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Treacodactyl

Small, portable, wood stoves

Has anyone used something like this? http://www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor/fire-spout-100.htm

It would be useful for camping but also useful for cooking outside at home, thus using up the huge amounts of twigs we collect from gardening and saving a bit of gas. It looks ideal for a quick stir-fry, omelette or similar.
marigold

No, but I think I might need one Very Happy . Looks like a useful idea.
Went

Seems it would be simple to make somehting out of scrap for next to nothing....alternatively, what's wrong with a good old fashioned campfire?
RichardW

Ian33568 wrote:
Seems it would be simple to make somehting out of scrap for next to nothing....alternatively, what's wrong with a good old fashioned campfire?


They were the same two thoughts I had. Virtualy any large sized tin can would work. Just not as flat pack-able but then you could put your cooking pots in it.

Richard
Treacodactyl

marigold wrote:
No, but I think I might need one Very Happy . Looks like a useful idea.


Indeed, and having used a Kelly kettle it's impressive how much heat you can get out of a few twigs.

Ian33568 wrote:
Seems it would be simple to make somehting out of scrap for next to nothing....alternatively, what's wrong with a good old fashioned campfire?


I've tried making something out of a large old can and I have some plans but for under 20 it's not that expensive to buy.

The idea of these stoves is that they burn the wood efficiently so you get a good amount of heat from the wood, something a camp fire isn't good at. I expect they'll burn hotter with less smoke so more friendly for use in the garden.

There's some more ideas, advice and plans here: http://zenstoves.net/Wood.htm
Went

Treacodactyl wrote:
marigold wrote:
No, but I think I might need one Very Happy . Looks like a useful idea.


Indeed, and having used a Kelly kettle it's impressive how much heat you can get out of a few twigs.

Ian33568 wrote:
Seems it would be simple to make somehting out of scrap for next to nothing....alternatively, what's wrong with a good old fashioned campfire?


I've tried making something out of a large old can and I have some plans but for under 20 it's not that expensive to buy.

The idea of these stoves is that they burn the wood efficiently so you get a good amount of heat from the wood, something a camp fire isn't good at. I expect they'll burn hotter with less smoke so more friendly for use in the garden.

There's some more ideas, advice and plans here: http://zenstoves.net/Wood.htm


When we first moved here we had no kitchen for three weeks and I managed to cook outside on a campfire for that period without difficulty.....heat didn't seem a problem...must have been my long lost skills as a boy scout coming back to help!
vegplot

RichardW wrote:
Ian33568 wrote:
Seems it would be simple to make somehting out of scrap for next to nothing....alternatively, what's wrong with a good old fashioned campfire?


They were the same two thoughts I had. Virtualy any large sized tin can would work. Just not as flat pack-able but then you could put your cooking pots in it.

Richard


I've just emptied a home brew beer tin it seems to be ideal size. I was going to recycle it but may reuse it.
vegplot

35.00!!!

The home brew tin, with contents, cost 7.99 from Stermat. Not only do you get the tin but with a little sugar and time, 40 pints of beer.
Treacodactyl

Ian33568 wrote:
When we first moved here we had no kitchen for three weeks and I managed to cook outside on a campfire for that period without difficulty.....heat didn't seem a problem...must have been my long lost skills as a boy scout coming back to help!


I've not said it can't be done just that using a stove is far more efficient.
Treacodactyl

vegplot wrote:
35.00!!!

The home brew tin, with contents, cost 7.99 from Stermat. Not only do you get the tin but with a little sugar and time, 40 pints of beer.


The mini one I linked to is 16 + p&p, so under 20.

As mentioned, I've tried making a stove out of a large tin can but it took quite a while and doesn't seem to last long. The heat seems to make it rust very quickly.

If I could get hold of a better tin I'd have another go.
Jamanda

I fancy the idea of the one for the beach.
vegplot

Treacodactyl wrote:
vegplot wrote:
35.00!!!

The home brew tin, with contents, cost 7.99 from Stermat. Not only do you get the tin but with a little sugar and time, 40 pints of beer.


The mini one I linked to is 16 + p&p, so under 20.

As mentioned, I've tried making a stove out of a large tin can but it took quite a while and doesn't seem to last long. The heat seems to make it rust very quickly.

If I could get hold of a better tin I'd have another go.


It has the advantage of folding flat. I'd like to see it's price drop a bit though.
Blue Sky

That's cool. I want one.

Dave?
Jonnyboy

I scrounged one of those three legged racks that comes with a combi microwave. It's perfect for sitting above a small wood fire and is very stable. Doesn't rust either.
sean

Hmm, just paid fifteen quid for a refill for the camping gas stove. Admittedly it'll last for yonks. Any idea what the expected lifespan of one of those little woodburners is?
RichardW

A few flat bits of steel & a few hinges welded / riveted / self taped on & your sorted with a folding one.
Treacodactyl

Treacodactyl wrote:
vegplot wrote:
35.00!!!

The home brew tin, with contents, cost 7.99 from Stermat. Not only do you get the tin but with a little sugar and time, 40 pints of beer.


The mini one I linked to is 16 + p&p, so under 20.

As mentioned, I've tried making a stove out of a large tin can but it took quite a while and doesn't seem to last long. The heat seems to make it rust very quickly.

If I could get hold of a better tin I'd have another go.


Oops, I didn't link to the mini one did I. Sorry vegplot. Embarassed This is the one I meant to link to: http://www.occuk.co.uk/outdoor/fire-spout-mini.htm

RichardW wrote:
A few flat bits of steel & a few hinges welded / riveted / self taped on & your sorted with a folding one.


I'd be more than happy to make one but it's not going to be cheap to get hold of some suitable stainless steel, I have a welder but it'll need some stuff to weld s/steel. Even if I make one that doesn't need hinges or welding it's still going to take a while to cut out & fold. I'm not sure I could make one for the cost.

One option might be to look out for a suitable old s/steel saucepan and use that as a base as I don't need it to be portable. But then it'll just get added to an ever growing list of things to make...
Treacodactyl

sean wrote:
Hmm, just paid fifteen quid for a refill for the camping gas stove. Admittedly it'll last for yonks. Any idea what the expected lifespan of one of those little woodburners is?


No idea about lifespan, or indeed how useful they are, that's why I'm asking. For me I don't need it to be portable and this one looks better for my needs but it's from the US. http://www.trailstove.com/

One think, I'm not sure if you can use these things while camping as they might be classed as an open fire rather than a BBQ or gas stove, so many places might not allow them.
Jonnyboy

Why not use a hexy stove?
Treacodactyl

Jonnyboy wrote:
Why not use a hexy stove?


Do you mean those things that often use solid blocks of fuel? I have one but it's just like an open fire.

What I'm after is something like a Kelly kettle or a decent wood stove, i.e. the gasses given off by the wood are burnt generating far more heat and much less smoke.
Treacodactyl

Another idea although they've sold out at the moment: http://trekdirect.co.uk/acatalog/Pocket_Cooker.html

A long review from bushcraftuk on the trailstove:

http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6615

And a comparison to other stoves:

http://www.geographycards.com/privatepagesforstaff/campstove/
Jamanda

Treacodactyl wrote:
sean wrote:
Hmm, just paid fifteen quid for a refill for the camping gas stove. Admittedly it'll last for yonks. Any idea what the expected lifespan of one of those little woodburners is?


No idea about lifespan, or indeed how useful they are, that's why I'm asking. For me I don't need it to be portable and this one looks better for my needs but it's from the US. http://www.trailstove.com/

One think, I'm not sure if you can use these things while camping as they might be classed as an open fire rather than a BBQ or gas stove, so many places might not allow them.


That had occurred to me TD. Plus the pans would get very sooty. I'm not convinced by them as an option for camping - but as I said earlier, one might be good for the beach, and then they could be trialled for their suitability for camping. I think we might get one when we get back from France.
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