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Jam Lady

It's July

It's July. That means it is hot. And humid. And you know what that means, right?



It's time for chanterelles! Here's today's haul. Chanterelles and chicken, tonight.
dpack

yum
gz

and the wild cherries here are STILL not ripe... Sad
Mistress Rose

Sadly our one wild cherry is rather a long way up, so we never see any cherries. I have had them from other trees in the past though, and they are rather good, although the cherry brandy made from them wasn't much to my taste. We seem to be in raspberry season in the woods at the moment, but not sure if I will have a lot of time to pick this week.

Jam Lady, those chanterelles look good. We occasionally get a few, but it has been quite dry here lately. We have rain forecast for later in the week, so perhaps we may get some next week.
sgt.colon

They do look yummy. I've never had them though, which is a shame as I love mushrooms.
Jam Lady

Dinner last night was quite yummy. The chanterelles were prime - open the refrigerator and their perfume just wafted out. We had chanterelles sauteed with onion, diced the leftover broiled chicken thighs from the night before, served over rice.

I am apparently a creature of habit - my previous Foraging entry from August 2018 was about chanterelles AND the identical menu. Too funny!
Mistress Rose

Sounds good. Ir you enjoy it, why change.
Jam Lady

Why change? Because last night we had chanterelles sauteed with onion, green peas, pan broiled shrimp served over rice. And that might have been even a little better.
dpack

as a stuffing in a wild duck they are superb Wink
Jam Lady

Finished off the chanterelles tonight.



Oh yes, also some salmon. And wine, a rose.
Mistress Rose

Seems as if you made the most of them Jam Lady.
Shan

I do love chanterelles. Never been fortunate enough to forage them but occasionally, I do buy them if they don't look too past their prime.

We once had a load of Morels come up through our gravel. Unfortunately, it has never been repeated.
tahir

Cherries absolute disaster this year (bloody fruit fly), but have harvested Herman and Ruby plums already, some apricots yesterday and even a few loquats Shocked
Shan

Well done you. We got a bowl full of cherries and the birds had the rest.
Mistress Rose

Pity about the cherries. I have had some local ones, and they were beautiful. Their apricots should be ready, but not likely to see them, so will miss another year sadly. Looking forward to the start of the plum season as our farm shop does the full range from early to late.
Shan

Our plums look to be doing well this year. Last year, we seemed to have an issue with all the branches on the one tree snapping and the resulting plums had absolutely no flavour.
tahir

From memory it was rainy as plums ripened last year, that always compromises flavour
Shan

Well, let's hope for some flavour this year because quite honestly, if you had bitten into it blindfolded, it would have tasted of absolutely nothing.
sgt.colon

Apple trees don't seem to be doing well down our allotment this year. The guys next to me, their tree was loaded with them last year, this year, not a single apple.
Shan

Same problem here, not a single apple.

I had read somewhere (don't know how accurate it is) that apples need to be thinned out each year to get a consistent yearly crop.
tahir

Pruning and thinning will help
Mistress Rose

Some varieties can end up cycling to every other year. Looks as if our quince may be doing that. We didn't have any problems at blossom time, but unless they are hiding, can't see may fruits this year.
Jam Lady

We're in a period of brutal summer weather. Yesterday's high temperature was 95 degrees Fahrenheit and humid. Heat index claims it felt like 113 degrees Fahrenheit. Rain Wednesday & Thursday, close to an inch. Yesterday I was able to pick more chanterelles. Today is expected to be even hotter than yesterday. There is a heat advisory through Monday. My hardy banana is loving it.

The two books I'm reviewing for my website this month are "Grow Great Vegetables in New jersey" and "Grow Great Vegetables in Pennsylvania." This morning I am going over to someone's vegetable garden to photograph. They grow artichokes, among other things.
Mistress Rose

Is that globe or Jerusalem Jam Lady? I have grown both, but struggle with globe here as they have trouble surviving the winter. Not sure if it is just too cold or too wet or both. Jerusalem grow well and are pretty easy, but are very hard to get rid of when you have them.

Your weather sounds horrible. It is quite warm here, but nothing like that bad.
Jam Lady

They are globe artichoke, Mistress Rose. She starts them at the same time she sows the first broccoli. They produce the same year they are started but do not winter over. She thinks if she had a hoop house they might survive. They were forming their flower heads when I was there yesterday.

Fabulous, exemplary garden. Grass path around perimeter inside the electric fence, and a wider grass path side to side and through the middle separating the two sets of rows. Rows are 50 feet long and 5 feet wide. Organic. Where she uses plastic sheet as mulch (for Walla Walla onions, for example) it is biodegradable. Most mulching is newspaper or corrugated cardboard with crappy hay or wood chips over it.

She raises everything from asparagus, the aforementioned broccoli, potatoes, corn (sequentially planted), tomatoes, tomatillos, ground cherries, celery, celtuce etc to the artichokes and peanuts and more. There are a few rows of flowers for the bees - her husband has two hives in the vegetable garden area. One double row area is planted to buckwheat both as a green manure and for the bees.



And yes, those are their solar electric panels at the back of the field.

They also have a small orchard with peaches, apples, plums, pears, blueberries, and grape vines.

She has a dehydrator, freezes, and pickles but doesn't do much canning.

I'm invited to come back in a month. You bet I will!
dpack

nice , is that an electric fence around the plot?

i suspect some of the wildlife might enjoy a nice garden as do many domesticated critters.

i did electric to keep piglets out of pumpkins, it looked messy but it worked
Mistress Rose

That looks good Jam Lady. We can't grow a lot of those things as the climate here is generally less extreme than yours with cooler summers and milder winters on the whole. I don't know that we could get much of a crop of globe artichokes in one year. I used to grow them when we lived nearer the coast, but not much luck where we are now. Some people do grow some odd things down by the coast, but never heard of peanuts being grown here. Did know a Belgian man who was in the Congo about the time the Belgians were leaving, and he told me he had peanuts in his garden there. Looked up celtuce as had never heard of it, and it seems we can grow it here; at least the seeds are sold, so assume they stand a chance of growing.
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