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Mrs Fiddlesticks

wood burners - chimney lining?

Do all chimneys need lining if you have a woodburner? Or does it depend on the age or construction of the house?

We've heard conflicting reports (and are wary of being sold something we don't need). Our house was built in 1994. Its not thatched or anything like that.
Blue Sky

I would like to have my chimney lined if only for the ability to trap the hot air around the flu and pump it into colder areas of the house. As it is at present we only have a flu of 2 meters and all the heat that goes up the chimney is wastes (or is money going up in smoke) as they say ...
MarkS

As long as the chimney is in a good condition then you shouldnt have to. One of ours is flue pipe up to the register plate then a couple of meters of flex.

I am going to fit a full liner though. The other one which has a liner draws much better and starts better, plus its easier to sweep a liner than a whole chimney - esp when the stove is in place.
sean

I'm pretty sure that it's a requirement to meet building regs now. Didn't used to be. There's a link to building regs somewhere here.
dougal

Found this, which explains things
http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/stainlessliner.htm
Contadino

As mentioned, you have to comply with whatever the building regulations are.

Our flue runs up the inside of our lounge, unlined, but the section outside, above the roof is lined. The amount of heat coming off the flue in the lounge is huge - certainly a few kw's in addition to the 6kw that the stove kicks out.
Mrs Fiddlesticks

dougal wrote:
Found this, which explains things
http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/stainlessliner.htm


good link, ta!
lottie

Our stove was put in to replace an old one a year before some regs changed we wanted a new fireplace but the place that put the stove in originally said it would be a really dear job as to put in a new fireplace other stuff including the flue would have to meet the new regs---so we are stuck with a relatively up to date stove in a hideous 70's fireplace Sad
MarkS

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/BR_PDF_ADJ_2002.pdf

Is the uk building regs.
Marionb

Does this apply to multifuel burners as well as wood burners?

We dont have a liner in our chimney but its a multifuel burner which burns mainly coal, we only use wood to get it going when we light it.

And why do you need liners for wood (and multifuel?) burners but not for an open fire?

Also, I would have thought it would be a struggle to get a chimney sweeping brush up one of those liners they dont seem very wide...??
MarkS

you get special brushes sized to the flue.
Marionb

MarkS wrote:
you get special brushes sized to the flue.


Embarassed ah right.... Embarassed

Didnt think of that...
Green Rosie

We have been told here in France it is obligatory to have a liner - but then it was a chimney sweep who told us so it could be that he was touting for work. We were going to have one fitted anyway (we feel it is safer) and are looking into the idea of pumping hot air from around the flue into other rooms
dpack

whatever the local regs a good liner and regular cleaning are necessary for safe woodburning
wood distillates make for an ace chimney fire
Treacodactyl

Re: wood burners - chimney lining?

Mrs Fiddlesticks wrote:
Do all chimneys need lining if you have a woodburner? Or does it depend on the age or construction of the house?

We've heard conflicting reports (and are wary of being sold something we don't need). Our house was built in 1994. Its not thatched or anything like that.


Are you sure the chimney isn't lined already? Even if the chimney doesn't need lining you might well get better performance and require less sweeping if you do get it lined. It would be worth asking over on INEBG as well as there are a few installers over there that seem to give good advice.
Treacodactyl

Simon wrote:
I would like to have my chimney lined if only for the ability to trap the hot air around the flu and pump it into colder areas of the house. As it is at present we only have a flu of 2 meters and all the heat that goes up the chimney is wastes (or is money going up in smoke) as they say ...


Not all the heat that goes up a chimney is wasted, you need a certain amount of heat to create a draw on the fire and if the gasses cool too much then more tar and other stuff will condense inside the chimney.
Truffle

We've just had the chimney re-lined.... it can be pretty expensive. However, we got our flue from here (http://www.fluestore.com/index.php?page=groups&grp=1&subgrp=1&diam=125) which is by far the cheapest place I've found at £14.29 a meter! Then I got a local guy to install it for £100 (providing I helped)... the quotes for getting an installer in to supply and fit were well over twice this...

Truffle

www.PlantationSystems.com
woodsprite

But was your chap HETAS registered and did he provide a certificate? If not you may find insurance wont pay up in the event of a claim and when it comes to selling your house you'll have problems.
The rules are really tightening up on this now and with good reason. Yes I do have a vested interest, my hubby's business but as he has been called to give evidence on no less than 3 deaths caused by cowboy installations of woodburners/multifuel or linings.
I'm not trying to be the harbinger of doom, really I'm not, we've always been DIYers too but some things just aren't worth risking.
Truffle

Yep fully registered and also an on-call fireman. About the best guy for the job Very Happy and it only took 2 hours. Although, he did put me off driving along the local country roads with tales of the number of bodies he has to pull from cars Shocked
dpack

a well installed liner will help protect against fire but also helps prevent carbon monoxide poisoning which is a problem with all fuels not just gas
kevin.vinke

Definitely worth get the right people for this.
It“s done slightly differently here. The chimney sweep (In traditional uniform) turns up to sweep the chimney twice a year (from the top down and you have to clean up the mess).
They also do the inspections of all heating equipment. So I was able to fit both our woodburners myself (after he came to check the flue could take it) but wasn“t allowed to light them till he inspected the work.
He then issues a certificate and this then goes to a central register.
woodsprite

Great news Truffle! As you say, highly qualified. Very Happy
Yep Dpack, thats what causes the deaths, its amazing how many people think that you can't get carbon monoxide poisoning from burning wood/coal etc. Two of the deaths were young children in bedrooms above the woodburners, the fumes slowley leaked into the room through the unlined chimneys, tragic and so easily prevented. Very Happy
vegplot

We had two chimnies lined, one for a multifuel stove and the other for an open fire. We opted for an injected lining in the end as the house is stone built and it was felt the injected liner would help the structeral integrity of the chimney. We had problams with flue gases crossing over from one flue to the other 3/4 of the way up the stack. Dread to think what gases were leaching through the walls.
Ixworth

I lined my chimney a few weeks ago with the twinwall stainless steel stuff. Total cost was about £500 and I did the job more or less single handed.

Although it has improved the draw of the fire, the longer term slow release of heat from the chimney breast is nowhere like before - it used to stay warm to the touch for a couple of days, now it's probably around 12 hours tops. However, the job had to be done as my chimney is actually in the ajoining cottage and the old boy who lives there had noticed some iffy pointing in the attic!

Luckily I get all my firewood for free, so it's now an issue of needing to gather and cut considerably more over the course of the year. However, as the burner heats the whole house I can live with this.

Penny - I'm the bloke who said hello in the shop just before Christmas. You shamed me into finally signing up on here!
dougal

Welcome Ixworth!
Enjoy Downsizer!

I'd have presumed that *twinwall* stainless would be intended to provide significant insulation - so preventing the heat getting into the building structure. While that means that more of the heat is going up the chimney, it also likely means that there's less tar and whatnot being deposited (condensed) in the chimney - so less chimney cleaning, less fire risk.
And if its biofuel, AND free, the only downside is the effort of putting more logs on... Very Happy
Ixworth

Thank you Dougal, it's only taken me about 3 years to sign up!

That's exactly the score with the lining. Actually, the tranferance of heat prior to fitting the lining was sometimes a bit of a poisoned chalice, as the house actually got too hot if you lit the burner during the day. By evening the lower part of the living area would be unbearable. However, as the couple on the other side have no envromental concept at all (and more money than sense) and keep their heating on full blast (even when they're away), which helps create a nice ambient daytime temperature in my house, and thereby reducing my woodburner use to the evenings.
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