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billfromlachine

testing garden picture posting....

Folks,

Let's see if these pictures from my garden works.

Regards
Bill

First picture along the fence are black raspberries + red currants protected by netting to keep the birds away...lol.

In the foreground some potatoes and yellow bush beans.

In the back some tomato plants and in the front celery root.


Click to see full size image

2nd picture covers a bit more garden you can see in this pictures 3 raised beds in the back part well there's a total of 18 tomato plants mostly standard red tomatoes with a couple of plants of cherry tomatoes and yellow tomatoes so my wife can make her famous tomato marmalade. Last year 250 lbs or so of tomatoes. There's a good size basil plant in the front of one of the boxes(we use that fresh also to make pesto which we freeze in ice cube trays and use throughout the year) .

Front box of the left is some lavender and winter savory. Along the back fence there's some more black raspberries and red currants.


Click to see full size image



Click to see full size image

In the foreground an elderberry bush. Along the side of the storage shed with the hoops and netting we have some swiss chard and brussel sprouts to protect them from insects. also there's some garlic and more black raspberry bushes along the fence which should start producing next year.



Click to see full size image

In this box there's some more celery roots and brussel sprouts, a couple of extra hot habanero pepper plants, leaf lettuce and some garlic and green onions/scallions, not shown in pots behind this bed are some carrots as well as assorted herbs such as sage, rosemary, thyme, oregano, etc...and along the back off the house we have some black currant bushes.



Click to see full size image
sean

Not for me.

You can post photos directly to the forum using the 'Attach File' link at the bottom of the text box.
billfromlachine

Sean,

OK just reposted directly as thumbnails. Thank you for the assist.

Regards

Bill
sean

Looks good. Very Happy
billfromlachine

Sean,

It's surprising how much you can grow in a relatively small space. We've already picked about 10 lbs of red currants and still probably that amount left to pick.

I'll be heading out to give my wife a hand shortly.....she'll be running out of preserving jars..... Laughing Laughing Laughing

Regards

Bill
gz

great seeing successful deep beds..aren't these bed walls things that come round pallets of tiles or something similar?
billfromlachine

gz,

These were actually made from what's called composite wood which is a misnomer since they're actually made from recycled compressed plastic but it does help the environment and zero maintenance.

You could also make them out of salvaged pallet wood or other reused material.

Raised beds in our area is pretty much the only option as our soil is heavy clay and like concrete to work with otherwise.

Regards

Bill

great seeing successful deep beds..aren't these bed walls things that come round pallets of tiles or something similar?
Mistress Rose

When I was a child we lived on clay. Dad used to slab it up in the autumn with a spade and let it break down over winter. He added a lot of compost I think too. FIL added so much leaf mould to his garden (courtesy of the local wood) that it is now quite nice soil.

We have raised beds as I find them easier to deal with and far less daunting than being faced with a large patch of ground. Ours have wooden sides, but need to be rebuilt, as even the oak they are made from rots in time.
DavidLaw

looks nice ..! Smile
dpack

tidy ( unlike my yard )

the composite recycled plastic for bed sides is an ace idea, did you get them as flatpack kits or is it a matter of cutting lengths, slots etc etc ?
gz

gz,

These were actually made from what's called composite wood which is a misnomer since they're actually made from recycled compressed plastic but it does help the environment and zero maintenance.

You could also make them out of salvaged pallet wood or other reused material.

Raised beds in our area is pretty much the only option as our soil is heavy clay and like concrete to work with otherwise.

Regards

Bill

great seeing successful deep beds..aren't these bed walls things that come round pallets of tiles or something similar?


Our soil is the same...like a sodden sponge the minute it rains,like a brick otherwise Confused
Shan

Looks very tidy and well organised.

I can relate to the raised beds as we are on a mix of heavy clay and massive rocks.
billfromlachine

Mistress Rose,

The current beds were installed last spring, however, prior to that they were wood and were badly rotting away.

Now we just have cedar wood boards along the back and side fence and cedar has a long life without treating it, however, it is very costly.

Regards + HH

Bill



When I was a child we lived on clay. Dad used to slab it up in the autumn with a spade and let it break down over winter. He added a lot of compost I think too. FIL added so much leaf mould to his garden (courtesy of the local wood) that it is now quite nice soil.

We have raised beds as I find them easier to deal with and far less daunting than being faced with a large patch of ground. Ours have wooden sides, but need to be rebuilt, as even the oak they are made from rots in time. billfromlachine

Shan,

Thank you. We have been gardening this plot for 30+ years and the first years rocks, rocks and more rocks along with tons of mulch, compost, peat moss, etc to build up and loosen the soil....so it took a long time to get things to this stage.

Regards + HH

Bill

Looks very tidy and well organised.

I can relate to the raised beds as we are on a mix of heavy clay and massive rocks. Mistress Rose

We use our own western red cedar for the compost heap boards, but used oak for the raised beds. We have made a raised bed for son's in laws our of western red cedar. We really need to repair ours with some. billfromlachine

dpack,

They came as flatpack kits so it was a fairly simple matter of putting them together.

Regards

Bill

tidy ( unlike my yard )

the composite recycled plastic for bed sides is an ace idea, did you get them as flatpack kits or is it a matter of cutting lengths, slots etc etc ? billfromlachine

Mistress Rose,

Well I must admit the pastic wood kits are rather expensive but given the fact we are getting up in age we decided to go with them due to no maintenance.

Regards
Bill

We use our own western red cedar for the compost heap boards, but used oak for the raised beds. We have made a raised bed for son's in laws our of western red cedar. We really need to repair ours with some. gregotyn

I thought the sides were euro pallet sides, which build up on a pallet normally, but in a garden situation the base would be omitted. I like the idea of them being recycled plastic, no maintenance appeals!
I have done this with tyres stacked on top of each other a few times, but I get a lot of the wooden sides from work, so may try to use them to grow spuds in, adding a layer at a time as the potatoes grow upwards. By growing this way you get more potatoes to the footprint, so getting lots of potatoes from a given, smaller area. I can't remember the said record of growing this way, but think it is about 1cwt. from one tuber of main crop. I may have a go next year trying the same thing but using a pallet underneath, and using the conventional euro sides-it can only go wrong!
Thank you Bill for the idea.
billfromlachine

gregotyn,

You're welcome, actually you could probably go to the maximum height at the beginning and just fill in with more and more earth or compost as the plants get taller.

Regards

Bill

I thought the sides were euro pallet sides, which build up on a pallet normally, but in a garden situation the base would be omitted. I like the idea of them being recycled plastic, no maintenance appeals!
I have done this with tyres stacked on top of each other a few times, but I get a lot of the wooden sides from work, so may try to use them to grow spuds in, adding a layer at a time as the potatoes grow upwards. By growing this way you get more potatoes to the footprint, so getting lots of potatoes from a given, smaller area. I can't remember the said record of growing this way, but think it is about 1cwt. from one tuber of main crop. I may have a go next year trying the same thing but using a pallet underneath, and using the conventional euro sides-it can only go wrong!
Thank you Bill for the idea. dpack

dpack,

They came as flatpack kits so it was a fairly simple matter of putting them together.

Regards

Bill

tidy ( unlike my yard )

the composite recycled plastic for bed sides is an ace idea, did you get them as flatpack kits or is it a matter of cutting lengths, slots etc etc ?

thanks Wink
billfromlachine

Folks,

The plastic wood kits are rather expensive. If you have access to some old pallets here's a video showing how you can make your own raised beds for minimal expense.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yEfAWWnYys

Regards

Bill
Jam Lady

Anyone ever tried straw bale gardening?

https://bonnieplants.com/library/how-to-condition-and-plant-a-bale-of-straw/

Not especially pretty but does work well. And as the straw breaks down in a year or two it adds organic matter to the garden.

The slope behind / to one side of the house is where a plateau was bulldozed out of the slope to have a place to build the house. It is a "friendly" clay soil (not suitable for pottery, gz) and in the beginning I used to dig in generous helpings of gypsum. That flocculates the fine clay particles - fancy word that means they clump together - and improves drainage.
dpack

yep.

i covered some very compacted and weedy clay with small bales
planted squash/pumpkin in holes full of compost
fed with mixture=good crop

by the next spring it was pretty good soil with a straw mulch
year after good soil
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