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Mrs Fiddlesticks

storage heaters

This is the main source of heating in our house, Does anyone else have them?

Just had an interesting conversation with electrickery board ( I was actually asking about something else but) and he had some information about the use of storage heaters.

He suggested using the boost control to get the max heat out of the things by putting it round to early boost when cold out to get the heat out before it starts re-storing over night otherwise the heat is just locked in all the time. Does that make sense or is it just using more electrickery to heat it all the time. How does the boost control actually work?

How do you use yours?
2steps

we had these in our old house. I never really got the hang of using them and we lived there 6 years Embarassed
Northern_Lad

I got rid of mine as they only heated the house for about 2 hours.

I think what he means is that when they switch on (11pm?) they 'over-produce' heat, warming the room above the ambient level. They can then spend the rest of the night storing heat.

Not convinced myself. Much better to get central heating (not that you can get gas though) and use the heat bricks to build a bar-be-que.
Mrs Fiddlesticks

I don't think the outlay would justify it to be honest. As you say we've not got gas in this village. A neighbour changed from a coal fired boiler to an LPG gas one and that alone involved big new walls in garden to shield the new gas tank plus works in the house and kitchen. She had the radiators and pipe work to start with, which must have helped the cost - we don't!

They do seem to work ok in this house. I get the impression from the bumpf that came with them that the heaters were positioned and chosen for size relative to the room sizes almost as though it was as an intergrated system.

We also have an odd electrickery tariff - there are 3 meters ( no really) One is standard day rate stuff, one economy 7 style night rate and one which is purely for the storage heaters and immersion. The neat thing about this third meter is that as well as charging up the heaters at night cheaply it also gives them a boost for about an hour in the afternoon so that they've not run out of heat for the evening. Its actually for this reason we've not been able to change to a green tariff as no one else deals with 3 meters!

The whole house is only 12 years old so I'm guessing its reasonably well insulated.

For the most part it works well, we just get caught out if there is a sudden temperature change. It means we keep it on the warm side if anything to try and minimise that.
dougal

Mrs Fiddlesticks wrote:
We also have an odd electrickery tariff - there are 3 meters ( no really) One is standard day rate stuff, one economy 7 style night rate and one which is purely for the storage heaters and immersion. The neat thing about this third meter is that as well as charging up the heaters at night cheaply it also gives them a boost for about an hour in the afternoon so that they've not run out of heat for the evening. Its actually for this reason we've not been able to change to a green tariff as no one else deals with 3 meters!


The storage radiators will be on an "Economy 10" tariff. Its not that unusual - in the regions where it is available. Its more expensive than E7 and rather cheaper than standard rate.

Insulation is a major factor in making storage radiators work.
And usually (I believe) local councils have extra grants available to help insulate electrically-heated properties.

A couple of odd ideas for you.
You can get electric central heating boilers. These work exactly like ordinary central heating systems, but just with an electric heater (quite compact) instead of a boiler.
Storage radiators are not totally unreasonable for 24/7 heating of well insulated homes, but the electric central heating can be a better idea if the house is empty all day.
And where it can really score is with the much more complicated plumbing of a heat bank or thermal store. Heat that as much as possible on Economy7 and then play the heat out to the house with a ch system only as needed and it can look quite sensible.
Or there's Ground Source Heat Pumps...

But if you have electric heating - INSULATE !
Quote:
For the most part it works well, we just get caught out if there is a sudden temperature change. It means we keep it on the warm side if anything to try and minimise that.
... and pay close attention to the weather forecast! They are really pretty good on the 'shape' of the weather for the next 24 hours, and surprisingly accurate on many timing details. Worth attending to.
Armchair

Cavity wall insulation if you haven't got it already and 250mm of insulation in the loft!
Mrs Fiddlesticks

Armchair wrote:
Cavity wall insulation if you haven't got it already and 250mm of insulation in the loft!

think the loft is ok, don't know much about cavity wall insulation. As a house that was built in 1994 what sort of insulation would it have had as standard ( brick and tile built detached box)
Armchair

Mrs Fiddlesticks wrote:
Armchair wrote:
Cavity wall insulation if you haven't got it already and 250mm of insulation in the loft!

think the loft is ok, don't know much about cavity wall insulation. As a house that was built in 1994 what sort of insulation would it have had as standard ( brick and tile built detached box)


I should know the answer to that but don't I'm afraid! I'll ask the guys at work tomorrow and see if they know.

If you have a gas meter box an external wall, you can often peer inside the cavity to see if there is any insulation, otherwise get a couple of insulation companies round to give you quotes. The insulating of both walls and lofts has a very quick pay-back period on your heating bills, much quicker than double-glazing Smile
cuff

hard to remember but think it was 50mm dritherm quilt or poly block
lily

I live in a exposed 1940's house that has cavity wall insulation. Only ever needed a tog 4.5 duvet on the bed except on the coldest of nights. Also curtains with thermal lining helps alot.
Armchair

Mrs Fiddlesticks, the chaps at work believe that by 1994 cavity wall insulation was commonly installed on new homes. However it may not have been mandatory so it would be worth having someone drill a hole in the wall to confirm whether or not you have it (assuming you can't see anything through the gas meter box or in the loft).
Mrs Fiddlesticks

Armchair wrote:
Mrs Fiddlesticks, the chaps at work believe that by 1994 cavity wall insulation was commonly installed on new homes. However it may not have been mandatory so it would be worth having someone drill a hole in the wall to confirm whether or not you have it (assuming you can't see anything through the gas meter box or in the loft).


that's interesting, we'll have a look then. We've no gas meter but we'll have a look in the loft etc. Thanx
dougal

Mrs Fiddlesticks wrote:
Armchair wrote:
Mrs Fiddlesticks, the chaps at work believe that by 1994 cavity wall insulation was commonly installed on new homes. However it may not have been mandatory so it would be worth having someone drill a hole in the wall to confirm whether or not you have it (assuming you can't see anything through the gas meter box or in the loft).


that's interesting, we'll have a look then. We've no gas meter but we'll have a look in the loft etc. Thanx


Its also worth (and with electric heating well worth) remembering the difference between "that which makes the greatest sense" and "the minimum required by the regulations" - for example regarding the amount of roof insulation.

And, umm, shouldn't there be a surveyor's report floating around somewhere?
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