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gregreeve

Results of Fungus Foray and request for ID

doctoral and myself went for a fungus foray in Wiltshire on Friday 27th Oct. A few pics of some choice specimens and a request for a fungus ID and a berries ID (below).

We filled our baskets with Amethyst deceiver, plentry of common yellow russula, parasol mushroom, some honey fungus (although someone had been along earlier and had been harvesting it), and Helvella.

Some pics of our other finds are

Panther caps:

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Aminata Muscaria (Fly Agaric):


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Helvella:


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Earthball (note the 10p):


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FINALLY - WHAT IS THIS ONE?:

We thought the blusher? Its defiately an Aminata - any ideas?


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and again:


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Last but not least what is this vine - doctoral tried the berries and spat them out so I guess its not edible??


Click to see full size image

Thanks to doctoral for a great forage. My mush has dried in the airing cupboard ready for a rainy day...

Greg
Treacodactyl

The vine looks like black bryony Tamus communis to me. A quote from here: http://www.the-tree.org.uk/EnchantedForest/WoodlandFlowers/blackbryony.htm "the plant is dangerous in unskilled hands and can cause violent vomiting." so spitting it out was probably best.
Jamanda

Great pictures. I wanted to come, but was told it was too far away!

The berries and leaves definitely look like black bryony to me too - I like the website you linked the ID to Treacodactyl.

And an excuse to get my shiny, new book smelling Roger Phillips book out. In my very humble and tentative opinion the mystery mushroom could be A. phalloides, the deathcap. I look forwards to seeing what the experts think. There's a fantastic description of what happens if you eat it! Wow! definitely one to avoid!
pizza

Definitely not a phalloides. My best guess is that it's the strangest-looking muscaria I've ever seen.
Jamanda

pizza wrote:
Definitely not a phalloides. My best guess is that it's the strangest-looking muscaria I've ever seen.


I tried but I failed Sad

Why is it a muscaria?
Cathryn

I have just been on a walk through a woodland near Barmouth and saw at least a dozen different varieties of fungus but none of these. (I don't know what they are as the fungi book is packed in a box while we are having work done on the house) It was a mixed woodland of birch, oak, holly and lots more - whereas your photos seem to suggest a mainly beech woodland?

I will shrink them and post them in a minute (duaghter wants to use computer at the moment)
mimborin

Amanita muscaria var. formosa perhaps? I have recently come across a few of these in hampshire.

http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/gallery/DisplayBlock~bid~5545.asp

Edit: Then again perhaps not - these according to rogers are only found in north america, although I am sure there is a version of the variant over here.
mimborin

Ok, perhaps there is not a version of the variant over here, anyway I would go for Amanita muscaria and a strange one at that.


anand50

mushroom

Muscaria is unlikely because this mushroom sems too young for spots to have come off. My guess is Amanita crocea, although this mushroom seems a bit redder than this species. What tree was it under?
cab

Jamanda wrote:

Why is it a muscaria?


Process of elimination, really. Can't see what else it can be. One of those times whent he picture doesn't really match anything; you'd need to have hold of the specimen and give it a thorough going over.
Stewy

Looks like a Fly Agaric to me that's had the spots washed off from heavy rain but the cap seems a bit small Confused
mimborin

Maybe heavy rain also affects the colour? I know that the toxins are supposed to be water soluble but is the red dye as well?

If you have cooked this as per instructions you may know. I have never had the will to do so since risk reward ratio is too high when there are so many other delicious mushrooms to eat, but if I come across an A. Muscaria any time soon I may experiment...

*exits to cackles of mad evil scientist laughter*
cab

mimborin wrote:
Maybe heavy rain also affects the colour?


Certainly does get rather washed out with rain.

Although even after washing out, its basically poison.
gregreeve

More on the strange fungi

Guys - thanks for the assistance here.

Woodland was mixed but mostly beech with some oak and birch. The strangest thing was the fact that the cap was not the same colour all over. I have come across different cooured muscaria before (having snapped a nice orange one some years ago) but this was streaked across the cap.

It was definately a young specimen - maybe a marlborough mutation ??

doctoral - sounds good that you spat the berries out - and I was right on the other aminata we found it was a tawny grisette - I didn't eat it though I don't touch the aminatas - I too have read Rogers guide and it was enough to put me off any of them.

CHeers

Greg
wildfoodie

I tried tawny grisettes this year - delicious! the shroom pic I think is a blusher - flimsy but persistent ring, and the cap is quite typical of blushers experiencing wet weather conditions.
mystery berries black bryony poisonous tho spring shoots I think are edible as a pickled veg. ... hmm
shame on you doctoral for tasting something you hadn't positively id'ed first... !
doctoral

Re: More on the strange fungi

gregreeve wrote:
Guys - thanks for the assistance here.

Woodland was mixed but mostly beech with some oak and birch. The strangest thing was the fact that the cap was not the same colour all over. I have come across different cooured muscaria before (having snapped a nice orange one some years ago) but this was streaked across the cap.

It was definately a young specimen - maybe a marlborough mutation ??

doctoral - sounds good that you spat the berries out - and I was right on the other aminata we found it was a tawny grisette - I didn't eat it though I don't touch the aminatas - I too have read Rogers guide and it was enough to put me off any of them.

CHeers

Greg



Hi Greg - thanks for the great company and knowledgeable walk and talk.

I checked the vine out when I got back to the car - it was almost definitely a black bryony - at the time, the chances were it was either that or a form of nightshade - that's why I spat several times!

The reddish mottled amanita was growing next to several more mature amanitas, which looked like panther caps. Two growing together at the base showed different stages of development - the younger one had the reddish colouring on the cap, whereas the older one didn't.

The a. muscaria was definitely that, although a small specimen and rather washed out from persistant rain the previous 2 days Exclamation

The tawny grisette I had was less than a mouthful Sad

All in all, a very productive foray - I even found a treeful of oysters on the way home Very Happy

P.S. For anyone who wants to comment on tasting, first you have to know how poisonous something could be - the vine would never have killed me if I spat all the berry out - on the other hand I would never try an amanita regardless of how many ID's I managed to get on several fresh specimens - there is always a possibility that it is not a caesars mushroom and that it may be a previously unidentified form of death or panther cap, i.e. containing orellanin - know thine enemy Shocked
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