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alisjs

low energy light bulbs

ALDI are advertising a good range of bulbs for £1.99 ( 11W, 8W, 5W, SES, bayonet,mini spiral,mini GLS etc) from thurs 20th March
Good deal for these non standard sorts
RichardW

Asda are 80p for standard ones.


Justme
alisjs

I've seen the standard ones for as little as 49p in Netto, but it's harder to find the non standards at reasonable prices
Green Man

Our council has said it has currently no facilities to dispose of spent low energy bulbs.
RichardW

I am after 8 GU10 low energy bulbs (not LED) but they are so costly. cheapest are about £6 each compared to 50p for a halogen one.
Have just fitted two 4 bulb lights in the kitchen & now I dont have 100% low energy b ulbs in the house till I get these changed.

Justme
mr olive oil

low energy gu10s

hi
i have low energy gu10 9watts, at £4.00 each but they do not fit some fittings or rather they stick out a little
if i can be of some help please ask
regards mem
cab

Cho-ku-ri wrote:
Our council has said it has currently no facilities to dispose of spent low energy bulbs.


Does it have facilities for disposing of full fat bulbs?
Green Man

cab wrote:
Cho-ku-ri wrote:
Our council has said it has currently no facilities to dispose of spent low energy bulbs.


Does it have facilities for disposing of full fat bulbs?

Yes in the bin, but low energy ones are not supposed to go in the bin. We were advised to follow the advice of our council, so when I met an environmental officer I asked her, and she said that "Perth and Kinross were not yet in a position to accept them" Rolling Eyes

What do you guys all do with spent Low Energy Bulbs?
vegplot

Tesco Bangor are selling them or 1p each (11 Watt bayonet), maximum 6 per customer per purchase.
Treacodactyl

Cho-ku-ri wrote:
What do you guys all do with spent Low Energy Bulbs?


I used to bin them until I found out you shouldn't. Now I will take them to a shop that recycles them (I think Ikea do) or to the local tip and place them in the electrical goods area.
cab

Cho-ku-ri wrote:

Yes in the bin, but low energy ones are not supposed to go in the bin. We were advised to follow the advice of our council, so when I met an environmental officer I asked her, and she said that "Perth and Kinross were not yet in a position to accept them" Rolling Eyes


Then write to your councillor and your MP and let them know that this is completely unacceptable. Don't stay silent on this.

Quote:

What do you guys all do with spent Low Energy Bulbs?


They seem to last so very long that it hasn't much been a problem. I think we've blown one or two in years, they go back to a shop for recycling.
Green Man

What are you to do if they burst?

I buy my bulbs from a wholesaler who says he doen't take bulbs back when spent Rolling Eyes (Waste regulations or something)
Treacodactyl

I've posted about this before. Look at this: http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climatechange/uk/household/products/cfl.htm

Quote:
How should I dispose of unwanted CFLs, e.g. at the end of their life?

From 1st July 2007, waste CFLs have been subject to the requirements of the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations. Those who sell items such as energy efficient bulbs must provide information to the public about where they can take waste bulbs and other WEEE. Some retailers will also take them back in store. However, most retailers have funded Designated Collection Facilities, in the main at local authority civic amenity sites. From this point, producers of the equipment fund the transport, treatment and recycling, where most of the mercury can be recovered.


Looks like your council should be taking them. As for breakages, again from the above link:

Quote:
How should I deal with a broken CFL?

Although the accidental breakage of a lamp is most unlikely to cause any health problems, itís good practice to minimise any unnecessary exposure to mercury, as well as risk of cuts from glass fragments.

Vacate the room and ventilate it for at least 15 minutes. Do not use a vacuum cleaner, but clean up using rubber gloves and aim to avoid creating and inhaling airborne dust. Sweep up all particles and glass fragments and place in a plastic bag. Wipe the area with a damp cloth, then add that to the bag and seal it. Mercury is hazardous and the bag should not be disposed of in the bin. All local councils have an obligation to make arrangements for the disposal of household hazardous waste at a civic amenity site or household waste recycling centre. The National Household Hazardous Waste Forum runs a website with details of these centres for chemicals, but which also applies to other hazardous wastes (www.chem-away.org.uk/). Alternatively contact your local council direct.
Green Man

Thanks.
mochyn

Our local 'tip' takes them? Potters in Welshpool. I replaced one this morning: first time in years! I put the old one in the new one's box and straight into the recycling crate so it will go to Potters next time but won't get broken en route.
RichardW

Re: low energy gu10s

chateau-carman wrote:
hi
i have low energy gu10 9watts, at £4.00 each but they do not fit some fittings or rather they stick out a little
if i can be of some help please ask
regards mem


Where from?

What watts?


I think I have had more faulty new ones than failed old ones Sad

Justme
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