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RichardW

Fuel prices

As the is so strong over the $ & oil barrels are priced in $ why do we currently have the highest fuel prices ever?


Justme
vegplot

Re: Fuel prices

Justme wrote:
As the is so strong over the $ & oil barrels are priced in $ why do we currently have the highest fuel prices ever?


Justme


Because we're willing to pay. We're a roll over nation.
cab

Re: Fuel prices

Justme wrote:
As the is so strong over the $ & oil barrels are priced in $ why do we currently have the highest fuel prices ever?


Because even with the high value of the pound against the dollar, demand for oil and fears over fuel security have pushed the dollar price of oil to something like $125 per barrel. Even adusting for exchange rates thats an unprecedented cost for oil in Sterling.
RichardW

Are people buying the same volume of fuel or the same value of fuel?

We have reduced our consumption drasticaly. We now spend less on fuel than before the rises.

Justme
JB

Re: Fuel prices

vegplot wrote:
Justme wrote:
As the is so strong over the $ & oil barrels are priced in $ why do we currently have the highest fuel prices ever?


Justme


Because we're willing to pay. We're a roll over nation.


Or slightly less cynically because oil prices are rising faster than the relative strength of the pound is rising. In fact if you look at the dollar exchange rate over the last 12 months you can see that sterling is doing just as badly as the dollar at the moment.
vegplot

It's not just the exchange rates and the pricing of oil in dollars. We currently pay twice as much for fuel as the USA, taxation is a primary factor here but we're also seeing the start of peak oil. As known reserves dwindle and new discoveries become fewer then the price will naturally rise. We still haven't yet made a significant reductions in our dependancy on oil, in fact it's still growing and showing no signs of slowing.
Brandon

despite it directly affecting my my pocket, I get very excited by high fuel prices, people adjust, and alter the way they do things, social change coming about through financial incentive, how long before people start to localise their lives by default? surely this is all to the good. Yes, I have been known to fly, and I am not opposed to it, but would life be any the lesser without it? If I have to work closer to home, would that be a disadvantage? does anyone acctually enjoy a commute? Many small high streets are in decline, localisation would probably bolster them,

just a thought
vegplot

Not a bad thought either. I was once said, about 15 years ago, to a group of people 'the sooner petrol runs out the better' only to be met with dismay and anger. We're getting close to that point where we can't take fossil fuels for granted any longer and long may it remain so.
Behemoth

Easy to adjust in the cities, might make rural living impossible but for the affluent.
wellington womble

It pretty much is, because of house prices, anyway. That would be nice, though. Presumably, less people would be able to afford to use the road that runs past our house, making the place much quieter, although I will have to fix my bike Wink
gnome

the solution is obvious - plant more trees, crate bigger plankton farms, then just wait 80 million yeas for it all to turn into oil. honestly, do people have no patience these days?
cab

gnome wrote:
the solution is obvious - plant more trees, crate bigger plankton farms, then just wait 80 million yeas for it all to turn into oil. honestly, do people have no patience these days?


Seems like the best solution for all these trees planted in carbon offset schemes. Throw them down worked out coal mines, collapse the ceilings in, come back in 130 million years...
jema

Behemoth wrote:
Easy to adjust in the cities, might make rural living impossible but for the affluent.


Hardly impossible, but it would change expectations.

People really are very spoilt these days, it really is not reasonable to have a home in the countryside whilst working 80 miles away. That would have been almost unheard of 50 years ago!

Even in the towns commutes are now a lot longer, I was walking through the vast soulless new estates of North Swindon recently and contemplating the fact that few residents can be within 6 miles of their workplaces.
cab

Behemoth wrote:
Easy to adjust in the cities, might make rural living impossible but for the affluent.


Might make rural living while commuting large distances regularly impossible.

But the alternative to making such changes in how we live proactively is to be reactive to is as prices rise higher and more rapidly.
OP

jema wrote:
People really are very spoilt these days, it really is not reasonable to have a home in the countryside whilst working 80 miles away. That would have been almost unheard of 50 years ago!

Even in the towns commutes are now a lot longer, I was walking through the vast soulless new estates of North Swindon recently and contemplating the fact that few residents can be within 6 miles of their workplaces.

I think the old concept of working and living in the same area makes a lot of sense, and indeed is government policy ... but that does not stop new developments springing up miles from any likely place of work. I think a combination of high house prices in cities plus planning failures mean that long-distance commuting is inevitable. And of course in the good old days you had job security, whereas these days you might start out living near your work but then get made redundant and have to find work further away.
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