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sally_in_wales

Pricing help again please, sock kit

Just developing a sock kit for the smallholders show. You get a choice of wool in roughly 200g skeins like this (enough for two pairs of socks)

a set of handmade walnut double pointed knitting needles and a pattern, end result looks something like this.

Was thinking of 10 a skein for the wool (100% wool, superwash, aran weight in hand dyed shades 200g approx), but how much for a kit? Does 13.50 sound reasonable given that it makes 2 pairs of adult chunky slipper socks?
Stacey

Stop guessing and work out yer hours woman! Very Happy

It's about 11 quid for a kit that gives 100g Opal and bog standard bamboo dpns. Yours has enough for 2 pairs! Hand dyed! Handmade needles! 13.50 is not enough.
sally_in_wales

This one is hard though, the wool came ready skeined, so I just had to dye it in that 'hang it in the pot and go and do something else' way, the needles are batch made and we normally charge about 3.50 a set, and the pattern is a very basic beginners one that I tweaked for this yarn. I want it to be cheap enough to tempt lots of sales (I have about 35 skeins of the stuff!) I normally charge 2.50 for 50g of chemically dyed pure wool yarn, so 10 per hank is sort of right except this was hand dyed whearas my normal range that I sell to the re-enactors is bought in dyed and rehanked for them. Just trying to find the hapy medium between that and the 'sell lots' mark Confused
sally_in_wales

Stacey wrote:

It's about 11 quid for a kit that gives 100g Opal and bog standard bamboo dpns. Yours has enough for 2 pairs! Hand dyed! Handmade needles! 13.50 is not enough.

Ok, thats useful, maybe 16 -18 would be better?
Stacey

This one is 16 for 100g of wool similar to yours

http://curiousyarns.co.uk/sock_kits.html

There's happy medium and there's working yourself into the ground for jack. Sally, there's no 'just' about what you do. Your time and skills are worth charging properly for.
Stacey

sally_in_wales wrote:
Stacey wrote:

It's about 11 quid for a kit that gives 100g Opal and bog standard bamboo dpns. Yours has enough for 2 pairs! Hand dyed! Handmade needles! 13.50 is not enough.

Ok, thats useful, maybe 16 -18 would be better?


For 100g but then you'd have to reskein it I guess.
sally_in_wales

ok, turned into a poll for a broader idea of what might work Very Happy
sally_in_wales

Stacey wrote:
you'd have to reskein it I guess.


I wondered about that, I know reskeining makes it look much funkier but the added time adds cost, and I really want these to be 'must have' show buys Confused
Stacey

sally_in_wales wrote:
Stacey wrote:
you'd have to reskein it I guess.


I wondered about that, I know reskeining makes it look much funkier but the added time adds cost, and I really want these to be 'must have' show buys Confused


I didn't mean for the colours , I meant that you'd have to reskein to get 100g - the colours look lovely as they are. I wonder if people would want 2 pairs of socks in the same colourway.

Personally I don't think price has too much influence over what makes a 'must buy' at shows. If you sell it too cheap people will wonder what's wrong with it. It's hand dyed, hand made needles, made in wales etc etc - being sold by a striking looking couple.
sally_in_wales

Stacey wrote:
I wonder if people would want 2 pairs of socks in the same colourway.


Was going to pitch it as 'his n hers' knitting, is that too corney?
Stacey

sally_in_wales wrote:
Stacey wrote:
I wonder if people would want 2 pairs of socks in the same colourway.


Was going to pitch it as 'his n hers' knitting, is that too corney?


I don't think so - I think that would be a good selling point.
sally_in_wales

Took me one gentle evening to knit the sock, so I'm hoping it will appeal to relatively novice knitters who like the idea of doing socks for the family. The pattern is basic and simple to follow, so I was going to set it out as a 'fun socks for your loved ones' package and really push the 'socks make great presents' aspect.
Stacey

As long as you don't miss out the fact that it's a luxury kit for beginners. Most beginners start on a ball of acrylic and some metal needles. I can't come up with a price and I think what's throwing me is the fact that it's 200g of (very pretty) yarn.

You need some input from the coven.... errr... sockmakers - where are they all?
Penny Outskirts

Silly question probably, but thinking presents and thinking women and thinking men. (I mean normal people, not us obviously) Women would probably like to knit socks for the men in their lives, most standard men won't wear pink/blue/yellow socks. So do you do browns and greys and creams etc?.

Also, If I were going to knit a first sock, I would probably want to knit a longer one, so could you scale a kit to do one pair of longer boot socks or two pairs of short socks? Perhaps just adapt the pattern a bit?

Hope that helps.

From a price point of view as a buyer, I would think..how much would I pay for a pair of handmade socks? 5.00 or 6.00? So if I'm buying the kit, I would probably not want to pay more than that, as I'm supplying the labour. I know it's Sally's time, but we all know how wonderful her stuff is, the average punter will just look at price. I think 13.50 is maybe what a punter would pay, but it's still a lot for an impulse purchase.
MarkS

Stacey wrote:
Stop guessing and work out yer hours woman! Very Happy

It's about 11 quid for a kit that gives 100g Opal and bog standard bamboo dpns. Yours has enough for 2 pairs! Hand dyed! Handmade needles! 13.50 is not enough.



The marketing & business courses going well then ?

Laughing

My oh says that steiner somethings sell kits for children at exorbitant prices - although they are 'beautiful'.

Apparently
Stacey

Penny wrote:
Silly question probably, but thinking presents and thinking women and thinking men. (I mean normal people, not us obviously) Women would probably like to knit socks for the men in their lives, most standard men won't wear pink/blue/yellow socks. So do you do browns and greys and creams etc?.

Also, If I were going to knit a first sock, I would probably want to knit a longer one, so could you scale a kit to do one pair of longer boot socks or two pairs of short socks? Perhaps just adapt the pattern a bit?

Hope that helps.

From a price point of view as a buyer, I would think..how much would I pay for a pair of handmade socks? 5.00 or 6.00? So if I'm buying the kit, I would probably not want to pay more than that, as I'm supplying the labour. I know it's Sally's time, but we all know how wonderful her stuff is, the average punter will just look at price. I think 13.50 is maybe what a punter would pay, but it's still a lot for an impulse purchase.


You would only pay 5 for a pair of handmade socks? Shocked

The average punter wouldn't be able to buy the same wool to make one pair socks for less than a tenner - even the factory dyed wools are 7 a ball

The cheapest sock kits I can find are around a tenner and that's with 100g of factory dyed wool. The hand dyed ones are about 15 with half the amount of yarn.
Stacey

MarkS wrote:
[
The marketing & business courses going well then ?



It went very well thanks Smile It made me realise that I sell less stuff at lower prices because people assume it's crap Very Happy It also made me realise that underpricing isn't fair to other traders as it gives people a false idea of what things really cost Smile
wellington womble

I agree with Stacey about the two pairs thing. Reskein for one pair, and sell as a kit for about 16 quid. It's lovely You can always do a couple of his and hers for, say, 25 quid in a choice of colours. The natural dye studio sell theirs for around 10 quid for a 100g on ebay, and I'd guess that's your closest equivalent, depending on what the wool is.
frewen

For what it's worth I think around the 15 mark (not that I know anything).
MarkS

very true.

Its been pointed out that my comment might have looked a bit snotty - which is not what I intended.

the big problem is all the cheap stuff coming in from other countries with lower costs. you cant compete on cost and it makes things look expensive to the bod on the street.

for the record I have no idea how much wool costs. Other than a throw away remark from an aussie sheep shearer that a couple of quid a fleece was doing well.

I know that its difficult to get 100% cotton socks and they are not cheap in m&s.
Stacey

wellington womble wrote:
I agree with Stacey about the two pairs thing. Reskein for one pair, and sell as a kit for about 16 quid. It's lovely You can always do a couple of his and hers for, say, 25 quid in a choice of colours. The natural dye studio sell theirs for around 10 quid for a 100g on ebay, and I'd guess that's your closest equivalent, depending on what the wool is.


Or even at 13.50 for 100g - you could say the normal selling price is 16 but it's a wonderwool special or something. I just think they'd be more popular as 100g.
Stacey

MarkS wrote:
very true.

Its been pointed out that my comment might have looked a bit snotty - which is not what I intended.

the big problem is all the cheap stuff coming in from other countries with lower costs. you cant compete on cost and it makes things look expensive to the bod on the street.

for the record I have no idea how much wool costs. Other than a throw away remark from an aussie sheep shearer that a couple of quid a fleece was doing well.

I know that its difficult to get 100% cotton socks and they are not cheap in m&s.

I didn't read it as being snotty - much as I'd love to pull your leg and pretend I was offended Razz

If you do a UK google search for hand dyed sock yarn it shows that the average price is around 10 for 100g (and a lot of them aren't as nicely done as sally's) I think that at events like wonderwool people are going in order to buy hand made, and in sally's case, locally produced goods by small artisan type businesses. I can understand sallys concern about outpricing herself (I'm pretty scared about it myself tbh and i might come away from wonderwool not having sold a thing) but we aren't going to be plonked next to a stall selling cheap third world imports or mass produced acrylic at 50p a ball (at least I hope not or Lee Price will be feeling the sharp edge of my tongue!) The danger is IMVVHO that people will look at something that is so much cheaper than the average and wonder why exactly it's so cheap. I think it's essential to give good value but we're a funny lot of buggers and if something seems too good to be true we don't trust it.
toggle

Stacey wrote:
As long as you don't miss out the fact that it's a luxury kit for beginners. Most beginners start on a ball of acrylic and some metal needles. I can't come up with a price and I think what's throwing me is the fact that it's 200g of (very pretty) yarn.

You need some input from the coven.... errr... sockmakers - where are they all?



ok, if you want a price comparison, check out etsy.

luxury hand dyed sock yarns sell at 10-20 per 100g, dependng on the dyer. for 200g of yarn, you need to be looking at more than 13 quid. I'm also going to link to a knitty to get their opinions on this.
toggle

first opinion i got from chat was that you are selling at half the price you should be
Nick

That from a buyer, or a seller?
toggle

buyer.

and I know she's bought sock yarns at over 10 quid per 100g for handdyed.

thing is, for knitters, sock yarns hold a special appeal, you can buy a luxury skein for 4 times what would be spent on any other type of yarn and it's still 'cheap' because that one skein will make a complete project.
Stacey

Nick Howe wrote:
That from a buyer, or a seller?


Why would there be a difference?
Nick

You don't think someone attempting to sell a product would have a different view on what it's worth than someone who's wishing to buy it?

For example, if it's another seller saying it's worth 30, it doesn't make it true, or useful information.

If it's a buyer saying they'd willingly pay 30, then that's very, very valuable information.

So, useful to know the source. Smile
Stacey

Nick Howe wrote:
You don't think someone attempting to sell a product would have a different view on what it's worth than someone who's wishing to buy it?


No Confused
Stacey

toggle wrote:
thing is, for knitters, sock yarns hold a special appeal, you can buy a luxury skein for 4 times what would be spent on any other type of yarn and it's still 'cheap' because that one skein will make a complete project.


Exactly

The blogging community reflects that in spades.
Stacey

Nick Howe wrote:
You don't think someone attempting to sell a product would have a different view on what it's worth than someone who's wishing to buy it?

For example, if it's another seller saying it's worth 30, it doesn't make it true, or useful information.

If it's a buyer saying they'd willingly pay 30, then that's very, very valuable information.

So, useful to know the source. Smile


Maybe in the normal scheme of things but not in the knitting community.

And a quick search of 'sock kits' reveals how many sites get rapidly sold out of ones that contain hand dyed yarn
Nick

Why?

A seller saying something's worth X doesn't make it so. Because it doesn't make it sold.

A buyer saying something's worth X DOES. Because they're paying it.

I'm not sure it matters what community you're talking about, but, simply put, if that's wrong, then Sally can charge what she likes, and it'll be the right price. Which, clearly, isn't the case, or we wouldn't be having this thread.
Jamanda

I don't know that you would necessarily expect to pay less for a kit than for made up socks. The kit would include needles (nice wooden ones maybe?) and instructions, nicely printed on card so they don't just get thrown away. That's more stuff than just a pair of socks, and the socks will ultimately be better because the customer will have knitted them them selves.

I found these hand knit socks for 17.99 a pair, and I don't think they look as nice as yours. http://www.knittedsocks.co.uk/current_items.php (Sorry the link doesn't want to go nicely)

If I were to buy the kit, I think I'd be more likely to go for longer welly type socks than slipper socks, That would obviously bump the price up, but for that 25 would seem reasonable for a double pack. I like the his & her idea, but the browns/greys for a man and then the pretty colours for the woman.

I can't knit Surprised , so my input may be worthless, but I think I would buy such a set as a present.
toggle

http://www.ekmpowershop5.com/ekmps/shops/iknitlondon/index.asp?function=DISPLAYCAT&catid=88


http://www.ekmpowershop5.com/ekmps/shops/iknitlondon/index.asp?function=DISPLAYCAT&catid=76

http://www.getknitted.com/acatalog/Shepherd_Sock.html
6.50, but that's per 50g


http://www.getknitted.com/acatalog/Sock_Yarn.html


these people are charging as much or more than you are for 100g of yarn with no needles



then lets look at the cost of handmade knitting needles shall we?

http://www.getknitted.com/acatalog/Knitting_Needles.html




and someone find a uk price for socks that rock yarns, actually, any online price will do. IIRC, it's over 20 quid per 100g. or koigu. or any of the other us luxury small batch handpaints.


or comment on the recent auction of rare coloured skeins of hand dyed sock yarn that sold for over 100 quid on ebay.
Stacey

Nick Howe wrote:
Why?



Because the knitting community is like no other I've ever come across. They are extremely honest and very loyal. They share their skills and knowledge freely. It was an eye opener for me as I've come from the arts where people are scared sh!tless that you're going to steal their ideas so they keep everything to themselves.
Stacey

Jamanda wrote:
I don't know that you would necessarily expect to pay less for a kit than for made up socks. The kit would include needles (nice wooden ones maybe?) and instructions, nicely printed on card so they don't just get thrown away. That's more stuff than just a pair of socks, and the socks will ultimately be better because the customer will have knitted them them selves.



Very good point. My soap kits are more expensive than the felted soaps on their own.
toggle

got to agree with stacy there.
Stacey

Sally - one thing I saw when I was looking at sock kits just now was someone offering cheaper extra yarn. So, say the yarn in the kit was 10 they could buy and extra 100g for 7.50 or something. That might be somehting to think about for the his n hers?

The other thing to maybe think about is if you drastically underprice the sock kits will it make your hand made socks look disproportionately expensive?
Stacey

toggle wrote:
got to agree with stacy there.


Shocked

You make that sound like a bad thing Very Happy
Rob R

toggle wrote:
got to agree with stacy there.


Which bit, or all of it?
MarkS

Apparently my last wool wellie/walking socks were 12/pair. In the sale from a list price of 25. Plain gray, from Margaret Howell.

if that helps anyone.


BTW - Tess the spaniel thought they were quite tasty. Not as good as the merino jumper, but not at all bad. Which is why I now have 1 light and 1 dark gray sock.
sally_in_wales

Loads of food for thought there, thanks everyone. Will be doing some more 'manly' colours too, that was a very good point, and I can easily modify the pattern to do either 2 short pairs of socks or one ginormous long pair. Like the idea of doing the pattern on a cardstock so it lasts, that makes loads of sense.

Sounds like 18 might be the price we try, and if they don't go at Wonderwool I'll try a couple of sets on Ebay and see if that sets a price.

Still open to ideas though, its really useful to see the comparisons peopel find and the different perspectives.
toggle

Rob R wrote:
toggle wrote:
got to agree with stacy there.


Which bit, or all of it?


that knitters tend to value someon's time as a creator and share their knowlege.

Think about it, many of us have had someone suggest we sell handknit items for a startlingly low cost, maybe enough to cover the cost of the materials if we are lucky. We remember this and don't tell another crafts person, in this case, a dyer, that it acceptable to undervalue their time and skill.
wellington womble

Sally's not dire! Wink

I suppose the thing about Wonderwool is that if everyone says 'oooh, how lovely, HOW MUCH?!' on day one, you can always drop the price a bit on day two.

You will be putting in little cards or slips with your website details on, so that people can buy more stuff off you later, won't you? Sock kits are likely to go to beginners (at least at socks) so might come back for more, later and at somewhere like Wonderwool, it gets surprisingly difficult to remember what came from who a week or two later.
Jamanda

Would you get that many beginners at Wonderwool? Or are you looking to sell to shops who would stock your kits?
toggle

knitters also have a habit of trying to spread their addiction to all others. A nicely presented sock kit, with beginner level instructions (have your instructions road tested by someone not experienced in sock making) would be picked up by a knitter for a parent, cousin, child, friend because we want to give them something nice and they have already made 3 garter stitch scarves.
Penny Outskirts

Stacey wrote:
Nick Howe wrote:
You don't think someone attempting to sell a product would have a different view on what it's worth than someone who's wishing to buy it?


No Confused


They have very different views, I think. One is intimately involved with the product, know the in's an the out's of it, in fact has too much information, and is often much too close to it to make a proper valuation of it's "worth" to a customer.

A standard customer just thinks "Oh! Hand knitted socks, I've always fancied having a go at that, that would be nice. 23? Shocked Not that nice....." Unless you knew the price of all these yarns, and you knew the rarity of what you were getting, and knew how much hand knitted socks cost. As a casual buy from a fair, I don't think that would happen at that price. If all the people who are coming through Wonderwool are going to know the value of the wool and the things they're buying, then why would they want a beginners sock kit? What something is worth is only what someone is willing to pay for it. Yes exclusivity is important, as is perceived value, but not as a "get people onto the stall" at a fair.
wellington womble

Jamanda wrote:
Would you get that many beginners at Wonderwool? Or are you looking to sell to shops who would stock your kits?


probably - it's a reletively small part of the smallholders and gardeners show at Builth Wells, so there's potentially a lot of people who've gone for other things. And, for some odd reason, people think that socks are hard, so often fairly experienced knitters come socks late. There's nothing like a lovely yarn to tempt a knitter into buying something she doesn't need, isn't sure quite what to do with, and isn't quite sure her skills are up to. Believe me, I know!
toggle

wellington womble wrote:
There's nothing like a lovely yarn to tempt a knitter into buying something she doesn't need



particularly if it's for knitting socks with. there are people who have serious obsessions with socks.



just to add, i have knit 2 pairs of socks and have collected enough yarn for about 15 pairs, inlcuding 2 20 quid skeins and put the effort into making handspun, on a spindle, for socks.





and i have a fairly mild case of sock yarn addiction.
lottie

Why all the dull shades for men bit? my O.H. loves red socks which I have trouble getting---if I could get a kit with a SIMPLE pattern to knit him some socks as a pressie I would be prepared to pay for it----but not slipper socks for heavens sake Shocked ----proper ones he would wear Smile
sally_in_wales

lottie wrote:
----but not slipper socks for heavens sake Shocked ----proper ones he would wear Smile


The only reason these are being pitched largely as slipper socks is the thickness of the yarn, they would work under really big boots, but I don't think most people would fit them inside their current shoes, However, I'll have some sample socks knitted up so a prospective buyer could decide whether they would be house socks or bootsocks
Fee

sally_in_wales wrote:
Took me one gentle evening to knit the sock, so I'm hoping it will appeal to relatively novice knitters who like the idea of doing socks for the family. The pattern is basic and simple to follow, so I was going to set it out as a 'fun socks for your loved ones' package and really push the 'socks make great presents' aspect.


It appeals to me, I'm a very novice knitter! I think it's a fabulous present, just something I would buy Smile
Jamanda

lottie wrote:
Why all the dull shades for men bit? my O.H. loves red socks which I have trouble getting---if I could get a kit with a SIMPLE pattern to knit him some socks as a pressie I would be prepared to pay for it----but not slipper socks for heavens sake Shocked ----proper ones he would wear Smile


Sally - Could you advertise the capacity to make up the kits in colours specified by the customer as well as having some to sell then and there?

Boot sock sounds more macho than slipper sock. If my OH was there, he'd just say that he doesn't wear slippers so why would he need slipper socks.
Stacey

Penny wrote:
Stacey wrote:
Nick Howe wrote:
You don't think someone attempting to sell a product would have a different view on what it's worth than someone who's wishing to buy it?


No Confused


They have very different views, I think. One is intimately involved with the product, know the in's an the out's of it, in fact has too much information, and is often much too close to it to make a proper valuation of it's "worth" to a customer.

A standard customer just thinks "Oh! Hand knitted socks, I've always fancied having a go at that, that would be nice. 23? Shocked Not that nice....." Unless you knew the price of all these yarns, and you knew the rarity of what you were getting, and knew how much hand knitted socks cost. As a casual buy from a fair, I don't think that would happen at that price. If all the people who are coming through Wonderwool are going to know the value of the wool and the things they're buying, then why would they want a beginners sock kit? What something is worth is only what someone is willing to pay for it. Yes exclusivity is important, as is perceived value, but not as a "get people onto the stall" at a fair.


But why does that mean that sally should sell her stuff for less than half the price of other people selling the same thing? Confused
Are you a knitter Penny?

Toggle has posted links to similar products and a quick google search shows that the going price is a lot more than sally is thinking about charging.

And with due respect, the fact that you'd only pay 6 for a pair of handmade socks means that you aren't sallys target market Smile
Stacey

Sally - I've been thinking about this in the night (insomnia is a wonderful thing) and I wondered if it might be an idea to do a quick bit of market research re the 200g thing. Personally it would put me off as I don't like knitting two pairs of socks in the same yarn. I'd buy one of your 100g kits for 16 - 18 but but not a 200g one. In my head I would be paying for yarn that I'm not going to use. It may just be me that thinks like that so maybe between us we could ask on knitting groups etc?
wellington womble

toggle wrote:
wellington womble wrote:
There's nothing like a lovely yarn to tempt a knitter into buying something she doesn't need


particularly if it's for knitting socks with. there are people who have serious obsessions with socks.

just to add, i have knit 2 pairs of socks and have collected enough yarn for about 15 pairs, inlcuding 2 20 quid skeins and put the effort into making handspun, on a spindle, for socks.

and i have a fairly mild case of sock yarn addiction.


True - despite the fact that I am perfectly capable of knitting socks (I have knitted 2 and 3/4 pairs now!) and collected at least 5 more sets of yarn and some spinning stuff for socks, I would still buy one of Sally's kits (if she has any left!) because I love handmade needles, and have never seen walnut ones, and becaus the yarn is lovely colours. And because patterns are always interesting and different. Almost all handknitted socks are too chunky to wear under ordinary shoes. And heavy yarn is quicker to knit

I have a fairly mild addiction too. Honest!
Stacey

wellington womble wrote:
toggle wrote:
wellington womble wrote:
There's nothing like a lovely yarn to tempt a knitter into buying something she doesn't need


particularly if it's for knitting socks with. there are people who have serious obsessions with socks.

just to add, i have knit 2 pairs of socks and have collected enough yarn for about 15 pairs, inlcuding 2 20 quid skeins and put the effort into making handspun, on a spindle, for socks.

and i have a fairly mild case of sock yarn addiction.


True - despite the fact that I am perfectly capable of knitting socks (I have knitted 2 and 3/4 pairs now!) and collected at least 5 more sets of yarn and some spinning stuff for socks, I would still buy one of Sally's kits (if she has any left!) because I love handmade needles, and have never seen walnut ones, and becaus the yarn is lovely colours. And because patterns are always interesting and different. Almost all handknitted socks are too chunky to wear under ordinary shoes. And heavy yarn is quicker to knit

I have a fairly mild addiction too. Honest!


I also have a fairly unmanageable stash of sock yarn. I think it's because they're portable, relatively unexpensive (in terms of buying 600g of yarn for a jumper) and for a little effort you get a complicated looking end result. I've been wondering if there's a bit of an ebb in the knitting frenzy that we've recently seen but it doesn't seem to apply to socks.

How do you feel about the 200g of yarn?
toggle

Ok, the basic thing I'm getting from knitting forums is following yarn harlot's lead and trying to cut down on having loads of yarn in the house they will never knit. There's a huge stash reduction thing going on amongst some of the on-line knitting communities.

However, there's the other factor, sock yarn doesn't count when you go on a yarn diet, and it doesn't count as stash, so it's the only thing you can buy when you really don't need anything else.

Now the whole thing may seem a bit strange, but these people are the target market for a luxury hand dyed yarn kit. So use their strangeness to your advantage as a seller.
Stacey

Also - are you intending on putting all the yarn in kits or will you have some available for sale on its own?

Sorry - sally - I'll leave you alone soon Very Happy

(I'm on the pooter for a bit as ironically I'm putting my prices up today Shocked )
toggle

If I was going to sell the kit, I would definitely reskein it. at the very least into 2 100g skeins that will look better when skeined at a different length to show off the colours. Stack up the skeins, don't stick all one colour together, go for a riot or rainbow effect, should be enough yarn there to see at least 30 feet away as yummy.

offer 2 different colours per kit for about 25, basic kit with 100g for at least 2/3 of that. People will go for the big kit as better value.

Then, add a small cloth bag holding the kit, preferably drawstring. market it as a bag to keep your socks in progress in as you travel, socks are a small portable knitting project, ti's not like toting a jumper about......

That's a small added expense, and doubles the appeal of the kit.
hedgewitch

I've voted for 16 as you want a quick seller, but I'd be prepared to go upto 20 myself. And I don't think that is expensive.

I'm not a knitter - I have only ever managed a couple of scarves and a dodgy jumper. But I am interested in knitting. I have no-one to actually show me how to knit and I've been wondering about a kit for socks as it seems nice and easy-ish but more of a challenge than a scarf.

I like the quality of the yarn and the needles. I want a knitting project to be a lovely, tactile experience not hacking at a ball of acrylic with a couple of plastic needles. I want a pattern that is easy to follow, and would gladly pay for this and the expertise of the person putting the kits together if I was confident that I could follow the pattern (which I am with Sally, from what I know of her on here).

I think all this is worth paying for - it's this expertise and experience you're selling as much if not more so than the materials themselves.

I wouldn't know where to start buying/sourcing a pattern suitable for a beginner, let alone buying the wool and the right needles. So the kit is great.

Things that would put me off are wool for 2 pairs of socks. It's a big commitment and I'm a beginner. I'd pay the same price for wool for one pair if you see what I mean?

Also I'd probably like more muted colours, but that's very personal and don't go off me as I know most people like bright colours.

Hope this helps.
sally_in_wales

Some excellent ideas there as always. I may put some of the yarn out in big hanks for whatever purpose someone might want, and reskein some down to 100g for the kits and price those as a one pair of socks kit. Great idea about the bag, I had been planning on using fairly good quality (so endlessly reusable) ziptop plastic clear wallets, but a cotton bag could be much more fun, shouldnt take too long to make some up or I could buy them in, maybe do an iron on transfer for the front with something suitably knitting inspired on it Confused
toggle

Next, you are not selling a bargain, you have to market this as a luxury thing. Lots of knitters get this. YOu see the people selling handdyed stuff on etsy. I'ts a luxury, craftsperson made product that needs to be marketed as such and presented as such.

you can't make any money selling it as a bargain. If 5 bargain hunters walk away from you, then so be it, because you've made the money you would have got from them, from the one person who wanted a luxury product, and you've spent the time making one kit, not 5.

You have to value your product in order to sell it as a product that has value. The sooner you start thinking of a craftsperson dyed yarn as a luxury product, the way your market does, the better it will sell. Dyeing isn't how to get the yarn off the stall, it's an art.
toggle

sally_in_wales wrote:
Some excellent ideas there as always. I may put some of the yarn out in big hanks for whatever purpose someone might want, and reskein some down to 100g for the kits and price those as a one pair of socks kit. Great idea about the bag, I had been planning on using fairly good quality (so endlessly reusable) ziptop plastic clear wallets, but a cotton bag could be much more fun, shouldnt take too long to make some up or I could buy them in, maybe do an iron on transfer for the front with something suitably knitting inspired on it Confused


a logo's bag would be great, particularly if ti's got your web address on it, so the knitter and her friends get a reminder of where they got this nice kit from and go want more and look at the other lovelly stuff you sell.
hedgewitch

I love the bag idea Very Happy I'd like to be told, as a punter, that socks are an easily-portable project.

Also, again as a punter, if I bought a sock kit, it would be a treat for myself. Toggle and Stacey are right on the luxury thing. I want to know it's something special, and would be prepared to pay for that special thing. And it is special and luxurious.
gil

Think about what it is you are actually selling to people with this kit : not just a product, but an experience :

luxury, hand-dyed wool and
wooden needles (in an unusual wood), but

tried and tested instructions,
a natty bag to put it all in,

and a 'knitting experience', which can either be given as a gift (people's price sensitivity changes when they're looking for presents, as no-one really wants to be thought miserly), or knitted up by the purchaser to make them feel good that they have created something for themself [or a loved one] that will be unique. Going by what others have said in this thread, socks are challenging enough, but achievable.

Have you thought of doing the same thing with a hat kit ?
lottie

sally_in_wales wrote:
lottie wrote:
----but not slipper socks for heavens sake Shocked ----proper ones he would wear Smile


The only reason these are being pitched largely as slipper socks is the thickness of the yarn, they would work under really big boots, but I don't think most people would fit them inside their current shoes, However, I'll have some sample socks knitted up so a prospective buyer could decide whether they would be house socks or bootsocks


Good idea----thickness wouldn't be a problem want them for boots/wellies---he has to wear thin boring blue/black ones with his respectable at work shoes. If the pattern was adaptable for a longer leg size could there be 2 price options slippersock/boot sock to allow for extra wool? socks are a nice idea 'cos it's a small project you can carry about with you not like a jersey.
Stacey

toggle wrote:
Next, you are not selling a bargain, you have to market this as a luxury thing. Lots of knitters get this. YOu see the people selling handdyed stuff on etsy. I'ts a luxury, craftsperson made product that needs to be marketed as such and presented as such.

you can't make any money selling it as a bargain. If 5 bargain hunters walk away from you, then so be it, because you've made the money you would have got from them, from the one person who wanted a luxury product, and you've spent the time making one kit, not 5.

You have to value your product in order to sell it as a product that has value. The sooner you start thinking of a craftsperson dyed yarn as a luxury product, the way your market does, the better it will sell. Dyeing isn't how to get the yarn off the stall, it's an art.


^^^^^

Wot she said x10 Smile
hedgewitch

Stacey wrote:
toggle wrote:
Next, you are not selling a bargain, you have to market this as a luxury thing. Lots of knitters get this. YOu see the people selling handdyed stuff on etsy. I'ts a luxury, craftsperson made product that needs to be marketed as such and presented as such.

you can't make any money selling it as a bargain. If 5 bargain hunters walk away from you, then so be it, because you've made the money you would have got from them, from the one person who wanted a luxury product, and you've spent the time making one kit, not 5.

You have to value your product in order to sell it as a product that has value. The sooner you start thinking of a craftsperson dyed yarn as a luxury product, the way your market does, the better it will sell. Dyeing isn't how to get the yarn off the stall, it's an art.


^^^^^

Wot she said x10 Smile


And I, knowing nothing, would believe the value you give it as a seller. Pile it high and sell it cheap and I'll assume that's all it's worth. Really.
lottie

Agree about the value and quality----If I am buying something to make as a gift I'd like to feel it was worth doing to have a fairly unique end product that gave someone pleasure to look at and wear----so prepared to pay more for it
judith

hedgewitch wrote:
Also I'd probably like more muted colours, but that's very personal and don't go off me as I know most people like bright colours.


Me too. I know I wouldn't buy the brighter colours, but I would be very tempted by a kit with a more "earthy" blend of colours.
I agree with everyone who says that you should market 100g at the price you originally envisaged for 200g. The thought of having enough wool for two sets of socks would be off-putting for a beginner. (Or perhaps provide the instructions, and enough wool, for two pairs of short slipper socks or one larger pair of boot socks, so people can decide for themselves).
lottie

good idea about wool for 2 short or one long pair Judith----would this work out wool quantity wise?
woodsprite

Nothing to add on the wool front I'm afraid, knitting has never been my thing, I'm a sewing bod.
HOWEVER, whatever you decide I for one will be queing up to buy one of the said kits at the Smallholder Show. I can't wait to have a go myself!!!! Very Happy Very Happy
lottie

Me too-----unless I'm moving that weekend
jema

You simply can't play the pile it high game with crafts, and I think you would find that if you relax about selling quickly and build up a well presented inventory of craft items that can be presented on a decent web site, then sooner or later the items will sell.
The math is clear.

item material cost 8.

Sell 3 at 12, profit 12.
Sell 1 at 20 profit 12. work load 33%
toggle

jema wrote:
You simply can't play the pile it high game with crafts, and I think you would find that if you relax about selling quickly and build up a well presented inventory of craft items that can be presented on a decent web site, then sooner or later the items will sell.
The math is clear.

item material cost 8.

Sell 3 at 12, profit 12.
Sell 1 at 20 profit 12. work load 33%



exactly.
tahir

toggle wrote:
jema wrote:
You simply can't play the pile it high game with crafts, and I think you would find that if you relax about selling quickly and build up a well presented inventory of craft items that can be presented on a decent web site, then sooner or later the items will sell.
The math is clear.

item material cost 8.

Sell 3 at 12, profit 12.
Sell 1 at 20 profit 12. work load 33%



exactly.


Yup
sally_in_wales

gil wrote:


Have you thought of doing the same thing with a hat kit ?


I already do an 'acorn cap' kit, and I'm planning on a pixie hat/pointy hat kit too (really really wild colours in a feltable wool and a choice of two patterns in the same kit) Very Happy

You are all wonderful, I'm slowly starting to get my head around this Very Happy
toggle

another thing to consider is a felted slipper kit, make an oversize sock, felt it to make a slipper.
gil

Matching hat and socks set for the more experienced knitter ?

Hat with earflaps and a pair of boot socks (outdoor, rugged; either bright red or sludgy, earthy, neutral)

Nightcap or other hat for wearing/posing indoors and a pair of slipper/indoor socks
Stacey

sally_in_wales wrote:
[You are all wonderful, I'm slowly starting to get my head around this Very Happy


Good! Very Happy
dpack

other ,on practical grounds materials for 2 pairs good socks and a hobby 15
or , supa funky hobby how much cash have they got, his n hers sock knitting needs proper thought and marketing
as a must have maybe 30
nice wool Wink
bernie-woman

Definitely needs to be priced around the 20 mark I think - or even a little more - I bought an Opal sock knitting kit for my first pair of knitted socks which came with 100g of wool - enough to make a pair of socks and it also included the pattern to make a little gift pouch with the remainder (which I never made but appealed to me at the time Confused ) - it had a pair of metal knitting needles (nowhere near as nice as wooden ones) - all for 12.00 and that was 2 years ago Very Happy
sally_in_wales

what about a bag like this? Would look pretty with the wool in it I think Very Happy
bag
Stacey

Very nice - I like that Smile
sally_in_wales

am getting a sample sent through so I can work out if the pattern needs folding in bizarre origami to fit, but its looking the most promising so far, I like th emix of nice eco wossname jute plus a window so you can see whats inside.
lottie

That looks good---when you said cotton bags earlier I wasn't keen 'cos I think you need to see it but that's great. Wish you'd got them now because it'd make a great pressie for my youngest daughters birthday in a couple of weeks---she likes making things---if you do a kit with longer socks and I have to miss smallholders 'cos of housemoving are you thinking of doing mail order?
toggle

sally_in_wales wrote:
am getting a sample sent through so I can work out if the pattern needs folding in bizarre origami to fit, but its looking the most promising so far, I like th emix of nice eco wossname jute plus a window so you can see whats inside.



Ok, I'd be concerned that the material of that would be coarse and catch on the yarn and cause little pulls in it. Also, would a fine sock needle go through the material, it's coarse woven. Although your dpn's for aran won't be that fine, i'd like to use a nice bag for sock weight needles, 2-2.5mm ones. It looks like a lovelly idea, but is it practical? please test it for that.


If you do get those bags, make up some as samples, but keep a lot of the yarn out so it's colours can call customers over to it and so knitters that shop by touch can feel it.

i'm a by touch shopper, I tend to impulse buy only when i get to hold and stroke a yarn. dosen't even have to be anything particularly soft or special, bog standard yarns get this treatment as well, i just have to let it talk to me, tell me what it wants to be made into and whether it wants to be with me. I've walked away from stalls before when there wasn't yarn I could feel out on the table, it was all packaged up in kits and the assistants uhm'd and aaahh'd at me when i asked to feel it. When you know you have me is when I start to cuddle it like a kitten.

[/i]
wellington womble

Definitely yarn is a touchy thing! I like the bags though - never even thought of praciticalities!
lottie

I'm sure the bags will be fine---they look a great idea
toggle

lottie wrote:
I'm sure the bags will be fine---they look a great idea


they do look very nice, I hope they work.
Stacey

Good point about the open weave though, I hadn't thought about that. Fingers crossed Smile
sally_in_wales

Ok, think this is it. You get a generous 100g (mostly a bit more) of hand dyed limited edition machine washable wool, walnut needles, a pattern for quick and chunky socks, all packaged in a very nicely made mini Jute 'shopping bag' which doesnt snag at all and is big enough to carry your project round in or stand on the floor to stop the ball of wool rolling away as you knit Cool

I think 16 or 18 at the moment unless people have strong feelings differently? There will also be more of the same wool available seperately, priced by the gram so if people want to knit monster socks they can get just the wool they need to do that Very Happy
sally_in_wales

Am also doing a Pixie Hat kit in a slight differently sized similar bag, will be photographing that in a few days though, still waiting for some of the wool colours to arrive.
Nick

Assuming you've got a sign with prices on it, make sure you have another one. If they fly out, put the price up, if they don't sell, consider reducing them, assuming you want to sell them (rather than hang on to them for another occasion).
alison

Don't put the price up until I have bought mine though!
Nick

Well, clearly, there'll be a 75% DS discount, on production of your DS membership card.
alison

phew! Cool
sally_in_wales

18 on the ticket, 16 to Downsizers Very Happy
Penny Outskirts

They look beautiful Sally, love the bags too Very Happy
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