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Nick

Replacement windows.

Anyone had any windows put in recently? I'm potentially going to get 5 windows, front and back doors replaced, and I wanted any rough costs, please? Double glazed units, various sizes, but none huge.

Just trying to get a rough idea for a property we may be looking to buy, hence the lack of measurements, etc.

So. Whaddya know? Smile
Jonnyboy

200 per window as a rough guess springs to mind. I might be way off though.
alison

Plastic or wood?
tahir

One of our new members is from:

www.greenbuildingstore.co.uk

Not the cheapest but certainly some of the most efficient double glazing.
Nick

alison wrote:
Plastic or wood?


Much as Gervase will kill me, actually I don't have much of a preference yet. I'm open to education, however.
alison

I would think more like 300. We bought an end of line, for an outside area, recently, that was in desperate need of replacing. It should have been 300, but we got it for 100. It was 4' x 2'
dougal

Nick Howe wrote:
alison wrote:
Plastic or wood?

Much as Gervase will kill me, actually I don't have much of a preference yet. I'm open to education, however.

I don't think that there is such a thing (yet perhaps) as an architecturally distinguished uPVC window frame.
Functional, undeniably. But not distinguished.
And nowhere near as 'green' as sustainable hardwood.
Whether uPVC is a visual improvement does depend on what went before!

There should also be quite a choice in the glazing units themselves. Invisible coating to minimise heat loss is fairly common nowadays. Extra separation is used to give better noise insulation. Special gas (Argon) is used to give better thermal (and sound?) insulation. Special glasses are used for self-cleaning, enhanced security and... ?
I believe that different manufacturers of the glazing units have different expectations (and warranty) on the durability of the sealing of their units.
However some suppliers would be restricted to standard thickness glazing units by the standard extrusions they use for framing.
Treacodactyl

Not sure if this is any help but Screwfix sell windows, prices including frames & glass:

Washing my mouth out with soap and water, PVCu: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId=101919&ts=72875

Timber (softwood): http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId=102072&ts=72875
Nick

The existing windows are of the aluminium frame, single glazed variety. The house a fairly modern (60's?) red brick terrace. No style required. We're after functional, on a (tight) budget here. Screwfix. now, there's an idea...

Thank you, TD.
Gervase

UPVC bad idea - heavy metals are used as plasticisers, lifespan of only 25 years, petrochemical-based, non-recyclable.
Use timber if at all possible (besides, it'll stop your place looking like a council house). Magnet have double-glazed timber windows at a price to match UPVC. Or, even better, find a joiner locally via Thomson or Yellow Pages. You could get proper, workshop-made timber windows fior around 350. Windows that are repairable, carbon neutral, attractive and with a potential life of a couple of centuries.
It's a no-brainer. Only chavs choose plastic.
Jamanda

We just had new French Windows put in. Nice wooden ones that open properly instead of the horrid aluminium sliding affair that only opened a couple of foot, but you could lift right out of it's mountings even when it was locked. I don't think we've been billed yet, and the quote was so long ago I've forgotten.

We are also going to replace the white UPVC things at the front which you can't open properly with wooden sash windows.
Treacodactyl

If you do decide to buy from Screwfix it might be worth seeing if you have an outlet store nearby, saves delivery damage if the store stocks them.

Wickes also sell PVCu and timber windows which you can collect if they are a standard size. IIRC B&G has some as well.
Jonnyboy

Gervase wrote:
UPVC bad idea - heavy metals are used as plasticisers, lifespan of only 25 years, petrochemical-based, non-recyclable.
Use timber if at all possible (besides, it'll stop your place looking like a council house). Magnet have double-glazed timber windows at a price to match UPVC. Or, even better, find a joiner locally via Thomson or Yellow Pages. You could get proper, workshop-made timber windows fior around 350. Windows that are repairable, carbon neutral, attractive and with a potential life of a couple of centuries.
It's a no-brainer. Only chavs choose plastic.


You cheeky ****
Treacodactyl

I think our house was one of the last to have it's windows replaced from timber & metal to PVCu. All the other houses are PVCu, one or two might be old aluminium and I expect buyers round here would be put off if we had good quality hardwood windows as they expect PVCu. I know PVCu is 'orrible stuff but many people love it unfortunately.
Gervase

Jonnyboy wrote:
You cheeky ****

Cheeky? Moi? Wink
Behemoth

Treacodactyl wrote:
I think our house was one of the last to have it's windows replaced from timber & metal to PVCu. All the other houses are PVCu, one or two might be old aluminium and I expect buyers round here would be put off if we had good quality hardwood windows as they expect PVCu. I know PVCu is 'orrible stuff but many people love it unfortunately.


I agree. We replaced our derelict sash windows at the back of the house with cheap plastic as a temporary measure until we had the cash to install new timber sash windows. However round here plastic is king and my lovingly restored sash windows at the front will be seen negatively if we ever sell.
sean

Treacodactyl wrote:
I think our house was one of the last to have it's windows replaced from timber & metal to PVCu. All the other houses are PVCu, one or two might be old aluminium and I expect buyers round here would be put off if we had good quality hardwood windows as they expect PVCu. I know PVCu is 'orrible stuff but many people love it unfortunately.


It's 'maintenance free' innit? Confused
I hate the stuff and it ruins the look of older houses. Certainly estate agents always seem to mention it as a benefit.
Graham The Builder

Gervase wrote:
It's a no-brainer. Only chavs choose plastic.


A bit of a sweeping statement there, Gervase?? Confused Nearly all new houses are fitted with upvc windows as standard these days because of better thermal performance and minimal maintenance. A lot of new wooden windows and doors don't come upto latest thermal regulations which force most new builds to adopt the policy of fitting upvc. Don't get me wrong, I like wooden windows and have built quite a few houses and extensions using them but if the customer doesn't paint the things they tend to rot out rather quickly to be replaced with plastic.

If you do replace your windows in your house you will either have to inform the local building control office which will inspect them for thermal/structural reasons (if you fit them) or use an affiliated window fitter who are self regulated to carry out the work.

As for the price of a window - how long is a piece of string? Confused Dependant on spec. and size the price can vary quite a bit.
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