Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Chez

Tumble dryer condenser

We are currently venting our tumble dryer full of nappies by sticking the hose out of the cat-flap, which is causing some consternation in feline-world. To vent it outside involves drilling a four inch hole through an eighteen inch thick granite wall, which seems like

a) a lot of hard work, and
b) wasteful of all that lovely heat (as per the discussion in Las Combas' tumble dryer thread)

So ... rambling along to my question ... has anyone had anything to do with these external condenser-box thingies?
dougal

No, but it looks like it might be interesting if someone tried it!
Marionb

I've had one of those condenser box thingies for years. I use it all the time, however I never put clothes into the tumble dryer until they are pretty dry - never straight from the washing machine, I dry them on the line or around the house first. I use the tumble dryer more to air clothes than actually dry them.

Having said that, even though the clothes are pretty dry when they go into the tumble dryer, the utility room still gets steamy when I use the condenser box - the window in the back door is always steamed up. I would imagine the condensation would be worse if the clothes were wetter when they were put into the tumble dryer but I cant be sure of that though.
Chez

Hmm, that's what I was worried about. I think I might have a word with my father in law about drilling enormous holes through enormous walls - we've already hired a diamond-headed thingy to get through for the out-pipe for the sink.

It's a waste of heat, though :/.
dougal

To work really well, the condenser has to be the coldest thing around - so a metal (good heat losing) box for doing the condensing would be rather better than a plastic (insulating) one.
Keeping the actual condenser itself as close to room temperature as possible (maybe using a small {ex-computer?} fan might help) will make the majority of condensation happen where you want it!
The drier (and larger) the airspace that it vents into, the less nuisance condensation there should be on unavoidably colder-than-room-temperature things (like single-glazed windows).
Marionb

That explains quite a lot of our condensation, then, Dougal. Our utility room is a cold room (built on single storey extension - more of a corridor thats wider at one end really) and its small.
James

Chez wrote:
Hmm, that's what I was worried about. I think I might have a word with my father in law about drilling enormous holes through enormous walls - we've already hired a diamond-headed thingy to get through for the out-pipe for the sink.

It's a waste of heat, though :/.


I recently installed a fan in our kitchen using a 4" diamond core through an 8" wall.
From my experience, its really important to wear gloves, eye protection and a face mask. It was the most horribly frightening job I've ever had to do. A very, very heavy drill rotating very very fast with a huge diamond core sitting on the end. It was extremely worrying. My partner had to leave the house & go for a walk. My next door neighbours 4 year old though the noise was a monster & started crying uncontrolably (maybe take chez junior out for a walk?).

Take it very slowly & take regular breaks. slowly slowly catchy monkey.

Having said all that, it only took about 30 minutes to drill the hole(with 3 or four breaks) I skinned 3 knuckles (that was before I decided to wear gloves) and brused my arms a fare amount( nothing that wouldnt heal in a few days). The drill kicks like a mule if it doesn't sit centrally in the hole. And when something that powerfull kicks, your hands/ arms dont stand much of a chance. And unless you do this regularly, it will kick , so be prepared and ware protective equipment.
joanne

As the for heat issue - could you put one of those plastic greenhouses on the other side of the wall and maybe grow some salad or something in it - be worth a try
RichardW

James wrote:

1, I recently installed a fan in our kitchen using a 4" diamond core through an 8" wall.

2, From my experience, its really important to wear gloves, eye protection and a face mask. It was the most horribly frightening job I've ever had to do.

3, A very, very heavy drill rotating very very fast with a huge diamond core sitting on the end. It was extremely worrying.

4, Take it very slowly & take regular breaks. slowly slowly catchy monkey.

5, Having said all that, it only took about 30 minutes to drill the hole


Hi,

1, Big difference between brick & stone / granite walls.

2, Absolutly

3, You should use a slow rotating drill. Also instead of a diamind tipped one you can get inpact tipped ones which do work will on stone / granite.

4, Thats what I keep telling my OH 3 YEARS is not to long to drilla 6 inch hole through a DOUBLE skined granite wall.

5, Have done bricks & blocks in that sort of time but forget trying to do a stone wall in any thing like that amount of time. Its is easier & quicker to use a sledge hammer bolster pick ect & make a big hole by removing the stones, put a fixed pipe through & re fill hole with smaller stones & mortar. Lots easier too.


Justme
James

yep, I'd agree with justme.
brick is only a little harder than chalk (especially our bricks). Granite is ...well...rock hard. My boss has a house built from granite boulders and I think he took out indevidual rocks when putting a hole in the wall. No doubt this is quite a worrying thing to do.

An edit on the very fast drill- the drill I hired was actually a slow drill, but even a slow drill is rotating fast enough to do quite a lot of damage if wrongly used.



Oh yeh---and wear ear protection also. The sound is terrible and even with good ear muffs, you'll be half deaf for the rest of the afternoon.

(your hire company has a legal obligation to ensure you have all the correct protective equipment and know how to use the equipment safely & correctly.)
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home