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gz

Reducing the use of Plastics

In plural, as there are so many varieties.

Some are not made from oil. Are they just as bad?

How is everyone reducing their personal use of plastic?
Sometimes it can be necessary..but what did we do before plastic?

Please discuss Cool
gz

I'm changing over to glass or metal for storage . However you can't use these to freeze food.
I already use glass (or sometimes ceramic) in the microwave oven.
landfill rubbish goes straight to the bin without plastic bags..
jema

Reducing yes, making it a factor in buying decisions, wondering where the pressure points are? carrier bags got reduced massively so what is the next target?
wellington womble

Plastic bottles, I would think.

I made beeswrap a couple of weeks ago. I’m making some more in a week or two, I’ll try and remember to take pictures.
Fee

I think it'll be plastic bottles, since making a more conscious effort again, because it had slipped significantly since Willow came along, I've noticed how many plastic bottles make it into our lives.

One aree that has to be reversed is the shrink wrapping of individual fruit and veg, such as Swedes! That's fairly new, too. I mean, honestly, why on earth did somebody ever think an item such as a Swede needed to have shrink wrapping and where did that decision cone from? I wonder if it was cheaper than the thick label for the bar code that they used to use? Probably.

Our buying habits have changed, Arthur and I go round the supermarket and every item with plastic packaging gets discussed. It's the single use plastics, the film on stuff that can't be recycled. Anyway, we don't buy it if it has it unnecessarily. It means less variety in fruit and veg but so be it.

I appreciate that going round the supermarket is part of the problem, too, but at the present time in my life the supermarket is a necessary evil, I can't be going from shop to shop to get what I need. I've heard Nantwich has a pretty thriving market so we'll use that when we move, if it's right.

On a household level, it helps greatly having a 7yo who declares, "op, single use plastic!" at anything that comes in that has a film. He got really, really upset when he did his last big Lego kit because of all the individual bags inside, all single-use. He thought it meant he wasn't going to be able to have Lego any more and Lego is life to Arthur Smile

I have noticed as shift in people's attitude though, the "blue planet effect" is real. Previous to that episode my comments on plastic use in the fruit and veg aisles were ignored, people would look the other way but lately people are agreeing and entering into conversation about how unnecessary things are, which is great. I've also noticed many friends on Facebook, who I wouldn't have necessarily said were that interested before, talking about it, posting about it, joining in discussion about it. Which is all good if the momentum is kept up.
Mistress Rose

One thing I do is reuse any plastic bags as many times as I can. We used to use paper bags before plastic came in btw.

Agree about single use bottles. I always put them in recycling, but going back to glass with a deposit if necessary would be a good idea, if a lot heavier. I get my milk by the week, so that would be a nightmare, but would probably buy less more frequently in that case.

Wrapped veg annoys me too. I always wonder what they have to hide. I tend to get my veg at a farm shop or the local greengrocer, so it isn't wrapped and I can take my own bags for the things needed.

We are pushing our county charcoal which has always been packaged in paper bags, like potato sacks, as 'ahead of the game', and someone suggested that we should also push our household wooden items like spoons, spatulas, spirtles, etc. as an alternative to plastic. I am hoping to get round to making gipsy pegs this year too. They use recycled metal from tins and hazel, so no plastic. I know these are longer use plastics, but all help to use a bit less.
Nicky Colour it green

I buy my veg loose - the local shop stocks riverford veg and has paper bags if needed, or I buy in the market where they just pile it into my rucksack for me. Or I grow my own obviously.

But I don't think veg is the thing we should be targeting - take a look at the laundry aisle - you cant buy fabric conditioner that isn't in a plastic bottle with a big plastic dispenser.. kitchen cleaners have spray attachments you are supposed to throw away, and some detergents come in one use plastic boxes ffs... People are buying bamboo toothbrushes, but the toothpaste comes in plastic tubes...

Then sugar - white sugar comes in paper, so why does brown sugar come in plastic?

Also I think we have to be careful that plastic is not the only thing we consider - you can buy toilet roll that is not wrapped in plastic.. but it is manufactured in and shipped from China, and although it is recycled paper.. each one is individually wrapped in groovy new paper.... so folks coming to your house can see how eco you are...and they are pretty.... it's a clever marketing campaign.

The problem of plastic should not be considered in isolation - recycling food cans and glass uses a lot of energy, paper production has a high carbon footprint. A lot of fruit and veg is plastic wrapped to help it keep - and if people insist on buying out of season fruit, it has to come from far away, and it will need help to keep.

so like I say, I buy veg loose, I dont use bin liners, I am looking into making my own kitchen cleaning solutions to reuse the spray bottles, I try and make balanced decisions about my purchases...
gz

Fruit can be barcoded, with veg based food-friendly inks..istr this has started last year,we saw it in NZ. One way to get round those sticky plastic labels. Our local Sainsbugs has started reducing individual fruit,not just that wrapped in plastic.
Fee

I noticed that with Sainsbury's, too, gz, we've started using Morrison's who do have a little more choice of single fruit and veg .

Also, they have agreed that I can take my own container to put neat in instead of taking plastic bags and plastic wrap from the meat counter!
sgt.colon


Then sugar - white sugar comes in paper, so why does brown sugar come in plastic?


I suspect it's because it's more sticky, so would stick to a paper bag. That's only a guess though.
gz

Oil in glass bottles or larger tins is slowly increasing..you can understand the higher price due to heavier goods, but it isn't too much difference.
Not easy when you need to economize Confused
Jam Lady

Brown sugar will dry out and get very hard if it is kept in paper.

I look at information on paper and plastic packaging to see how much post-consumer waste was used to manufacture it. Plus, keep in mind that Patagonia turns recycled polyester largely from repurposed PET bottle into fiber for their clothing. And I love their jackets and vests (American outdoor clothing vests, not what you in the UK call vests which we would call underwear.)

Labels on apples and pears are quickly slapped on with a labeling device as the box is opened and fruit unpacked. Printing labels directly onto the fruit would be more complicated. What about bananas? Rutabagas are wax coated, not shrink wrapped.

We tend to shred paper that does not go into the paper recycle bin for every other week pickup. What gets shredded gets tossed it in the compost heap. Envelopes with those little clear windows are my bête noire. Unless I take the time to rip out the glassine window it too gets shredded and lives on forever in compost / garden.
Mistress Rose

I agree we need to look at the overall footprint what we are buying. I don't see the point of shipping things across the world so we can have them out of season, although I will admit to buying apples from New Zealand and Australia out of season. The British season is a lot longer now though; our farm shop has just run out of British apples and sometimes they go on until April.

This is something we push with out products; they are local made and by buying them you are helping the management of a local woodland. Sadly, too many people see the price and are put off because they think they can buy the 'same' thing in a supermarket, only it is imported and machine made. In some cases I realise that the hand made product isn't affordable to everyone, but in some cases people are so used to paying low prices for imported rubbish that they don't know what doing the job properly costs. One reason we have lost manufacturing jobs in the UK.

On the same lines, we rescued some things someone moving out of son's block of flats threw, incorrectly, into the recycling bin. Took most to food bank, but kept the kitchen utensils. They are useful but either made of very flimsy plastic or very poor quality wood. One spoon is a useful shape, and I may use it for a template, but feels horrid compared to the spoon I made specifically for myself for scrambled egg.
gz

JL I'd thought that the windows in envelopes were now recyclable? cellophane from wood?
buzzy

Brown sugar will dry out and get very hard if it is kept in paper.

..............................................................


Maybe so, but I remember buying brown sugar and watching the shop assistant weigh it out and pack it in a blue paper bag, and fold and seal the top ever so neatly. How did we manage then?

Henry
Jam Lady

Buzzy, the sugar would have hardened and then been grated when wanted.

buzzy

Not in our house. I do not remember the brown sugar ever going hard enough to need grating. I think, but am not certain, that we put the sugar in a airtight tin once we got home.

Henry
Nicky Colour it green

JL I'd thought that the windows in envelopes were now recyclable? cellophane from wood?

we have been asked to put window envelopes in the paper recycling for years now, in my area. No idea how they process them though.
Mistress Rose

You could store it in an airtight tin. You can also bring it back by putting in a bowl with a damp tea towel over it.

It is possible to make some plastics from renewable resources, but whether they do or not I have no idea.
Nicky Colour it green


It is possible to make some plastics from renewable resources, but whether they do or not I have no idea.

there is a recycled toilet paper you can buy that comes in a biodegradable plasticy wrapper that is make from corn. I just have to question if we should be growing crops to make bog roll wrappers....
buzzy


It is possible to make some plastics from renewable resources, but whether they do or not I have no idea.

there is a recycled toilet paper you can buy that comes in a biodegradable plasticy wrapper that is make from corn. I just have to question if we should be growing crops to make bog roll wrappers....

Depends partly on which part of the corn plant is used. If it's the leaves and stalks, that's good. If it's the corn grain itself, that's shakier ground. Perhaps the low quality grains that won't be sold for food are used?

A recent parcel was packed with what appeared to be polystyrene 'worms' but the information inside the package said they were made from corn and could be composted. I put one in water and it dissolved rapidly.

Henry
Slim


A recent parcel was packed with what appeared to be polystyrene 'worms' but the information inside the package said they were made from corn and could be composted. I put one in water and it dissolved rapidly.

Henry

You can touch those to your tongue, and then stick them together. It's great fun to build with.
Fee


A recent parcel was packed with what appeared to be polystyrene 'worms' but the information inside the package said they were made from corn and could be composted. I put one in water and it dissolved rapidly.

Henry

You can touch those to your tongue, and then stick them together. It's great fun to build with.

Oooh, that does sound like fun!
buzzy


A recent parcel was packed with what appeared to be polystyrene 'worms' but the information inside the package said they were made from corn and could be composted. I put one in water and it dissolved rapidly.

Henry

You can touch those to your tongue, and then stick them together. It's great fun to build with.

Oooh, that does sound like fun!

If you'd like a boxfull, pm me your mailing address and I'll send you some!

Henry
wellington womble

Packaging materials are some of our main 'toys' here. Parcels are eagerly awaiting! Mistress Rose

Have just checked and it is made of cornstarch, not the leaves or stems. If you get this, compost it by making sure it has light and moisture otherwise it won't decompose quickly according to the web site I found.

Natural packing materials have advantages, but can also cause a biosecurity risk. Wood based materials such as shavings have to conform to various standards to be permissible, and in places like Australia, they may be banned completely, so as well to check. A nasty pest was introduced into the UK via some non-permissible wood packing. The result was that the Forestry Commission cut all affected trees within several hundred metres of the infestation and incinerated them in special containers. The area was then monitored for several years, and I am glad to say it was then declared free. It is worrying that things like emerald ash borer could get into the UK that way, among others.
Hairyloon

Re: Reducing the use of Plastics

Some are not made from oil. Are they just as bad?
Only because I have taken an interest in 3d printing, I have discovered Poly Lactic Acid (PLA).
This is made of natural material and biodegrades. I don't know how fast it degrades: not too fast I think, but I'm told it does break down in the environment.
Otherwise it seems just like typical plastic: I'm puzzled why it is not more widely used.
gz

https://www.tinyplantcompany.co.uk/

A garden company going plastic free
Fee


A recent parcel was packed with what appeared to be polystyrene 'worms' but the information inside the package said they were made from corn and could be composted. I put one in water and it dissolved rapidly.

Henry

You can touch those to your tongue, and then stick them together. It's great fun to build with.

Oooh, that does sound like fun!

If you'd like a boxfull, pm me your mailing address and I'll send you some!

Henry

I think HT might throttle me if I said yes just now, given we're reducing as much as we can for moving house Smile

But thank you Smile
Slim

But they're also for packaging items for moving house!

I don't think you can say no.
Mistress Rose

Good idea to have non-plastic packaging for the plant company. We are trying to think of ways of cutting out plastic in our company, but it isn't easy. We currently sell logs in plastic net bags; a requirement is that the customer can see what they are buying, and with a plastic laminated label as they are sometimes stored outside. We are thinking of a re-useable plastic baby dumpy bag, but that is going to be complicated with deposits paid to our outlets, but we will offer it to some of them next winter. Still plastic, but not as bad. gz

Can you get non-plastic net bags? buzzy

Can you get non-plastic net bags?

Sounds like a challenge to all the weavers on the forum Laughing

Henry
Fee

I seem to remember Jamsam making some! Fee

Like these net shopping bags? https://weefolkart.com/market-bag-patterns-crochet-knit-sew/ Fee

But they're also for packaging items for moving house!

I don't think you can say no.

Laughing Gimme 4 weeks and I'd love a box!
gz

Like these net shopping bags? https://weefolkart.com/market-bag-patterns-crochet-knit-sew/

good, but possibly not suitable/economic for kindling?
Bebo

To avoid using chuck away plastic spoons / forks, I carry a titanium spork around in the backpack I use for work.

The next target should be plastic straws. No need to find a replacement, just drink without using a straw.
Slim

To avoid using chuck away plastic spoons / forks, I carry a titanium spork around in the backpack I use for work.

The next target should be plastic straws. No need to find a replacement, just drink without using a straw.

Some folks can't drink easily without a straw. But there are metal straws that can be purchased, same as your metal spork.
Bebo


Some folks can't drink easily without a straw. But there are metal straws that can be purchased, same as your metal spork.

True, but they are few and far between. My uncle has Parkinson's and is one of them (his hands shake to much for him to pick up a glass or cup without chucking the contents of it in his face).

I seem to recall most straws were waxed paper when I was a kid. Why not go back to those.
buzzy

One can still buy waxed paper straws.

Henry
Nicky Colour it green

riverford write about their efforts to reduce plastic, making some interesting points, like some foods need extra protection, and most biodegradable plastic won't biodegrade in the ocean, or sometimes not in the home compost heap wellington womble


Some folks can't drink easily without a straw. But there are metal straws that can be purchased, same as your metal spork.

True, but they are few and far between. My uncle has Parkinson's and is one of them (his hands shake to much for him to pick up a glass or cup without chucking the contents of it in his face).

I seem to recall most straws were waxed paper when I was a kid. Why not go back to those.

I nearly always use a straw. I have insanely sensitive teeth, and I can’t drink anything hot or cold without one. I carry a metal water bottle with an integrated silicone straw and use silicone straws at home. I try to carry a silicone straw with me, but inevitably there are times when I have forgotten to put it back in my bag after washing. Then I use plastic.
wellington womble

This is not a defence of single use plastic, and I’m definitely on board with reducing single use plastic as far as possible. But why is it such an issue?

I was thinking it’s a finite, oil intensive resource, but surely that applies to metal as well? But then I thought metal is recyclable, but so is plastic, isn’t it? Why is single use plastic any worse than single use metal? (food or drinks cans, for example). Is it because it’s not so economic to recycling it, and its more likely to get dumped? I know soft plastics are less recyclable, and many schemes don’t take them, so is the issue that the infrastructure isn’t there to recycle them? Or that it’s not economical? If so, could these also be tackled as well?

Like I said, I am absolutely in favour and actively trying to reduce plastic consumption in our house. I just find myself wondering why it’s more of an issue than any other finite resource, and if so, are there lessons that would be helpful as to why they aren’t such big issues. Or are they, and we’re just not hearing about it? So are the oceans/rainforests/sensitive dessert environments also full of dangerous metal rubbish, but it wasn’t on Blue Planet?
Shane


Some folks can't drink easily without a straw. But there are metal straws that can be purchased, same as your metal spork.

True, but they are few and far between. My uncle has Parkinson's and is one of them (his hands shake to much for him to pick up a glass or cup without chucking the contents of it in his face).

I seem to recall most straws were waxed paper when I was a kid. Why not go back to those.

I nearly always use a straw. I have insanely sensitive teeth, and I can’t drink anything hot or cold without one. I carry a metal water bottle with an integrated silicone straw and use silicone straws at home. I try to carry a silicone straw with me, but inevitably there are times when I have forgotten to put it back in my bag after washing. Then I use plastic.
I'm seeing more and more of these popping up at eco-minded food outlets
Mistress Rose

Before plastic straws paper straws were common and you had to take great care not to suck too hard, or chew the end, otherwise they closed up on you. Rather difficult for children, and I was a child at the time.

'Plastic' is a generic name for a whole range of materials, all with different properties and recycling issues. I am not an expert, but I don't know why thermoplastics can't be recycled by melting down and reforming, although no doubt the quality would deteriorate on each melting, and any additives would affect it too. Others are not so easy to recycle, and composites are a nightmare.
gz

The problem with recycling plastic I think is that there are so many different types.
Some local authorities only collect a very limited range for recycling, although it is improving.

Have you noticed that some shops seem to be moving away from the bags that can be recycled with carrier bags for vegetable/fruit wrapping ?
derbyshiredowser

Before plastic straws paper straws were common and you had to take great care not to suck too hard, or chew the end, otherwise they closed up on you. Rather difficult for children, and I was a child at the time.

'Plastic' is a generic name for a whole range of materials, all with different properties and recycling issues. I am not an expert, but I don't know why thermoplastics can't be recycled by melting down and reforming, although no doubt the quality would deteriorate on each melting, and any additives would affect it too. Others are not so easy to recycle, and composites are a nightmare.

On the BBC film about plastic recycling in Norway they said they can recycle and reuse the plastic scrap 12 times which made me wonder how given its granulated and reformed how do they know its number of uses?.
sgt.colon

I heard this morning that deposits on plastic bottles and also on cans is being introduced later on in the year to encourage more recycling. Jam Lady

Trash collection. We pay for once a week garbage collection. Every other week the trash company collects recyclables, no additional charge. They pick up metal cans, glass, bundled corrugated cardboard (must be tied up), newspaper (must be tied up) paper (junk mail, office paper, etc). AND plastics, number 1 through 7.

Grocery stores / supermarkets collect plastic carrier bags for recycling. Not the somewhat flimsy bags for produce. But they do accept the plastic carrier bags from any store, not just the ones at the collection point.
Mistress Rose

We pay for rubbish collection as part of our council tax, so we get alternate weeks recycling and rubbish. Glass collection separately once every 4 weeks. They will take plastics 1-3, but why they won't take some of the others I really don't know, as I would have through HDPE would be ideal for recycling, and I think that is a higher number. Slim

Not plastics, but related to hauling and curbside pickup, a lot of areas are starting to mandate food scraps hauling, and further separating waste streams.

Here's the timeline for the entire state of Vermont https://cswd.net/wp-content/uploads/Act-148-UR_Timeline_Summary-AMENDED-2017.jpg
gz

They've just changed our collection..we have three boxes on one trolley, paper, plastic and metal, and glass. Once a week. There is also a food waste lidded bucket, but we just compost.
Landfill is once every 3 weeks and its good to see them actually calling it that.
Green waste is every four weeks, apart from the winter..no collection. There is talk that the green waste could be charged for soon.
Mistress Rose

What do they do with the food waste and what do they call food waste? Everything raw goes on our compost heap, and I try to only cook what we need, but things like bones and odd bits have to go in the bin. In England, probably the whole of UK, food that has been in a kitchen is not permitted to be fed to pigs. gz

THEY call food waste anything from the kitchen, and its treated at high temperatures.
What I call food waste is anything cooked. Not much of that spare around here Laughing
Slim

Similar here. Labels get used somewhat interchangeably and may not be well defined by many.

The state law here is designed to divert "organics" from the waste stream. That stuff is all supposed to go to dedicated composting facilities now (or to a biomass power plant for woody stuff). Anything easily biodegradable is theoretically meant to be diverted: food scraps, meat, bones, paper towels, paper coffee filters, coffee grounds, etc....

I don't know how realistically the above will be diverted until the next generation really takes hold, as I think it will take some persuading to get people to stop throwing things into the trash the way they always have.

And there are a large number of people who have space to compost in a pile in their backyard that do.
Mistress Rose

I think only our 'garden waste' goes to the composting facility, but we don't use it as we run our own compost heaps. Other stuff goes mainly to the incinerator I think. It produces electricity, so not all bad, but could be better. Hairyloon

I was thinking it’s a finite, oil intensive resource, but surely that applies to metal as well? But then I thought metal is recyclable, but so is plastic, isn’t it? Why is single use plastic any worse than single use metal?

Because when single use metal gets into the ocean it sinks and/or corrodes into natural earth minerals.
Plastic floats about until it is eaten, where it tends to make things die.
Stick "Plastic whale" into your preferred search engine and reach for the anti-depressants.
Mistress Rose

Metal is a finite resource in one way, but it is easier to recycle than plastic, and even if it is all put in landfill it is easier to get out again and reuse, even if at present that isn't economic. Overall it is probably better to have reuseable things to keep food in, but tins have their uses and can store food for a very long time. Hairyloon

I'm not convinced that landfill isn't a better place for plastic than burning it. There will come a day when they'll want to dig it up again and reuse it. Mistress Rose

I agree that burning is a waste, but it is a way of getting rid of it so it is really got rid of. I don't think being in landfill for several decades will make it easy to recycle though. The first problem is always sorting the various types, removing additives such as colour, additional things to modify the properties etc., which I think must be pretty difficult if not impossible with fresh stuff, let alone stuff that has been in the ground. gz

https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/local-news/wishaw-dairy-sees-surge-glass-11984295 Mistress Rose

There doesn't seem to be much point in plastic bottles if you have milk delivered daily. It is good to see that glass bottles are being used though. buzzy

Our milkman occasionally delivers a plastic milk container, usually with an apologetic note saying they have run out of bottles. I think, but am not certain, that you can request plastic rather than glass.

Henry
gz

http://www.stroudnewsandjournal.co.uk/news/16146628.Plastic_free_shop_opens_in_Stroud/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=SocialSignIn

Any other shops we know doing this?
Hairyloon

I don't think being in landfill for several decades will make it easy to recycle though...
It will give it decades of technological improvements to the recycling facilities...
Mistress Rose

That looks interesting Gz. I take my own plastic bags with me and reuse them at the farm shop. They know I am mad anyway, so it doesn't matter. Very Happy I don't buy fruit and veg at the supermarket except for bananas, and I never put them in a bag. If there is a paper bag, I prefer to use that.

Son told me yesterday that our county doesn't do landfill any more; all the non-recyclable waste goes to the incinerator that produces power from the burning. It is better than the first one we had here which produced rather bad pollution. I worked near it and we had to keep silver carefully wrapped or it went black in days.
gz

Just heard in conversation with a friend that Skipton (I think) is landfilling plastic..she missed her plastic collection, took it to the local recycling centre. There was no plastic recycling point there and she was told it all goes to landfill as they can no longer export it to China. sgt.colon

Not sure if anyone saw the one show last night but apparently they have an enzyme now that eats plastic. Should help with the recycling process. dpack

lab scale, only pet iirc but it is a start in enzyme tech.

a big downside is that pet is one of the easiest to recycle with no chemistry involved.

most can be recycled or repurposed if and it is a big if is is sorted into specific types each of which need different methods. any mixed plastic or muck contamination makes recyc uneconomic

china got fed up of being used as a dump rather than being supplied with well graded feedstock for reuse

the world market for recycled paper fibres is very strong so at least that part of the recyc system is doing ok at the mo.
Mistress Rose

The only downside with that is that the trees which were planted for pulping can no longer be used for that. Luckily the beech trees we have that were planted for pulp are doing well for firewood. This is the problem with long term crops; our oak trees are no longer wanted for ships, and really only for shingles for houses unless we have a very good one for timber framing. Luckily we know people who make shingles and do timber framing. Very Happy jema

It really struck me a few days ago looking round a quid shop type place, that not only was everything plastic, but that 80% of it was for products like disposable razors and other shite that 50 years ago people would not have used, and which are in fact worse than non disposable alternatives. Mistress Rose

We have certainly developed as a throw away society, but plastic products do allow us to do things we couldn't 50 years ago. We did have some plastic; my mother had some bakelite clothes pegs I remember, but we used paper bags in shops, all bottles were glass, and mainly deposit on the bottle. Things like razors were made of metal and pencil cases for instance, of wood. gz

There is a fb page,Using Less Plastic.....the more the merrier, spread the word!

Seems to have been going for at least three years
Nicky Colour it green

Brown sugar will dry out and get very hard if it is kept in paper.

..............................................................

Maybe so, but I remember buying brown sugar and watching the shop assistant weigh it out and pack it in a blue paper bag, and fold and seal the top ever so neatly. How did we manage then?

Henry

brown sugar is offered in paper tubes in coffee shops - it seems to survive perfectly well then - don't see why it wouldn't work on a larger scale
Mistress Rose

Perhaps we need to be aware of how to store things. I know that to soften brown sugar you have to put it in a bowl and put a damp teatowel over it, so our parents/grandparents would have probably kept the brown sugar in a glass jar or covered pot and softened it when it got hard. I don't remember my mother using it particularly as she used mainly white sugar, which goes solid when wet. Remember many 2lb sugar cubes from camp. Very Happy sgt.colon

Well you learn something new everyday. Never knew that about brown sugar MR. gz

We had presents well wrapped in pretty paper..unfortunately pretty paper has a lot of plastic on it Confused
Most were so well taped I can't re-use it either..so congratulations to those who wrapped in papery paper,or in gift bags Smile
Nicky Colour it green

We had presents well wrapped in pretty paper..unfortunately pretty paper has a lot of plastic on it Confused
Most were so well taped I can't re-use it either..so congratulations to those who wrapped in papery paper,or in gift bags Smile

I'm slowly building a collection of cloth bags made from my scrap cloth stash, to wrap presents in. Mostly for my son at Christmas. They look really nice, all tied in ribbon, and are reusable.
gz

brilliant idea Mistress Rose

My mother taught me how to wrap a present using very little sticky tape. She always said it was expensive so don't waste it, but of course it does make the wrapping reusable too if it isn't covered in tape.
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