Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Mrs Fiddlesticks

woodburner companies

We'd like to put a woodburner in the sitting room if possible. Know nothing about them at all. Can I have a list of the main players so we can start looking in to the subject. (Clearview is the only one I've heard of - would prefer something more contemporary)

I'm thinking this could be a useful sticky?
gil

Vermont Castings (hideously expensive)
Coalbrookdale
Esse
MarkS

there are hundreds of stove makers

I've used harridge as a supplier
http://www.harridgestoves.co.uk/

the web site has a good break down of reasonably priced machines.

for cheap reasonably clean lines Aarrow are OK. Many of the expensive ones are very ornate.

However the Morso range is quite nice (although very expensive and the small one is just ugly)
Jamanda

We've got a Clearview. It's fantastic. And looks reasonably modern I think.
Anders

We're thinking about getting a jotul. Apparently very good, - though quite expensive. Might have to go with something cheaper.

http://www.jotuluk.com/content/products/ProductArticle____3649.aspx
Fee

Wish we had a chimney Rolling Eyes
dougal

Re: woodburner companies

Mrs Fiddlesticks wrote:
We'd like to put a woodburner in the sitting room if possible. Know nothing about them at all. ...

First thing is that you can get "inset" units that go into an existing (large) fireplace. These can duct room air around the firebox instead of having a large cast iron lump on show that can get burningly hot...
They look like a fire behind a modern window. More smart than rustic.

Second thing to consider is the chimney. It'll need a liner. Installing one can be (nearly) as expensive as the stove itself. I think the cost may depend on how straight (or otherwise) the chimney is, as well as how tall...

Don't forget that you'll want somewhere convenient (and under cover) to store a lot of logs!
dougal

Fee wrote:
Wish we had a chimney Rolling Eyes

With an outside wall, you should be able to install not so much a chimney as a "flue" ... sort of a vertical pipe up the outside. Worth an ask?
wellington womble

dougal wrote:
Fee wrote:
Wish we had a chimney Rolling Eyes

With an outside wall, you should be able to install not so much a chimney as a "flue" ... sort of a vertical pipe up the outside. Worth an ask?


which will need to be double skinned, and will be a great deal more expensive than the woodburner!
judith

Anders wrote:
We're thinking about getting a jotul. Apparently very good, - though quite expensive. Might have to go with something cheaper.

http://www.jotuluk.com/content/products/ProductArticle____3649.aspx


We have one of those. It is wonderful.
dougal

wellington womble wrote:
dougal wrote:
Fee wrote:
Wish we had a chimney Rolling Eyes

With an outside wall, you should be able to install not so much a chimney as a "flue" ... sort of a vertical pipe up the outside. Worth an ask?


which will need to be double skinned, and will be a great deal more expensive than the woodburner!
Indeed it might be (could be cheaper on a single story building/extension), yet very much cheaper than either moving house or adding a brick chimney and lining it!
mochyn

Ask Woodsprtie: her chap installs them.

We have a Clearview (which we love) and one of the main reasons for getting one was that they're made not too far from here. So close that the old chap was able to pick ours up from the foundry in his lunchtime!
Jonnyboy

Charnwood here, It's performed very well - DHW and central heating for a roughly 1700sq ft house with wood

http://www.charnwood.com
sean

Re: woodburner companies

dougal wrote:

First thing is that you can get "inset" units that go into an existing (large) fireplace.


Clearview Inset

Everyone I know who installs woodburners for a living has a Clearview .
dougal

Actually, when I was referring to non-rustic looking things, it was more things like these that I had in mind...
http://www.eurostove.co.uk/contentcollectionpage~Type~2~Category~14269.aspx

But I'm sure I've seen prices a bit less steep... Shocked
sean

Whatever the design though an inset will be less efficient than a freestanding model.
dpack

mr blacksmith , blob6 ,hello
Fegrig

Jotul F250 for us, its in the lounge and heats the space very well.
We wanted something with a less traditional look and this was our choice.
dougal

sean wrote:
Whatever the design though an inset will be less efficient than a freestanding model.

I dunno how different they might be. Not much I suspect.

The inset is going to radiate less, for sure. And radiant heat is what you feel most easily. But it wouldn't surprise me if it shed more heat by air convection. The air passages are designed for airflow(some are fan assisted) and thus heat removal, whereas the outside of the typical freestanding stove is designed largely for decorative effect.
The fire should be equally effective at getting heat from the fuel.
The question is whether more goes up the chimney from an inset... myself I doubt there's much difference.
woodsprite

Yep hubbys business is installing woodburners, wood pellet boiler systems and solar panels and yes Sean we are ardent Clearview fans, they are the very best.
Anders

fegrig,

Have you got the soap stone side convector panels with your F250. If so are they worth the extra cash?
Contadino

We have a Charnwood. It's great. A friend has a Clearview, and harps on about how much better it is, but I can't see much difference in build quality, looks, etc., and the Hetas document says that the Charnwood is a little more efficient than the Clearview. The Clearview's don't IMO justify the higher prices.

We house-sat for a friend with an inset fireplace with fans for hot air convection. I don't think I've ever been so cold. The only way to stay warm was to open the door, and then it burned so quickly it was out of control.
thos

dougal wrote:
sean wrote:
Whatever the design though an inset will be less efficient than a freestanding model.

I dunno how different they might be. Not much I suspect.

The inset is going to radiate less, for sure. And radiant heat is what you feel most easily. But it wouldn't surprise me if it shed more heat by air convection. The air passages are designed for airflow(some are fan assisted) and thus heat removal, whereas the outside of the typical freestanding stove is designed largely for decorative effect.
The fire should be equally effective at getting heat from the fuel.
The question is whether more goes up the chimney from an inset... myself I doubt there's much difference.

I have an inset.

Without the fan, we get a pretty fire but hardly any heat. The fan is noisy and would not operate in a power cut.

Although we have not had any power cuts so far, every winter there are power-outs somewhere and I like the idea of being comfortable and being able to brew up should the power go off.

A stove also has a large radiating area. The advantage of this is lost if the stove is shoved into a small fireplace.
Las Combas

Woodwarm stoves

Hello,
I was just reading this and wanted to recommend Woodwarm stoves - http://www.metaldevelopments.co.uk/woodwarm , based in Devon, UK.

I live in France but have bought 2 - one of them has 2 back boilers which heat all our radiators. The best thing about them is the customer service. The guy that makes them has always been at the end of the line to chat about any problems or 'tweaking' of the system. They look lovely too!
lettucewoman

Re: Woodwarm stoves

Las Combas wrote:
Hello,
I was just reading this and wanted to recommend Woodwarm stoves - http://www.metaldevelopments.co.uk/woodwarm , based in Devon, UK.

I live in France but have bought 2 - one of them has 2 back boilers which heat all our radiators. The best thing about them is the customer service. The guy that makes them has always been at the end of the line to chat about any problems or 'tweaking' of the system. They look lovely too!


link doesn't work Sad looking at a hunter - anyone know them??
Treacodactyl

I've amended the link so it works (just put a space before the coma).
sean

Re: Woodwarm stoves

lettucewoman wrote:

link doesn't work Sad


Try http://www.metaldevelopments.co.uk/woodwarm/internet.asp#
Las Combas

Woodwarm stoves

Hello, thanks for ammending the link Embarassed

Just wanted to say that we have a 20kw stove and saddle boilers - this is enough to heat 7 radiators. It also heats all our water in winter, in conjunction with our solar water heating system. If anyone wants any info about combining solar and wood to heat their water / run central heating, feel free to drop us a line.
James

gil wrote:
....Coalbrookdale.....


I love our coalbrookdale. Thick Cast iron, made in Shropshire. Its the simple, cheaper end of good quality. Its very efficient and hassle free.
Fegrig

Anders
sorry been out of the loop for a while and missed your question the answer is I dont know we think that we just bought the stove as it is with no additional bits the only sides that we have are metal.

It was fired up again this week and it certainly does the biz with that in one corner and the aga in the other corner no other heating required.

Doors open when the big room becomes too warm and the rest of the house benefits.
Fegrig

ps just looked at the Jotul site no definately no added soap stone or anything here never felt the need either.
Bebo

Our woodburner has just been fitted. I'm all excited now.
Brandon

I would have a morso every time, form personl experience I have found them to be the best.

But that's my opinion, and which one was reffered to as ugly? surely not the squirrel, bear in mind that these things re for heating space and water, they are not fashion accessories, do you worry about what your gas or oil central heating boiler looks like?
Pea

We had a village on the boat. I found it had more room for a decent log. I found the morso squirral stove great for homefire ovals but not a good size log.

Both great stoves but personal preference would be a villager everytime. the double doors on the front are a little unusual on these type of stoves.
Off the boat now and have a rayburn instead.

Pea
James

Brandon wrote:
do you worry about what your gas or oil central heating boiler looks like?


very true, but then again, my boiler doesn't sit in the middle of my sitting room.

The only thing I'd say of some stoves is that they can look a little twee, a little pseudo- victoriana. But this is personal taste.
Jobi-Wan Kenobi

Hi all,

I can highly recommend the Charnwood LA range. The company I used to work for fitted loads and rarely had any problems. Parts are relatively easy to come by and it's easy enough to service.

Don't forget that the person who fits it MUST be registered with HETAS, similar to CORGI engineers for Gas.

Also before you go out and buy one make sure you have your chimney/ flue smoke pressure tested to BS6461. This will test for any leaks which would mean products of combustion (smoke and carbon monoxide) entering back into the property or loft space. Cracks in linings appear when the flues have not been used for a while.

If your flue does need to be relined, make sure you go for a metal copex (big silver worm!) liner or sectional concrete/ aluminium. I would stronly go against having a pumped concrete lining as you are liable to get weak spots and this is not detected without a lot of money being spent on tests. Lining costs between 750 (metal copex) to 1500 (sectional aluminium) on average, depending on where you are and how busy the engineers are. Needless to say winter is a busy time!!

If I can help further (I have names and numbers) then please pm me as I don't want to get into trouble with the mods on my first post!!

Smile
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Energy Efficiency and Construction/Major Projects
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home