Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
himalayan balsam, not all bad
Page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment
Author 
 Message
dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33026
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 16 9:08 pm    Post subject: himalayan balsam, not all bad  Reply with quote    

while i was out and about today i spotted a rather nice ladybird on a patch of quite short himalayan balsam beside the nidd.
in the next 5 mins or so i established 9 different ladybird species within a volume of about 100 litres (area does not explain it well as they were at different "altitudes" on the plants. Im not sure why they were there, if it was to gobble a late flush of aphids they had eaten them, they could have sunned themselves on a variety of plants but they were concentrated on this patch of HB.

2 points ,i have never seen so many different species in a small space and each species had multiple examples present.

maybe HB is not the monster it has been designated as and in some places it might actually be good for biodiversity as well as feeding bees for months when in full flower.

perhaps it needs some proper study to establish what else can treat it as home or grocers/butchers shop

Last edited by dpack on Sun Oct 16, 16 5:51 pm; edited 1 time in total

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 7:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think the major problem with it is that it spreads so much and out competes native plants. I agree about its use as food for bees and other insects, and I actually like it, but then I don't have to worry about trying to keep it out of my land as we are far too dry.

How many different sorts of native ladybird are there Dpack?

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3136
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I can answer that! There are twenty three species of native ladybird. There are three immigrant species

Harlequin

Bryony

Thirteen Spot - this may have been native but is now regarded as extinct with occasional colonies arising from immigration

Henry

derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 702
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We have hundreds of mtrs of this around the parks in Derby completely devastating any other plants. Despite using the Community payback people as labour to pull it out year after year it has taken over. Access to the river bank has been stopped by beds of it over 15 ft wide, quite amazing as it was not there 5 years ago.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 33026
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

there were harlequins and 8 others of assorted sizes and spot counts.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14825
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

derbyshiredowser wrote:
We have hundreds of mtrs of this around the parks in Derby completely devastating any other plants. Despite using the Community payback people as labour to pull it out year after year it has taken over...

What happens to the stuff that is pulled up?
If ways can be found to monetise it, then there will be more funds for control.

derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 702
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Its left lying on the ground with the roots exposed and then I assume the council collect it. Thinking about it maybe that's why its come back with avengence as it should be removed straight away. with regards to monetising it I remember a recipe for currying the seeds on here a few years ago.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3136
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

derbyshiredowser wrote:
Its left lying on the ground with the roots exposed and then I assume the council collect it. Thinking about it maybe that's why its come back with avengence as it should be removed straight away. with regards to monetising it I remember a recipe for currying the seeds on here a few years ago.


As I recall, HB grows from seeds, which it produces in great profusion. Thus it is important to pull or cut it before it flowers. Stuff you pull just dies, but if there are seed pods close to ripening, they will help the spread! Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.

Henry

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
As I recall, HB grows from seeds, which it produces in great profusion. Thus it is important to pull or cut it before it flowers. Stuff you pull just dies, but if there are seed pods close to ripening, they will help the spread! Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.


It can also root from broken pieces during the growing season, if you look at the stems they're covered in little roots waiting to come into contact with some soil. Whole plants can also get washed down stream only to wash up and carry on growing.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14825
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.

Anything can go into anaerobic digestion to make gas...

derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 702
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Despite years of protest , public enquiry and changes of control at the council this is nearly ready to be fired up.

http://resource.co/sustainability/article/gib-invests-rrs%e2%80%99s-derby-incinerator-3247

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3136
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
buzzy wrote:
Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.

Anything can go into anaerobic digestion to make gas...


I'm sure you are right. The question is "Does HB produce enough gas to make it worthwhile cutting, collecting and transporting it?"

Henry

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3136
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 16 11:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
buzzy wrote:
As I recall, HB grows from seeds, which it produces in great profusion. Thus it is important to pull or cut it before it flowers. Stuff you pull just dies, but if there are seed pods close to ripening, they will help the spread! Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.


It can also root from broken pieces during the growing season, if you look at the stems they're covered in little roots waiting to come into contact with some soil. Whole plants can also get washed down stream only to wash up and carry on growing.


Thanks. I didn't know that - and I've not come into close enough contact with it to have seen detail of the stems. I just know it seeds very well.

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8914

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 16 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That does of course highlight why it needs to be controlled. Like ragwort, it probably ought to be put head first into a plastic sack then taken away and allowed to rot in the sack or be burnt.

derbyshiredowser



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
Posts: 702
Location: derbyshire
PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 16 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
That does of course highlight why it needs to be controlled. Like ragwort, it probably ought to be put head first into a plastic sack then taken away and allowed to rot in the sack or be burnt.


The ill timed ad hoc approach to its eradication means the seeds are triggered by people and dogs and when pulled up just left lying on the ground has left us with vast swathes of it. Looking at it yesterday there must be a kilometre of it along the bank of the river Derwent by 15ft deep beds and the further 400mtrs along some flood defences. To my horror they have come along last week and mown it down in three places and left the stems in small sections on the ground. I don't think the council are taking it seriously.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment All times are GMT
Page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com

<-- -->