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jamanda

Pierogi

A traditional Polish recipe from my friend Beth's Babchie!

3/4 lbs (340 grams) of potatoes
3c. flour (plus more for rolling out) (390 grams)
Cheddar cheese to taste
1/2 t. salt (2.5ml)
1 egg
1/2 c. milk (125ml)
1 T. sour cream (15ml)
1/2 c. water (125 ml)

I make mashed potatoes (with butter, milk, salt and pepper), then add shredded cheddar cheese until I like the taste. Make them first, so they can cool. You can even make them the day before and refrigerate them so they’re pretty stiff, easier to put into the dough rounds.
Mix the flour and salt in the bottom of a large bowl. You can mix all the wet ingredients together before adding, if you want. Stir the dough together until you’ve incorporated all the flour. Let it rest about 30 minutes before you try to roll it out. It’ll be a little less sticky, more pliable, and you’ll have to use less flour when you roll it.

While the dough's resting, put a pot of water on the stove to boil, and melt some butter in a skillet. Have a baking sheet with parchment or a well-floured tea towel ready for the finished dumplings. Fill a small bowl with water, for dipping your finger into to make the dough edges stick.

Take a piece of dough about the size of a large walnut, roll out on a well-floured surface til it’s maybe 5 inches in diameter. Put a tablespoon of potato filling in the center. Fold the dough in half, dab a little water on one side, and gently squeeze it shut. if you can work the air out of the middle, they’re less likely to break open when they’re boiling. They should be half-moon shaped. Put finished dumplings on the baking sheet until you’ve got maybe 8. Then you can put the batch into the boiling water. Stir them very gently so they don’t get stuck to the bottom, but mostly leave them alone. When they float, they’re done. Put them directly into the melted butter, coat them, then put them in a storage container. Keep going in batches of eight. You can play with the size of the pierogi, the volume of filling, etc. You want an edge of about 1/2 inch. Any more, and they’re too doughy. Smaller, and you risk having them break while they’re boiling.

When you’re ready to eat them, fry some onions in butter until browned, remove from the pan. Add more butter (2 T. maybe) and fry the pierogi until golden on both sides. Serve with fried onions and lots and lots of sour cream.
derbyshiredowser

I was lucky enough as a coeliac of 21 years to come across a Perogi seller who half of the various fillings were gluten free. It was at a farmers market near Ledbury 2 years ago, very addictive .
Nick

I was lucky enough as a coeliac of 21 years to come across a Perogi seller who half of the various fillings were gluten free. It was at a farmers market near Ledbury 2 years ago, very addictive .


Likely these folk. Next village to us. They’re awesome. Both people and food.

http://oldgranarypierogi.co.uk/products/
derbyshiredowser

I was lucky enough as a coeliac of 21 years to come across a Perogi seller who half of the various fillings were gluten free. It was at a farmers market near Ledbury 2 years ago, very addictive .


Likely these folk. Next village to us. They’re awesome. Both people and food.

http://oldgranarypierogi.co.uk/products/

Yes they were exceptionally friendly and very addictive food. There was also a seller of various jams and jellys and I got a jar of Lavender jelly a very unique taste and great on scones
dpack

although i know a bit about polish food i had never met these, big stuffed dumpling in a cloth but not this sort

tt has a horror of any sort of dumpling, so i will reduce the amounts to give them a go, and she can have her "delicious" brassica soup that i consider breaches several international treaties:lol:

they look really good, as do the baked and chickpea versions by nick's chums
Nick

Don’t think of them as dumplings like British or german things. More like a thumpy ravioli, if they’re steamed or boiled. Tiny pasties if fried. In Poland we had them in a soup but in Herefordshire, more with a sauce.
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