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sean

Parasol Mushrooms....

Macrolepiota procera, apparently. 99% certain that there are more of them than you could shake a mushrooming knife at on The Commons. Is there anything horrible I could be mistaking for them?
Jonnyboy

I don't think so, they're pretty distinctive.

I checked Rogers and Jordan, and neither mentioned any scary dopplegangers; but you know me and skim reading....
sean

Jonnyboy wrote:
I don't think so, they're pretty distinctive.
... but you know me and skim reading....


Hmmm, full of confidence now...
dougal

There are nasty lookalikes - but they are tiny replicas, a few inches tall. If its big and looks awfully like a parasol awta, then its very very likely a parasol.
Personally, I think I prefer the shaggy ones (though they are said to disagree with some folks). Much more aromatic. The flesh reddens on cutting.
And they don't go all wimpy in 24 hours like real parasols.

There's a nice recipe of Carluccio's, baking a stack of parasols, interleaved with breadcrumbs Gruyere and Parmesan, etc...
Sorry, I'm drooling...
sean

These are massive. Can you dry them? I'll try some tomorrow, so if I'm not posting on monday you'll know why.
sean

Jonnyboy

Enormous, but you are utilising the oft used 'small child trick' aren't you?
sean

Nope, that's the 'normal-sized wife' trick. I'm not a fisherman.
Jonnyboy

Tell your wife she has soft, child like hands, and she should do more washing up. Don't run, she'll be happy you told her.
dougal

Re: Parasol Mushrooms....

sean wrote:
Macrolepiota procera, apparently.

Now, you don't need me to explain the 'macro' bit, do you?

They go very well with eggs and cheese... even for Sunday breakfast. Or should that be, "especially for Sunday breakfast"?

The wee beasties quite like them (so don't delay too long before picking them, and I do know that they don't keep well in the fridge.
I suspect you'd need fairly agressive drying (more agressive than thin Boletus slices), although Crying or Very sad I've never had enough at the wrong time (so to speak) to realise that I should have been trying to preserve them...
Lozzie

That's a fantastic photograph, Sean.
judith

Have you picked 'em yet? Dougal's right about the beasties getting to them if you wait too long. Pick lots as they collapse to nothing when you fry them. I like them best fried up with shallots and pancetta and served on toast (with a fried egg on top if you're feeling fancy).
sean

Going to go and get some this afternoon. There were hundreds at all stages of development, so I'm sure there'll be some good ones. Loads of shaggy ink-caps too.
cab

Hmmm... Tasty. Looks like a good specimen.
sean

Bizarrely, the Commons where we walk the dog suddenly seem to have turned into fungus central. We got some of these this afternoon, and found some Boletus as well. Unfortunately they were manky, but I've never seen any there before.
dougal

Now even remarkably "manky" boletus is good for drying...
dpack

and where did you find them Wink
sean

A long way from Yorkshire.
sean

judith wrote:
I like them best fried up with shallots and pancetta and served on toast (with a fried egg on top if you're feeling fancy).


Did that for supper. Except with onion and smoked streaky bacon, and a squeeze of lemon juice.
Waiting to see if I die in the night now.
judith

sean wrote:
Waiting to see if I die in the night now.


I believe it takes 3 or 4 days before you start to feel the symptoms.
sean

Thankyou for those words of comfort ma'am.
Jonnyboy

sean wrote:

Waiting to see if I die in the night now.


Don't forget to post a warning if you do.
judith

We aim to please.
sean

Still alive.
Jonnyboy

seeing as the future of your soul is in such flux, did you actually enjoy the dish?
sean

Yep, absolutely excellent.
Jonnyboy

then anything which follows is surely a worthy inconvenience
cab

I really like my parasols turned into garlic mushrooms; cut them into segments, dip in batter that you've spiked with loads of crushed garlic, and deep fry. Marvellously garlicy, and very tasty.
dougal

IHMO they have this great affinity for egg (and cheese).
Sliced and dipped in beaten egg before shallow frying in bacon fat, a sort of parasol perdu, mmmm...... and with a bit of grated melting cheese in there too....

I think I'm feeling hungry.
Jamanda

Jonnyboy wrote:
Tell your wife she has soft, child like hands, and she should do more washing up. Don't run, she'll be happy you told her.


Surprisingly Sean didn't pass this on! Can't think why. I took the photo. The hand in question belongs to a six year old. Hence the pudgy fingers and felt-tip marks. I do plenty washing up thanks!

Mrs Sean
Stewy

Laughing
doctoral

Crying or Very sad Shaggies don't agree with my wife (she gets quite sick a few hours after eating them) but I love them dipped in garlicky egg, then breadcrumbs + a few sesame seeds and deep fried. Eat with soy sauce - Common yellow russulas (or marsh variety) are just as good done this way Very Happy
cab

doctoral wrote:
Crying or Very sad Shaggies don't agree with my wife (she gets quite sick a few hours after eating them) but I love them dipped in garlicky egg, then breadcrumbs + a few sesame seeds and deep fried. Eat with soy sauce - Common yellow russulas (or marsh variety) are just as good done this way Very Happy


Yellow swamp russulas and charcoal burners are super with garlic. Common yellow has rather too little flavour of its own to stand up to garlic, I find.
doctoral

Common yellows don't need a lot of garlic, but a little does liven them up, especially if you are goig to dip them in soy sauce - I recommend the Shoyu variety, as I think it has a lighter and better taste than the darker ones. Smile
dpack

shaggy omlette Wink
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