Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment
gz

whats this one,Buzzy?



We worked at a smallholding at the Water of Minnoch...they have fruit trees, willow,pine about there,plus heather and grass
buzzy

That's the Two-banded Longhorn Beetle (Rhagium bifasciatum) supposedly a common species, though I don't recall having seen it.

Larvae feed on dead wood, I expect the adults feed on nectar.

Good picture.

Henry
buzzy

Sometimes it seems to be in the genus Hagrium

Henry
gz

There is plenty of dead wood around...they used pine poles for building garden steps/borders 15 yeas ago and most are getting soft.
Also the forestry is sometimes badly cleared when felling,so in some blocks there is a lot of dead wood
dpack

as well as woodland recycling they do know about snazzy dressing.
Mistress Rose

Very Happy
buzzy

There is plenty of dead wood around...they used pine poles for building garden steps/borders 15 yeas ago and most are getting soft.
Also the forestry is sometimes badly cleared when felling,so in some blocks there is a lot of dead wood


Dead wood is good! It feeds lots of invertebrates, including handsome beetles like this one. Everybody who cuts down a tree should leave at least some pieces of wood to decay naturally. Smile

Heaps of logs of various sizes make nooks and crannies for many creatures.

Henry
Mistress Rose

The current teaching on forestry is to leave standing and fallen deadwood, but this isn't always followed in conifer plantation as it can be a source of disease. We have seen hornets round the woods so they must be nesting in a tree somewhere, usually in a hole in deadwood.
buzzy

Hornets might be in a bird nest box, or a bat box, if you have those

Henry
dpack

mweep, once we get the boxes into the trees around the orchard vermin removal is somebody else's job . Laughing

i have come across small colony bees in a bird box, they seemed quite happy and a reasonable substitute for avians, afaik they are still there.
buzzy

Nothing wrong with Hornets, as long as you leave them alone. People say they are less prone to unprovoked attacks than your usual wasp.

Henry
dpack

they are ok if you leave em alone, sharing a territory or working in theirs can upset them a bit .

when i built a winter home ( in summer ) the " locals " were a bit tetchy at first, nearly 2 decades on i still have scars from the 5 stings to the leg .
we got on after their initial fury but whatever the literature says they have a poke nastier than bee or wasp .

learning to live with them includes learning when to run at least 25 meters ( away from their nest Laughing )

once they get to know you they seem mostly ok unless surprised or confused .
Slim

Any Asian Longhorn Beetle scares in the British Isles yet?

Definitely worth watching out for! Sightings call for removal of all host trees for something like a mile radius Shocked

The hornets I'm most familiar with here are "bald faced" AKA "white face" that make the classic paper nest on a tree limb (or house soffit) with only one entrance at the bottom. They're quite aggressive. Similar to the type of hornet you're talking about?

On one of my preferred walks (lots of tasty wild mushrooms throughout the year) I pass by a white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) tree with feral honeybees living in it's hollow cavity. Always fun to see if they've survived the winter or not, and to ponder if the cedar helps to keep out wax moth.
tahir

Any Asian Longhorn Beetle scares in the British Isles yet?


yes:

https://www.forestry.gov.uk/asianlonghornbeetle
Mistress Rose

With constant vigilance, to date all infestations have been contained, but it is certainly a worry, as are other potential pests and diseases. We are currently suffering from Chelara ash die back in out woods. We are hoping that a good proportion of the trees will survive, as they are self set and variable, but we are pretty sure we will lose some unfortunately. buzzy

they are ok if you leave em alone, sharing a territory or working in theirs can upset them a bit .

when i built a winter home ( in summer ) the " locals " were a bit tetchy at first, nearly 2 decades on i still have scars from the 5 stings to the leg .
we got on after their initial fury but whatever the literature says they have a poke nastier than bee or wasp .

learning to live with them includes learning when to run at least 25 meters ( away from their nest Laughing )

once they get to know you they seem mostly ok unless surprised or confused .

However, a few years ago my neighbour put her foot in a shoe that contained a hornet. It stung her twice, but she said it wasn't as bad as a standard wasp sting.

Henry
Slim

they are ok if you leave em alone, sharing a territory or working in theirs can upset them a bit .

when i built a winter home ( in summer ) the " locals " were a bit tetchy at first, nearly 2 decades on i still have scars from the 5 stings to the leg .
we got on after their initial fury but whatever the literature says they have a poke nastier than bee or wasp .

learning to live with them includes learning when to run at least 25 meters ( away from their nest Laughing )

once they get to know you they seem mostly ok unless surprised or confused .

However, a few years ago my neighbour put her foot in a shoe that contained a hornet. It stung her twice, but she said it wasn't as bad as a standard wasp sting.

Henry

That settles it then, your hornets are not so nasty as ours! Laughing
dpack

the ones that had me were far nastier than any wasp or bee i have encountered.

if i was to rate em honey bee gets a 1 , wasps get a 1 to 1.5 and derbyshire hornets get a 2 and a bit.

maybe it is me but the huge red lumps seemed a perfect setting for the dissolving flesh at the injection site. once the initial venom necrosis had made soup of finger tip size holes in about 12 hrs it took a bit of decent nursing care and a few months to heal the lesions and a couple of years for the scars to settle.

for comparison the spider that made me think the back of my hand was going to split only gets a 2 on the pain and damage scale.
gz

Any Asian Longhorn Beetle scares in the British Isles yet?


yes:

https://www.forestry.gov.uk/asianlonghornbeetle

That is a scarily long list of hosts Sad
report to the Forestry dept if found?
Slim

If found, report to as many as will listen!

The state of Vermont sent a pancake breakfast to the city of Worcester Massachusetts in gratitude for their rigorous quarantine after it was found there. It was considered that they had saved the nation's largest producing state of maple syrup
Mistress Rose

That was a nice idea Slim. The Forestry Commission is being as vigilant as cuts in staff will allow, and they certainly have some very good people working in the pests and diseases department. Sadly 'free trade' doesn't match with stopping things getting in, especially as border inspections aren't too good with again, cuts in staff. There have been some controls brought in; I don't think chestnut or ash can be imported now, although they can as firewood and other biomass, and that can be a problem if all the infective agents aren't carefully removed. Unlicenced wood shavings for packaging have been the infecive agent in several cases, which is why all reputable makers obey the strict controls in place on its processing. gz



On a dry roadside just outside Forfar...luckily I hadn't driven over it Shocked
buzzy

I'd say that was Northern Marsh Orchid (but I was never an expert on orchids). A lovely specimen, well photographed. Thanks for posting it.

Henry
Mistress Rose

That's lovely Gz. I am not sure which orchid it is, but I suppose they will be coming up soon. We get pyramid orchids by the roadside here, and I suppose we will be looking out for common spotted orchids now too. gz

I'm sure I saw some sort of Black veined white butterfly today (back in the hills again).
Unfortunately no camera to hand, and being hot weather it was flitting about fast!

I've only seen white butterflies so far...and only one orange tip.
Mistress Rose

It could have been a green veined white as the adults are supposed to be around at this time of year. There are a couple of other butterflies it could have been too, including a female orange tip, but that is more splodgy dark colour than veined.

Butterflies do move about fast in warm weather, which makes taking pictures rather tricky. I have a lasting memory of one of our rather mature volunteers trying to get a picture of a silver washed fritillary and trying to keep up with the various butterflies flitting around.
gz



Back up in the Galloway Hills, clearing grass and buttercups from around an azalea planted in a tyre,underneath a goat willow tree,found this lovely beastie
dpack

big moth? im fairly sure i have seen em before and they turned out to be big moth but that isnt much of an id

watch out for the spines
buzzy

Did you sniff it? It ought to have smelt strongly of goat, since it is the larva of a Goat Moth (Cossus cossus). It had probably been feeding on the Goat (!) Willow, leaving large holes, with exit holes near the base. When ready to pupate (after several years as a larva) they leave the tree for somewhere to pupate, but I've yet to find a suggestion of what sort of place that might be!


Nice find.


Henry
gz

Thankyou! Very Happy
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home