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Penny Outskirts

Replacement strip light

I want to replace the strip light in our kitchen with something a bit prettier to look at - I really hate it with a passion Mad

I'd like a spot strip, but I don't want to have those electric guzzling spotlight track thingies. It does need to give quite a good light, the kitchen is small, and not particularly bright. Oh and I can't afford to pay a fortune for it.

Don't want much do I Embarassed

So has anyone managed to find a nice, quite bright, light or spotlights, which take energy saving bulbs and doesn't cost a fortune? I've not had much luck googling it - but perhaps I'm just not using the right search terms?
jema

Dunno what you want, but I want your old strip light Very Happy
Penny Outskirts

jema wrote:
Dunno what you want, but I want your old strip light Very Happy


You're very very welcome to it - why would you want it though Shocked
Treacodactyl

Re: Replacement strip light

Penny wrote:
I'd like a spot strip


Saucy girl. Wink

Back to the lights, I'd also be interested in peoples comments as I would like to replace the single kitchen light but I would like to avoid trendy downlighters.
AnneandMike

I think I've got the answer. I had two banks of halogen spotlights in mine (8 x 50 Watt!!!). Very nice but not particularly bright and bloody stupid waste of energy. I went to B & Q and after passing the endless ranks of similar stupid lights I found two 18 Watt low energy lamps with smart plastic round covers that look better and are brighter. they were not very expensive - about £25 each, I think. Idea Idea
Penny Outskirts

Re: Replacement strip light

Treacodactyl wrote:
Penny wrote:
I'd like a spot strip


Saucy girl. Wink

Back to the lights, I'd also be interested in peoples comments as I would like to replace the single kitchen light but I would like to avoid trendy downlighters.


Embarassed I really should read what I type! We can't do downlighters either, as Steve refuses to do battle with the creatures living between the floors in our house Shocked

And what the bloody hell is going on at Anfield where Arsenal youth team are currently 0-1 up Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Pass the bottle someone!

Oh and God scores!!!!!!!!!! wav

Get in there!!!!!!!!!!
tahir

Talke a look around www.lyco.co.uk they have surface mount spots that can take low energy GU10s I believe. Although strip's are much more efficient...
jema

Penny wrote:
jema wrote:
Dunno what you want, but I want your old strip light Very Happy


You're very very welcome to it - why would you want it though Shocked


The one in our little utility room is not very well.
dougal

Re: Replacement strip light

Penny wrote:
I want to replace the strip light in our kitchen with something a bit prettier to look at - I really hate it with a passion Mad

I'd like a spot strip, but I don't want to have those electric guzzling spotlight track thingies. ...


OK. I loath the light quality that comes from ordinary striplight tubes.

The aesthetics of the fitting are one thing.
The aesthetics of the light affect the entire atmosphere of everything in the room.

However such striplight fittings produce their light using much less power than ordinary bulbs.

Part of the answer - and fairly cheap - is to use a better tube!
There exist a variety of tubes that will fit the standard fitting, but give a nicer light. A "tri-phosphor" tube should make a big difference and not cost much. http://www.commercial-lamps.co.uk/acatalog/Fluorescent_tubes.html
But there are "full spectrum daylight" tubes too.
Its just a matter of tracking down a local-ish specialist.

You may also be able to improve things with a diffuser.
Part of the problem with the light is its flatness - the absence of shadows is excellent illumination, but poor on interest and atmosphere. Bouncing the light so it has some directionality might help.
You might be able to make something to hide the tube, and bounce the light back towards and off the ceiling. Colouring the reflecting surfaces will give you more light colour control. I'm thinking of a reflector hanging below the tube, hiding it. And then using the tube for general lighting. But add a couple of small halogen spots, (maybe mounted on your reflector/shade/pendant?), shining on food prep area and cooker hob, and you have a designer lighting solution!
MarkS

What about those LED downlighters? Are they any good ?

I am also interested - most of our bulbs are low energy apart from in the kitchen and bathroom where there are halogen lights. I dont want to tear the fittings out but I had wondered about just replacing the halogen bulbs with led ones and putting a suitable driver unit in.

they are a bit expensive though if they are not bright enough.
jema

We went for LEDS and they were dismal in every conceivable way, expensive, no light produced, and lasted 5 minutes.
Northern_Lad

jema wrote:
We went for LEDS and they were dismal in every conceivable way, expensive, no light produced, and lasted 5 minutes.


Don't know about the expense part, but I'd agree with the amount of light. My parents seam to be lasting though; mind you, with only 2W going through a line about 50cm long I wouldn't expect them to go too soon.

You can get downlighters that work through a transformer (robots in disguise!). I've got a set in the bathroom: 5 lights running a total of 50W. Plenty bright enough for most tasks, and you can angle each one individually. They mount on a wire so you don't need to go into the domain of the weevils. Nip along to your friendly Swedish home-fitter for a range of them.
tahir

jema wrote:
We went for LEDS and they were dismal in every conceivable way, expensive, no light produced, and lasted 5 minutes.


Ditto, although ours hadn't blown in the 6 months before we moved
Welsh Girls Allotment

I like the sound of the daylight imitation bulbs, they are obviously expensive but they would be an ideal solution for me as our kitchen gets very little natural light and I always struggle through the winter, I think I will try and find a local stockist , thank you for the link dougal
MarkS

tahir wrote:
jema wrote:
We went for LEDS and they were dismal in every conceivable way, expensive, no light produced, and lasted 5 minutes.


Ditto, although ours hadn't blown in the 6 months before we moved


OK, hit that idea on the head then.
tahir

They've got GU10 downlighters with fluorescent elements at Lyco, not cheap but should last longer than LED or halogen.
MarkS

I would have to change the fittings though, wouldnt I? In the kitchen that would mean repainting some of the beams if the fittings are not exactly the same size.
tahir

What fittings have you currently got?
James

Sorry I didnít see these last two posts before I wrote my replyÖ.



Iím going to be replacing my kitchen lighting in the near future and have worked out the (hopefullyÖ.) perfect answer.

A recent development is economy light bulbs that fit into small spot light fittings.

I intend to use either GU10 or an E27 (Edison screw fitting) spot light clusters, and buy economy spots from one of these companies (Iíve bought from both companies previously and both are good)

http://www.bltdirect.com/

http://www.lamps2udirect.com

The result will be two ceiling mounted clusters, each with three angled spot lights, just like the traditional kitchen spots, but using energy efficient spot lights.

The economy spots are slightly larger than the halogen or tungsten equivalent (so be careful with the size of fittings) and cost more, but they run cold and last for ages.

At present, Iím running economy 7 watt GU10 spot lights in the loft conversion. in comparison to the golden-white of traditional halogen spots, the spectrum is slightly purple-blue. But the angled lighting is just fantastic- light were you need it. The room is now tastefully lit for 28 watts (4 x 7 watt) , instead of 140 watts (4 x 35 watt).
MarkS

tahir wrote:
What fittings have you currently got?


GU5.3 (I think) about 5cm across, two small pins at the back (although I would happily replace the transformer and wiring if needed. The bulbs are just held in with a clip at the front so anything which isnt the same shape would be a problem.
dougal

Transformer...
The GU10's (for which fluorescent low wattage bulbs are available) are mains voltage halogens, the ones with a reputation for popping if they don't like your switch - hence making it sensible to put them on a twist-to-off dimmer (which ain't a good idea for fluorescents!)
jema

Dimmers make all the difference with GU10, I hated the damn things until I fitted dimmers.
Penny Outskirts

We have to do something that doesn't have a transformer thingy, so do GU10's need one?

Oh and bad news on the old one Jema, we have to keep it, in case the landlord wants to put it back in Sad Sorry pet....
tahir

Penny wrote:
We have to do something that doesn't have a transformer thingy, so do GU10's need one?


No
jema

Penny wrote:
We have to do something that doesn't have a transformer thingy, so do GU10's need one?

Oh and bad news on the old one Jema, we have to keep it, in case the landlord wants to put it back in Sad Sorry pet....


I'm sure one will crop up on freecycle. What with the Car and Boiler and Snowball giving up work, we are trying to be careful. Though we are going to get our hob and kitchen vent done when the boiler gets replaced as they make sense to get done at the same time.
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