Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Aardvaak

Fuel

I have been thinking of different types of free fuel to burn in a wood burning stove.
One thing came to mind is that I still have a lot of clothes ie heavy suits coats etc., which were my parents who died a few years ago.
Rather than just giving them to a charity shop would they if cut up produce a slow burn in a wood burner or is there something I have not thought of ie is it dangerous or not work.
Green Man

Of course it would work, but may have to be done in small batches to avoid ash could up. Could you do it emotionally though? Another eco use would be to lay them flat in the loft for extra insulation.
Aardvaak

Cho-ku-ri wrote:
Of course it would work, but may have to be done in small batches to avoid ash could up. Could you do it emotionally though? Another eco use would be to lay them flat in the loft for extra insulation.


I take your point - yes another good idea but perhaps might attrack
vermin
SheepShed

Surely the smell of burning clothes would be disgusting ?
Blue Sky

SheepShed wrote:
Surely the smell of burning clothes would be disgusting ?


Yeah, not to mention the thick black smoke. Shocked
Behemoth

Better on the compost?
tahir

SheepShed wrote:
Surely the smell of burning clothes would be disgusting ?


Yeah, burning wool Shocked
Shane

Why do you want to burn these things, anyway? Is it because you want free fuel, or because you perceive it to be better for the environment than burning fossil fuels?

I would have thought that clothing would burn pretty rapidly in comparison to wood or coal, so it's not likely to last long, or give as intense (i.e. usable) a heat. If there's any polyester, nylon or other non-natural material in there it's going to a) produce toxic fumes, b) foul your fire and flue and c) stink to high heaven.

Environmentally, I'd have thought you were better burning wood and giving the clothes to charity so that somebody else can buy them, hence removing a need somewhere in the chain for somebody to buy a new set of clothes and in so doing support their manufacture and transport.
Aardvaak

Shane wrote:
Why do you want to burn these things, anyway? Is it because you want free fuel, or because you perceive it to be better for the environment than burning fossil fuels?

I would have thought that clothing would burn pretty rapidly in comparison to wood or coal, so it's not likely to last long, or give as intense (i.e. usable) a heat. If there's any polyester, nylon or other non-natural material in there it's going to a) produce toxic fumes, b) foul your fire and flue and c) stink to high heaven.

Environmentally, I'd have thought you were better burning wood and giving the clothes to charity so that somebody else can buy them, hence removing a need somewhere in the chain for somebody to buy a new set of clothes and in so doing support their manufacture and transport.


I was thinking of "free fuel" but after comments on here about rapid burn, smell,toxic fumes fouling the flue etc.,etc., I now think it is not a good idea to burn them.
If I give them away to charity I get nothing I had thought of trying to use them to help us - I asked all you for your thoughts and I am pleased you have informed me - I did think of putting them on Ebay then using the money to pay for fuel but I did'nt think anyone would buy them.
I actually wonder if the charity shops want them as they can be picky so it might be the tip for them.
Behemoth

If the charity shop wont take them and you've got a compost heap, that's the place for them rather than landfill or some tips have rag bins for recycling.
Blue Sky

Second thoughts ... I'd burn just about anything here at the moment. It's so friggin' cold and a bitter wind is blowing through the crevices Shocked
marigold

If the garments are made from natural fibres you could cut them up and make a patchwork blanket before composting the unusable bits. My gran had a fab patchwork bedcover made from squares of old tweeds backed with an old grey blanket. It had a lovely substantial feel and was really cosy.
Treacodactyl

Simon wrote:
It's so friggin' cold and a bitter wind is blowing through the crevices Shocked


Put some trousers on then. Wink
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home