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cab

Velvet Shank?

Can anything, other than perhaps the sulfur tuft, be mistaken for velvet shank (Flammulina velupides)? Lots of it about at the moment, and I might be tempted to reccomend it if after some more thoughts on whether there are any dubious lookalikes.
gingerwelly

well could not find or think of any .... this is a ok page (they dont say there are any other lookalikes) http://www.tastymushroompartnership.co.uk/profile_velvetshank.html
dpack

we have loads of the pictured about . but ...... a new one to me as food .. i reckon the purple over layed colour on the stem would be the big visual clue for velvet shanks . who wants to go first ?
wildfoodie

so Cab did you try the velvet shank? are you still alive?
Jacky
cab

wildfood junkie wrote:
so Cab did you try the velvet shank? are you still alive?
Jacky


Still alive Smile

I've aten velvet shank a couple of times over the years. Between you and me, it's okay but not special, but as it seems quite hard to mistake it for anything else it might be one to reccomend.
dpack

ok i get brave ,thankyou .
zigs

good luck dpack Wink

velvet shanks are one of the few edibles that grow in the frost, you should be fine, i've eaten them, bit bland, sulphur tufts would blow the steam out of your ears Very Happy
Zarza

What is the smell of velvet shank?

I think I've found them. They smell of anise, or something like that, very pleasant. Cut across has no meat, just the gills.
jamsam

now if i was in anyway desperate, sad or aged 13 i would piss myself at the question.."whats the smell of a velvet shank?".......

anyone else...nooo..ok...im off...
cab

Zarza wrote:
What is the smell of velvet shank?


Sweet, pleasant mushroomy.
Leif

Zarza wrote:
What is the smell of velvet shank?

I think I've found them. They smell of anise, or something like that, very pleasant. Cut across has no meat, just the gills.


The smell is not strong and is fungal. definetely not anise.

There are similar species that the inexperienced could mistake for Velvet Shank, including deadly poisonous Galerina species. But it is not hard to tell them apart.

The stem has no ring, and no scales, is initially orange, becoming black velvet. The cap is orange, and very rubbery, not breaking up into bits when squeezed between two fingers.
Zarza

Thanks cab and Leif.

Ah, Leif... Welcome to the forum.
Stewy

Hi Leif, where abouts in the world are you if you don't mind me asking?
Leif

Stewy wrote:
Hi Leif, where abouts in the world are you if you don't mind me asking?


I'm in Luton. It's a pretty awful place if you ask me.

Leif
doctoral

Re: Velvet Shank?

cab wrote:
Can anything, other than perhaps the sulfur tuft, be mistaken for velvet shank (Flammulina velupides)? Lots of it about at the moment, and I might be tempted to reccomend it if after some more thoughts on whether there are any dubious lookalikes.


Shocked Not even a sulphur tuft can be mistaken for a velvet shank.

Sulphur Tuft - greenish gills but no velvet shank
Velvet shank - velvet shank, but no greenish gills.

This was one that I pointed out to gregreeve during our foray - there are lots of sulphur tufts out there this year.
cab

Re: Velvet Shank?

doctoral wrote:

Shocked Not even a sulphur tuft can be mistaken for a velvet shank.


Yep, thats now entirely apparent to me. Had to pick some velvet shanks last winter (back when this was first posted) to be sure of it though!
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