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cab

Foraging on holiday in Brighton

Although we didn't pick anything (weren't self catering) heres some of the snapshots. Putting these here partly 'cos I'm thinking through what I've got here, haven't got everything fully ID'd. Also posting 'cos there are some nice pics. Shrunk down a long way to post, if anyone wants a bigger version posting to help IDing other specimens then just holler.

Anyhoo... Heres some seakale from Brighton Beach. Gorgeous stuff but in most plaes too scarce to pick:



Heres tree mallow. Lots of this on the South Coast, and its been spreading North I think. Edible but not exciting, with common mallow being waaaay better. Still, pretty:



cab

Took loads of pics of both bluebells (which you can't eat) and yellow archangel (which you can, but it isn't worth it if you can instead find nettles or white dead nettles or indeed nearly any other green) in a woodland we visited. Yellow archangel is an exciting plant to just stumble across in a wood, expecially when its growing under small leaved lime. You're pretty certain then that you're in an ancient woodland.

Posting this pic 'cos I like it, and it has both of the flowers in it. Loads of close ups too if anyone wants:

cab

Loads going on in this picture; note that there are loads of alexanders growing here (edible and excellent), but what I want to know about is the wild leeks. Genuine wild leek or sand leek? Neither would seem likely on Brighton beach would they? Or am I being daft?


cab

Edible and not to my tastes; pat on the back to anyone under the age of 35 who can say what this is, and a second pat on the back if they can say why I might find it in Brighton:

Treacodactyl

Elm flowers/seeds as Brighton cuts out any elm tree that shows the slightest signs of Dutch Elm Disease.
cab

Treacodactyl wrote:
Elm flowers as Brighton cuts out any elm tree that shows the slightest signs of Dutch Elm Disease.


Spot on! For various reasons you find more elm trees there than in most other towns these days. Although there are isolated pockets of good sized elms elsewhere too.
cab

Only see a little of this in these parts, Silverweed. I've found it growing from Tintagel to Berwick, and now from Brighton to Calanais... So its got a broad distribution in the uk! Edible and quite nice young shoots, roots tastier.
doctoral

cab wrote:
Loads going on in this picture; note that there are loads of alexanders growing here (edible and excellent), but what I want to know about is the wild leeks. Genuine wild leek or sand leek? Neither would seem likely on Brighton beach would they? Or am I being daft?




Not quite on Brighton beach, by the looks of it and I would say wild, rather than sand.
cab

They were bang on Brighton beach, up by the electric train thing.

I thought wild leeks were really, really rare and rather restricted in distribution? Thats why I'm confused. Could be naturalised rather than wild, but there were several clumps of them.
gil

cab wrote:
yellow archangel (which you can, but it isn't worth it if you can instead find nettles or white dead nettles or indeed nearly any other green) in a woodland we visited. Yellow archangel is an exciting plant to just stumble across in a wood, expecially when its growing under small leaved lime. You're pretty certain then that you're in an ancient woodland


Got any photos of the tops of archangel leaves, Cab ? If they are kinda stripy, I've loads at home under the big trees. I'd always thought they were deadnettle with yellow flowers. And does it spread ?
starmoonlilly

I didnt know Silverweed was edible, used to have loads of it at one house I lived at Sad
Jamanda

gil wrote:
cab wrote:
yellow archangel (which you can, but it isn't worth it if you can instead find nettles or white dead nettles or indeed nearly any other green) in a woodland we visited. Yellow archangel is an exciting plant to just stumble across in a wood, expecially when its growing under small leaved lime. You're pretty certain then that you're in an ancient woodland


Got any photos of the tops of archangel leaves, Cab ? If they are kinda stripy, I've loads at home under the big trees. I'd always thought they were deadnettle with yellow flowers. And does it spread ?


We have lots of variegated yellow archangel near here, but I believe they are garden escapes. I think the indigenous one has plain green leaves.
cab

gil wrote:
Got any photos of the tops of archangel leaves, Cab ? If they are kinda stripy, I've loads at home under the big trees. I'd always thought they were deadnettle with yellow flowers. And does it spread ?


Yes, I have pics at home. I'll post later, remind me!

The stripy one is an introduction, and it isn't very tasty. Try it though, you may like it.

The native one doesn't have such bold patterning on the leaves. Also not particularly tasty, but edible. Rather like white dead nettle.

Both can spread (as can any of the archangels, or dead nettles, they're in the same camp) but it is interesting that the native yellow archangel rarely spreads far outside ancient woodlands, in fact it is usually considered an indicator species of ancient woods (which is why when you find it alongside small leaved lime, another indicator species, its time to start getting excited, you're standing in a genuine ancient woodland).
cab

starmoonlilly wrote:
I didnt know Silverweed was edible, used to have loads of it at one house I lived at Sad



Only when young, at least the shoots. I'm told that the roots are scrummy, but I've never tasted them.
doctoral

... try hop shoots, they should be native around your way ... maybe a little later ...
cab

doctoral wrote:
... try hop shoots, they should be native around your way ... maybe a little later ...


No, here in Cambridge the hop shoots are good now. At least in my garden they are. Good point actually, I might see if I've got time to ride out and pick some wild this weekend.
cab

gil wrote:

Got any photos of the tops of archangel leaves, Cab ?


As promised. These ones aren't stripy, but they have raindrops (a precious commodity I'd love to see around here!) on the leaves.


gil

yep, that'sdefinitely it, but the leaves here are stripier. Thanks for that, Cab.
Jamanda

gil wrote:
yep, that'sdefinitely it, but the leaves here are stripier. Thanks for that, Cab.


I can get a photo of the introduced variegated one to compare if you like.
cab

gil wrote:
yep, that'sdefinitely it, but the leaves here are stripier. Thanks for that, Cab.


Yeah, you've got the introduced one. Quite aggressive spreading plants, I believe. Googling for that form brings up a nice picture here:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/113782/
gil

cab wrote:
Quite aggressive spreading plants, I believe.


You're not exaggerating
doctoral

cab wrote:

Yeah, you've got the introduced one. Quite aggressive spreading plants, I believe. Googling for that form brings up a nice picture here:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/113782/


Sad VERY agressively spreading around here - a bit like the bindweed and ground elder, unless I keep pulling them up/digging them out.
gil

I'll be adding archangel to the weed destruction list. Already got ground elder and bindweed. Among others.
doctoral

gil wrote:
I'll be adding archangel to the weed destruction list. Already got ground elder and bindweed. Among others.


Yep, doesn't even taste as good as ground elder ...
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