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Went

Promoting your business

It strikes me that some small businesses are too reliant on web based services to promote their business at the expense of traditional methods of promotion such as trade shows, newspapers, magazines, direct customer contact etc etc...

Web-based promotion is great if you have the skills, abilities and vision to get it right, otherwise I feel it lets a lot of small businesses down.

I fully realise the advantages of web-based promotion but do you think we are losing out on potential business by ignoring (for the want of a better term) traditional marketing strategies?



Thoughts welcomed. Very Happy
earthyvirgo

I think it depends largely on the business Gawber.

Whilst the web works well enough for me (a slow trickle of print sales), nothing beats direct customer contact.

I always make sure that any online sale or enquire gets a personal response, not an auto or standard reply. It makes a huge difference.

EV
Rob R

I like a diverse range of promotion but have to say that paid for in-print ads seem to only just cover their costs.
sally_in_wales

Some of it is a matter of cost as well, a web based presence is very cost effective, whereas attending a show, taking out a magazine ad etc is phenomenally expensive. I've had several ads over the years in what shoudl have been ideal magazines, often accompanied by an article I'd written, so in theory a very good exposure, but have so far been able to track precisely zero sales or bookings to those ads. Shows often do bring in a few sales in the following months, but again, nowhere near enough to balance the time and expense of attending.

I wish I knew the solution, its such a fine balance as a tiny business between getting enough business to pay the bills and either none at all or more than can be properly attended to
Rob R

Some of it is a matter of cost as well, a web based presence is very cost effective, whereas attending a show, taking out a magazine ad etc is phenomenally expensive. I've had several ads over the years in what shoudl have been ideal magazines, often accompanied by an article I'd written, so in theory a very good exposure, but have so far been able to track precisely zero sales or bookings to those ads. Shows often do bring in a few sales in the following months, but again, nowhere near enough to balance the time and expense of attending.

I wish I knew the solution, its such a fine balance as a tiny business between getting enough business to pay the bills and either none at all or more than can be properly attended to


It's also a case of finely balancing having enough work but not too much/too little.
Went

Some of it is a matter of cost as well, a web based presence is very cost effective, whereas attending a show, taking out a magazine ad etc is phenomenally expensive. I've had several ads over the years in what shoudl have been ideal magazines, often accompanied by an article I'd written, so in theory a very good exposure, but have so far been able to track precisely zero sales or bookings to those ads. Shows often do bring in a few sales in the following months, but again, nowhere near enough to balance the time and expense of attending.

I wish I knew the solution, its such a fine balance as a tiny business between getting enough business to pay the bills and either none at all or more than can be properly attended to


Promoting and marketing is time consuming and crucial to growth so therefore surely worth the time and necessary to incorporate it into the working day.

Tracking your sales/growth in relation to your efforts is an art, science, craft and phenomena that we all struggle with I think.
It's also a case of finely balancing having enough work but not too much/too little.
Chez

I am having this internal dilemma about the farmer's market at the moment. We want to get more footfall and we want to widen our demographic. We are kicking round ways to do that.

A lot of our existing customer-base are older people who don't work. They read newspapers but they don't use the web. Younger people use the web, but they are not able to shop during the day. We are kicking around launching a pre-order scheme - in fact I have updated the website to indicate that individual traders will do orders. We want to move towards a scheme where customers can submit one order every week and collect their box from the market - perhaps in their lunch break from work.

But we have no money for advertising. Literally.

I'd like to do a print run and leaflet the area, but it's a no go Sad.
Rob R

Some of it is a matter of cost as well, a web based presence is very cost effective, whereas attending a show, taking out a magazine ad etc is phenomenally expensive. I've had several ads over the years in what shoudl have been ideal magazines, often accompanied by an article I'd written, so in theory a very good exposure, but have so far been able to track precisely zero sales or bookings to those ads. Shows often do bring in a few sales in the following months, but again, nowhere near enough to balance the time and expense of attending.

I wish I knew the solution, its such a fine balance as a tiny business between getting enough business to pay the bills and either none at all or more than can be properly attended to




It's also a case of finely balancing having enough work but not too much/too little.

Promoting and marketing is time consuming and crucial to growth so therefore surely worth the time and necessary to incorporate it into the working day.

Tracking your sales/growth in relation to your efforts is an art, science, craft and phenomena that we all struggle with I think.

That's all very well but I can spend time and money in the office doing just that but if it ends up costing the business more because it a) doesn't yield a net gain or b) doesn't leave you with the time to feed the animals or make the goods then you may as well just spend the money down the pub. You have to pace yourself as you don't have the economies of scale that larger businesses have and you need extra capital to fulfil any great improvement in sales. Personally I could spend half the week doing farmers markets, but then I'd have to employ someone to do my job back home, so the markets have not only got to cover the cost of that but also supply the extra capital and provide a significant margin on top to make it all worthwhile.

ETA - in the past year we've done ads, got onto facebook & twitter, donated produce to charity, entered awards, done a magazine article & got married.
vegplot

Web based marketing has it's own benefits and pitfalls much like traditional methods do. From my experience its not the tools which are the issues but they way they're used and a good marketeer will be the one who can use the right tools to the greatest effect.

Neither should be dismissed and it's a fool who ignores either but a bigger fool who blindly uses a tool which they have little knowledge of as it can inflict a great deal of self harm.
Went

Web based marketing has it's own benefits and pitfalls much like traditional methods do. From my experience its not the tools which are the issues but they way they're used and a good marketeer will be the one who can use the right tools to the greatest effect.

Neither should be dismissed and it's a fool who ignores either but a bigger fool who blindly uses a tool which they have little knowledge of as it can inflict a great deal of self harm.

Agreed. I have talked to a couple of people this week who are now solely reliant on web-based marketing and promotion - the problem is that they have no clear idea of why they are doing what they are doing over and above because it's the internet. In both cases, their efforts are poor.
Went

I am having this internal dilemma about the farmer's market at the moment. We want to get more footfall and we want to widen our demographic. We are kicking round ways to do that.

A lot of our existing customer-base are older people who don't work. They read newspapers but they don't use the web. Younger people use the web, but they are not able to shop during the day. We are kicking around launching a pre-order scheme - in fact I have updated the website to indicate that individual traders will do orders. We want to move towards a scheme where customers can submit one order every week and collect their box from the market - perhaps in their lunch break from work.

But we have no money for advertising. Literally.



I'd like to do a print run and leaflet the area, but it's a no go Sad.
Is there scope to pop a small note in with their purchase with details of the scheme?
vegplot

Web based marketing has it's own benefits and pitfalls much like traditional methods do. From my experience its not the tools which are the issues but they way they're used and a good marketeer will be the one who can use the right tools to the greatest effect.

Neither should be dismissed and it's a fool who ignores either but a bigger fool who blindly uses a tool which they have little knowledge of as it can inflict a great deal of self harm.

Agreed. I have talked to a couple of people this week who are now solely reliant on web-based marketing and promotion - the problem is that they have no clear idea of why they are doing what they are doing over and above because it's the internet. In both cases, their efforts are poor.

There is a popular and well intended if very naive perception that putting stuff on the web is all one needs to do to get noticed.
Chez

Not even cash for that at the moment, we're on very short funds until the warmer weather brings the seasonal stallholders Sad. We do leaflet sometimes and people seem to appreciate it.

We need *new* customers, too, though, rather than the established pool, which means pavement pounding, I think.

I have a good twitter following but I need to get it to drive more traffic to the fb page - I can use that for special offers etc.. I probably need to start a new thread for this rather than hijack this one.

I think you are right in your original premise, anyway - whether you are using high or low tech marketing, it doesn't matter a damn if you are targeting the wrong group or, indeed, not targeting anyone and just being wishy washy. And as a small business you need to balance time as one of your marketing inputs as well as cash.
boisdevie1

Henry Ford once said that half of his advertising budget was wasted but he didn't know which half.

So much depends on the nature of the business. I'm developing a business idea at the moment for a product which will be sold over the web. It's a niche product and I know exactly which niche print outlets I can use to hit exactly my target audience and drive them to my website.
welsh veg grower

ah the world of business and marketing its so confusing yet so simple, take a product offer it to a client and make a sale. All other activities tend to be for personal pride.

The best marketing is to idetify your target market and go and meet them, speak to them tell them what you do and ask them will they buy it.

For example chez with your box scheme (which sounds fab to me) why dont you make up a mixed box and pop into some of the businesses near to the market next time and show them what you can do. Leave them with a small (like an A5) flyer even if you print a few yourself which tells them how to make an order and even better offer to place the first order for them ready to collect next week. For me the easier it is to buy from you the better.
Frazzled_Barbie

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?. vegplot

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?.

That can backfire. For instance, if you recommend a new customer and get a discount then you feel good as you've got a discount. But the next time you buy the price is back to normal as you haven't introduced a new customer then you'll see a price increase which is never a good thing.
Frazzled_Barbie

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?.

That can backfire. For instance, if you recommend a new customer and get a discount then you feel good as you've got a discount. But the next time you buy the price is back to normal as you haven't introduced a new customer then you'll see a price increase which is never a good thing.

Mmmmm fair point.
Rob R

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?.

That can backfire. For instance, if you recommend a new customer and get a discount then you feel good as you've got a discount. But the next time you buy the price is back to normal as you haven't introduced a new customer then you'll see a price increase which is never a good thing.

Mmmmm fair point.

Surely the new customer has to buy at full price and it's the introducer that gets the discount?
Frazzled_Barbie

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?.

That can backfire. For instance, if you recommend a new customer and get a discount then you feel good as you've got a discount. But the next time you buy the price is back to normal as you haven't introduced a new customer then you'll see a price increase which is never a good thing.

Mmmmm fair point.

Surely the new customer has to buy at full price and it's the introducer that gets the discount?

Yes - that is what I meant
welsh veg grower

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?.

if you are selling on line this can be ideal as there is software (not expensive) which will allow you to set up discounts and or cash back so if I introduce a customer and they spend 100 I get 5% or 5 from you, if they buy from you again I keep getting the cut if they intriduce someone they get the cut. No one gets a discount as I may not buy from you again especially if it is a one of purchase. These kick backs can work but only if set up corectly and legally.
Frazzled_Barbie

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?.

if you are selling on line this can be ideal as there is software (not expensive) which will allow you to set up discounts and or cash back so if I introduce a customer and they spend 100 I get 5% or 5 from you, if they buy from you again I keep getting the cut if they intriduce someone they get the cut. No one gets a discount as I may not buy from you again especially if it is a one of purchase. These kick backs can work but only if set up corectly and legally.

I was thinking more a one time payment - one new customer = the one time discount. If they introduce a second customer then again it applies.

The other ongoing scheme is more like an affiliate programme???
wellington womble

We want to move towards a scheme where customers can submit one order every week and collect their box from the market - perhaps in their lunch break from work.

Brilliant. I always try to shop at farmers markets, but can't generally get to them. I also used to have a box scheme that did everything else as well where I could have a standing order and I miss it dreadfully. You just cannot beat stuff that just turns up. I frequently forget to order the beef that I can pick up by walking to end of lane (a few minutes walk even at toddler pace) despite an email reminder, but let a standing order run and run. What about a local milk round? You can't beat timer savers for busy people. And it's busy ones that have money. I'm still sure delivering to places of work is a good idea. Hospitals and big offices and the like.
welsh veg grower

Maybe another way is to let your existing customer base help - give them a discount for every new customer recommended who makes a purchase?.

if you are selling on line this can be ideal as there is software (not expensive) which will allow you to set up discounts and or cash back so if I introduce a customer and they spend 100 I get 5% or 5 from you, if they buy from you again I keep getting the cut if they intriduce someone they get the cut. No one gets a discount as I may not buy from you again especially if it is a one of purchase. These kick backs can work but only if set up corectly and legally.

I was thinking more a one time payment - one new customer = the one time discount. If they introduce a second customer then again it applies.

The other ongoing scheme is more like an affiliate programme???

well then you just need a discount code also a great idea. good luck
Nick

This may not be true for many small producers, but for many businesses, it's very true.

80% of your customers are AWAY customers. And 20% are TOWARDS customers. An AWAY customer buys from you, not because you're great, but because you're not the alternative. He doesn't want to go shoe shopping, but his current shoes are a bit leaky, worn out and untidy. He has to make a purchase, and it should be easy. A TOWARDS customer is waiting to hear about your great new line of shoes, about the soft soles, the shiny new technology in the laces, and all the other exciting features.

Almost all advertising and marketing people do is geared to TOWARDS customers; it lists features and benefits, and the flashing lights. Much more should be towards the AWAY customers, but it is much harder to define what they're after.

Early adopters are your classic towards customers, and you can see them outside the Apple store with every launch, if I haven't explained it very well. In fact, tho, 80% of iPod customers just wanted a reliable, solid MP3 player that gave them no grief. All the advertising is towards the towards customers, who would have bought the thing anyway.

So, doesn't matter if it's print, telesales, internet or whatever, think about the people you're trying to talk to. You're right, it's half science, half black magic.
Rob R

While I've been sat here reading this I've got an e-mail for a repeat order as a direct result of the magazine article. Smile

It's the only customer we've knowingly got from it but the article was free and the sales have easily paid for the time it took for the interview.
Nick

Drop him a bunch of vouchers for a fiver off the next 50 order, for him and his friends. See if you can track the purchases.

And let the magazine know, they may want to talk to you again about the power of their advertising.
Rob R

Drop him a bunch of vouchers for a fiver off the next 50 order, for him and his friends. See if you can track the purchases.

Done it. Smile

As I read it I thought you were going to say a bunch of flowers...
Went

Drop him a bunch of vouchers for a fiver off the next 50 order, for him and his friends. See if you can track the purchases.

Done it. Smile

As I read it I thought you were going to say a bunch of flowers...

Great idea especially if you can track the vouchers.
Smile
Frazzled_Barbie

Not even cash for that at the moment, we're on very short funds until the warmer weather brings the seasonal stallholders Sad. We do leaflet sometimes and people seem to appreciate it.

We need *new* customers, too, though, rather than the established pool, which means pavement pounding, I think.

I have a good twitter following but I need to get it to drive more traffic to the fb page - I can use that for special offers etc.. I probably need to start a new thread for this rather than hijack this one.

I think you are right in your original premise, anyway - whether you are using high or low tech marketing, it doesn't matter a damn if you are targeting the wrong group or, indeed, not targeting anyone and just being wishy washy. And as a small business you need to balance time as one of your marketing inputs as well as cash.

What about your local radio show - a quick inteview about community spirit, buying local, use it or lose it kind of thing???
sean

Local papers are desperate for ready-made stories too. We made the front page of the NDJ for thinking about doing something. Went

Not even cash for that at the moment, we're on very short funds until the warmer weather brings the seasonal stallholders Sad. We do leaflet sometimes and people seem to appreciate it.

We need *new* customers, too, though, rather than the established pool, which means pavement pounding, I think.

I have a good twitter following but I need to get it to drive more traffic to the fb page - I can use that for special offers etc.. I probably need to start a new thread for this rather than hijack this one.

I think you are right in your original premise, anyway - whether you are using high or low tech marketing, it doesn't matter a damn if you are targeting the wrong group or, indeed, not targeting anyone and just being wishy washy. And as a small business you need to balance time as one of your marketing inputs as well as cash.

What about your local radio show - a quick inteview about community spirit, buying local, use it or lose it kind of thing???

I have not seen your FB page so not sure what you are offering on there - why do you want traffic to FB -?

Are the offers tweeted?
Jamanda

Which FB page Chez? I know we're not in your catchment area, but we can swap links. Chez

http://mineheadfarmersmarket.co.uk/

Link to FB page on the front page.

I am desperately trying not to end up with ALL the responsibility for emarketing, so I am trying to gently get a few other people to do some. They can just about cope with the idea of updating the fb page. The idea of doing anything with the website will cause a heart-attack.

Anything posted on the FB page as a status is tweeted automatically.
Jamanda

I can see a "follow me on Twitter" box, but not a FB one. Chez

How strange. Can anyone else see it? 12Bore

Just the huge one immediately above the twitter one... Chez

Hmm. Good.

Jamanda ... are you *sure* you can't see that? It's about three inches square.
Jamanda

Hang on. done a screen capture but it's an PNG - need to do stuff to it. Jamanda

Chez

Has someone installed an ad-blocker on your machine? Embarassed Jamanda

It doesn't seem to be my ad blocker. I disabled it on your site, to no avail. I did find your fb page by searching on fb, but not the point.

It's there on BW's machine.
Went

FB link displaying OK here on chrome. Jamanda

OK here in IE - just not Firefox. how odd. Chez

How strange. It must be something in your browser, Jamanda - but if it's happening with you it might be happening elsewhere. Perhaps I'll stick a simple button right at the bottom, to give people another option.

WVG - thank you for the like Smile
welsh veg grower



WVG - thank you for the like Smile

your welcome
alison

I can see it on ff. Chez

I think she might be using an old version of the browser. Rolling Eyes

Thank you for the likes, everyone. I seem to have thread-hijacked very successfully Embarassed
Went

I think she might be using an old version of the browser. Rolling Eyes

Thank you for the likes, everyone. I seem to have thread-hijacked very successfully Embarassed

Not high-jacked at all, learning through case example is the best way.

It helps to revisit these issues every so often otherwise we become complacent.

Sometimes it is all too easy to let technology do the thinking for us.
Rob R

80% of your customers are AWAY customers. And 20% are TOWARDS customers. An AWAY customer buys from you, not because you're great, but because you're not the alternative. He doesn't want to go shoe shopping, but his current shoes are a bit leaky, worn out and untidy. He has to make a purchase, and it should be easy. A TOWARDS customer is waiting to hear about your great new line of shoes, about the soft soles, the shiny new technology in the laces, and all the other exciting features.

Almost all advertising and marketing people do is geared to TOWARDS customers; it lists features and benefits, and the flashing lights. Much more should be towards the AWAY customers, but it is much harder to define what they're after.


I guess my towards customers are the health concious people who buy our beef because it is grass fed and extra healthy, whereas the away customers are the ones who need some beef as their freezer is empty...
Went

So how do we keep and grow our away customers? High quality products, service and reliability are key, but what else?

If they are customers because of ease of access and habit, loyalty is soon replaced should the opportunity arise.
Jamanda

I think she might be using an old version of the browser. Rolling Eyes

Thank you for the likes, everyone. I seem to have thread-hijacked very successfully Embarassed

I am. All the techie people said they weren't updating until something or other happened. Do you mean it did and no-one told me?
Chez

I think you just have to make sure that you keep it easy for them. And that you work on their perceptions.

For example, looking at my poll, the second most off-putting thing about the market is it's perceived expense. Yes, some things we sell are more expensive. But, again, for example, my eggs are 20p per BOX lower than the average price-point for free-range supermarket eggs.

I think, picking out one or two things that the 'away' people can hook in to and get their heads round might turn them in to 'towards' customers.
Chez

I am. All the techie people said they weren't updating until something or other happened. Do you mean it did and no-one told me?

*sigh*

Bring it at the weekend. With the other one. Laughing
Jamanda


But, again, for example, my eggs are 20p per BOX lower than the average price-point for free-range supermarket eggs.


Do you have that on big letters on your signs?
Frazzled_Barbie

I think you just have to make sure that you keep it easy for them. And that you work on their perceptions.

For example, looking at my poll, the second most off-putting thing about the market is it's perceived expense. Yes, some things we sell are more expensive. But, again, for example, my eggs are 20p per BOX lower than the average price-point for free-range supermarket eggs.

I think, picking out one or two things that the 'away' people can hook in to and get their heads round might turn them in to 'towards' customers.

Tesco's etc all have their price match label thingies...how about the markets do them too....maybe a bit tongue in cheek - get the punters talking?
Green Rosie

Re: Promoting your business

It strikes me that some small businesses are too reliant on web based services to promote their business at the expense of traditional methods of promotion such as trade shows, newspapers, magazines, direct customer contact etc etc...

Web-based promotion is great if you have the skills, abilities and vision to get it right, otherwise I feel it lets a lot of small businesses down.

I fully realise the advantages of web-based promotion but do you think we are losing out on potential business by ignoring (for the want of a better term) traditional marketing strategies?


All our advertising for the gite is done through the web. We then rely on offering a good service to get customer returns and recommendations. I'm not sure how else we could promote the gite but any ideas would be most welcome.
judith

Tesco's etc all have their price match label thingies...how about the markets do them too....maybe a bit tongue in cheek - get the punters talking?

My local farm shop does that. It is really quite effective.
Pel

For my advertising I have a website and I use the free ad paper, it goes through all the doors in the area and it costs 10 a month to advertise in there. I did decide to advertise for the first time in the local newspaper and so far I've had one enquiry, so won't be advertising there again cost me 55 for 3 weeks.
The free-ad paper and website, usually brings in enough clients on their own. Though now as I've been running a few years i'm getting clients through word of mouth... I seem to be popular with the dog breeders in my area, so i'm tempted to give a load of business cards to them to pass around.
I also get a couple a new clients from different forums I go on, but by far best way of advertising for me is website and free-ad paper.
I get a lot of positive comments about my website being very easy and simple to use Smile I like the comments more because the potential client has actually commented on it, rather than the actual words themselves.

Its a bit silly to have all your eggs in one basket.
boisdevie1

Re: Promoting your business

It strikes me that some small businesses are too reliant on web based services to promote their business at the expense of traditional methods of promotion such as trade shows, newspapers, magazines, direct customer contact etc etc...

Web-based promotion is great if you have the skills, abilities and vision to get it right, otherwise I feel it lets a lot of small businesses down.

I fully realise the advantages of web-based promotion but do you think we are losing out on potential business by ignoring (for the want of a better term) traditional marketing strategies?


All our advertising for the gite is done through the web. We then rely on offering a good service to get customer returns and recommendations. I'm not sure how else we could promote the gite but any ideas would be most welcome.

1. Do a deal with customers - if you get a booking through them then give them a bung.
2. Liaise with others gites in the area so that when they can't fulfill a booking because they're full they recommend you and vice versa. Did this in the BnB and it worked very well.
Green Rosie

Re: Promoting your business

It strikes me that some small businesses are too reliant on web based services to promote their business at the expense of traditional methods of promotion such as trade shows, newspapers, magazines, direct customer contact etc etc...

Web-based promotion is great if you have the skills, abilities and vision to get it right, otherwise I feel it lets a lot of small businesses down.

I fully realise the advantages of web-based promotion but do you think we are losing out on potential business by ignoring (for the want of a better term) traditional marketing strategies?


All our advertising for the gite is done through the web. We then rely on offering a good service to get customer returns and recommendations. I'm not sure how else we could promote the gite but any ideas would be most welcome.

1. Do a deal with customers - if you get a booking through them then give them a bung.
2. Liaise with others gites in the area so that when they can't fulfill a booking because they're full they recommend you and vice versa. Did this in the BnB and it worked very well.

Actually we do No 1 already! If existing clients get us another new booking we offer them a free end of let cleaning worth 35. They are generally very pleased not to have to clean at the end of their stay and we don't actually lose any money. We always re-clean the gite anyway, except on the rare occasions it is left absolutely immaculate.

No 2 would not really work as we show our availability calendar so people don't tend to contact us if the week they want is already booked. I know some gite owners don't show their availability but from a client's point of view I find that REALLY annoying, having to send out enquiry emails only to find the week you want is already booked. I don't generally want to be offered another place locally as usually it is the specific gite I am booking, not the locality (although I know that is not the case for everyone).
SandraR

Interesting post Smile Downsizer working at it's best. T.G

The one promotional tool that I have found works is the magnetic business cards you can get.

I have several stuck to the fridge and use them as fridge magnets, however on several occasions I have been able to give those particular details out to friends and other interested parties because I knew what was on them and I knew where they were.

I find traditional business cards, regardless of all good intentions, get mislaid or eventually binned. These have simply survived because they are useful, not for any other reason, they must have been satisfactory at a bare minimum or Id never have used the business and asked for a card.

Although, istr I may have kept one or two because they are merely magnetised and useful, having never used the business but had the number, such as the crane hire chappy.
Rob R

The one promotional tool that I have found works is the magnetic business cards you can get.

I have several stuck to the fridge and use them as fridge magnets, however on several occasions I have been able to give those particular details out to friends and other interested parties because I knew what was on them and I knew where they were.



Good idea! Smile
troyannick

Re gites and accommodation I saw and used a great thing driving through Germany in a place called Neumarket it was basically a big board with a street map, the details of accommodation were posted down the side with prices, so I just picked a couple and went and found them, great! The map was the most helpful as I dont speak German so phoning for directions was not really an option.So often if your on the move and accommodation is well signposted its a great marketing tool.I also personally really like prices advertised. Mistress Rose

Chez, I looked on your web link, and it looks good. Don't personally use Facebook or Twitter, so those are non-goers for me. I think your idea of boxes is excellent, as it means people can just pop in.

The Hampshire Farmers Markets are at weekends, which means that we can get people who work all week. This is probably not possible for you, but does make a difference.

We have found that local free journals as well as the internet, both our own pages and specialist web sites are best for things like logs, but going to farmers markets best for other things like charcoal. Word of mouth helps us a lot too as we have now got well established.

I am still looking for a good way of advertising fencing and other estate services, so any ideas gratefully received.
troyannick

Looks like all businesses need tailored promotion, very specific to the kind of clientel you are after, a younger market leaning towards all the high tech media tools, an older market maybe more traditional channels, or a mix.Some need to target passing trade others remote clients, interesting. Always maybe wise to research how the succesful businesses in your sector do it...Any free advertising is worth doing as and when you have the time.And of course change with the times which do change quickly. Dianeflower

I agree with troyannick. Both, traditional and online media are effective as long as you know the specifics of your target group. A competitor analysis is always a good starting point for every business plan.
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