb.

You wouldn't typically bother with sets for these (even if they could be had).


(Hi Bill, neighbor from a bit south of you - they call cilantro coriander leaf as well Rolling Eyes Laughing)
billfromlachine

Slim,

Nice to see someone else from this side of the pond. Some of the terms used in the UK versus North America are a bit different. But I'll get it all sorted out...

Regards

Bill

Very Happy Very Happy
Mistress Rose

I looked them up, and I don't think they are the same. I might see if seed is available here, but I have never seen it. There could be a good reason for that as our climate is completely different to your. Think more Vancouver.

I recently had some Canadian cousins over, and we had great fun about what was found in a British wood. Did we have bears? No, racoons? no, skunks? no, wolves? no. We do have your pesky grey squirrels though. Very Happy A few other terms needed to be explained too, but we managed to work it out between us.
Slim

They'll grow just fine over there
billfromlachine

Mistress Rose,

Yep back in my mispent youth I went out with a gal who was from the UK.

Boot is what we consider the trunk of a car.

Torch we'd call a flashlight.

Glass paper versus sandpaper and many other terms.

Like slim said I'm sure that scallions will grow just fine there and odds are with a bit of mulch all year round. I'll see if I can find a packet for you.

Regards

Bill




I looked them up, and I don't think they are the same. I might see if seed is available here, but I have never seen it. There could be a good reason for that as our climate is completely different to your. Think more Vancouver.

I recently had some Canadian cousins over, and we had great fun about what was found in a British wood. Did we have bears? No, racoons? no, skunks? no, wolves? no. We do have your pesky grey squirrels though. Very Happy A few other terms needed to be explained too, but we managed to work it out between us.
joanne

We grow scallions / spring onions in the UK and they grow really well, there are hundreds of varieties. dpack

the conversation i had with bill and gary ( in NYC ) when i was asking for suitable containers to mix pimms was quite amusing.

"can i borrow your jugs?" was rather confusing for 2 gay guys and then i remembered that a pitcher is not just somebody chatting to a commissioning editor Laughing
jema

and just don't ask for a fag Shan

I've always viewed 'spring onion' and 'scallion' as being interchangeable terms but then I was born in SA. billfromlachine

Shan,

What we call scallions/green onions in North America do not make bulbs and are grown primarily for their green tops. It's also much used in Chinese cooking the chop in up and put in raw in soups or add to stir fries, etc....

Unless I'm mistaken spring onions in the UK are imature onions with small bulbs, someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Here's a short video explaning scallions/green onions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSeKPGGZG4o

Regards + HH

Bill



I've always viewed 'spring onion' and 'scallion' as being interchangeable terms but then I was born in SA. Mistress Rose

Bill, looking them up, scallions and spring onions are not the same, but generally spring onions and the large ones we harvest in autumn aren't either I don't think. Large onions can be used as spring onions, but think they are slightly different usually. pollyanna

In the South Wales valleys they were called gibbons; but I haven't heard them called thus since my childhood. billfromlachine

pollyanna,

I checked and it appears gibbons or jibbons is a term for them predominently in Wales.

Here's some more info to mull over....lol.

https://ca.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061109085024AArrxoN


In the South Wales valleys they were called gibbons; but I haven't heard them called thus since my childhood. Slim

Bill do you get into eating any ramps in the spring?
They don't have the species in the U.K. (to my knowledge) but they do have ramsons which are also a wild allium.

(Just thought I'd throw out some more confusing allium names for people to mull over)
dpack

three cornered leek, a small allium which (as you guessed ) a triangular stem. quite tasy

just for fun garlic mustard (which is not an allium but one of the brassicas ) and also called jack by the hedge is a bit strong but a little is ok in a mixed salad or minor potherb Rolling Eyes
billfromlachine

Slim,

We do have wild garlic or ramps growing where I live. Since the wild ones have been overharvested by people were restricted to harvest 25 bulbs max, which certainly isnt much to last the year.

My dental hygienist has a patch growing in her garden so maybe if I suck up to her she will give me some to replant in my garden. Just have to bring her some home made preserves as barter medium.

Her father gave her some which he picked in the country to start the patch so it keeps expanding.

Here is a video of someone harvesting them in Ohio.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nptiaHxTr0I

Regards

Bill

Bill do you get into eating any ramps in the spring?
They don't have the species in the U.K. (to my knowledge) but they do have ramsons which are also a wild allium.

(Just thought I'd throw out some more confusing allium names for people to mull over) Slim

It's a long process, but you can gather seeds (well, you can here, check your own Canadian rules first!)

If you get them into some good ground with leaf litter by the fall you may see the tiny seedlings next spring - but they won't be worth harvesting for years!
billfromlachine

Slim,

Yep Ill definitely go with an established clump in a barter exchange rather than waiting many years for the first harvest.

Regards

Bill

It's a long process, but you can gather seeds (well, you can here, check your own Canadian rules first!)

If you get them into some good ground with leaf litter by the fall you may see the tiny seedlings next spring - but they won't be worth harvesting for years! Mistress Rose

Your ramps are rather different from our wild garlic. For a start, wild garlic leaves are used rather than the bulbs. We have lots of it in the woods, and have found the only way to control it is by letting the light in, although it comes back when the canopy closes again. Our wild garlic has very tiny bulbs, so not really worth eating. The flowers are also used by some people in a salad. Shan

Flowers are also rather nice sprinkled on top of a soup. Ty Gwyn

In the South Wales valleys they were called gibbons; but I haven't heard them called thus since my childhood.

In the Welsh speaking parts of the South Wales valley`s your Gibbons are called Shibwns,

My Granny,my Mothers Mother from Hereford called them Gibbons.
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